Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Holtz for House: The Strange History of Sports Stars and Politics



Congressman Lou Holtz? AP Photo/Junji Kurokawa

The news that former Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz (R) is considering a run for Congress in Florida against Rep. Suzanne Kosmas (D) got us to thinking about the often strange intersection of sports and politics.

Holtz, according to the Orlando Sentinel, met with officials at the National Republican Congressional Committee last week to discuss the race, and, GOP operatives told the Fix this morning that the former Golden Domer is serious about a run although he has made no decisions yet.

The district, which Kosmas won from embattled Rep. Tom Feeney (R) in 2008, is closely divided between the parties; Sen. John McCain (R) won 51 percent there last November but President George W. Bush claimed 55 percent in 2004.

Holtz, as the Sentinel notes, would almost certainly be the favorite to win the Republican nomination thanks to his near universal name identification. Of course, Holtz's past statements -- most notably his praise for Adolf Hitler last year -- would likely haunt his candidacy.

A look back at other sports celebrities who have run for political office proves a mixed bag.

Two men -- Bill Bradley and Jack Kemp -- clearly are the cream of the sports stars-turned-politicians crop.

Bradley, the former New York Knicks star turned New Jersey Senator and 2000 presidential candidate, used his fame from his years starring at Madison Square Garden to aid his initial run for Senate in 1978. But, the Rhodes Scholar's intellect and seriousness on the issues is what distinguished him from the rest of the sports pack.

Kemp, who starred at quarterback for the Buffalo Bills, spent 18 years in the House representing New York before landing on the national ticket with former Kansas Sen. Bob Dole (Kans.) in 1996. Of Kemp, who died in in early May, the New York Times wrote: "As a popular football player he had campaigned in New York for Nelson A. Rockefeller and in California for Ronald Reagan in their gubernatorial races and for Richard M. Nixon and Barry Goldwater in their presidential bids. And he was a name in Buffalo."

For every Bradley or Kemp, however, there are three Richard Pettys -- the famous stock car race who lost a bid for Secretary of State in North Carolina to Elaine Marshall (D) in 1996.

In short, celebrity sports status ensures that voters will give you a longer look that they might grant someone they had never heard of. But, it is far from a guarantee of electoral success.

Our look at other sports celebrities turned politicians is after the jump. Who did we miss? The comments section awaits.

The Fix List of Sports Stars Turned Politicians (listed alphabetically)

Bob Backlund (R): The man who was wrestling before professional wrestling was cool, Backlund ran an ill-fated campaign for Congress from Connecticut in 2000. He was crushed by Rep. John Larson (D) 72 percent to 28 percent. (Side note: The Fix's first story to appear in print was a profile of Backlund.)

Peter Boulware (R): The former Florida State star linebacker ran unsuccessfully for the Florida state House in 2008. He lost that race but was subsequently appointed to the Florida Board of Education by Gov. Charlie Crist (R).

Jim Bunning (R): Bunning, a Kentucky Senator, has the unique distinction of being the only member of the Baseball Hall of Fame to be elected to Congress. His reputation as a pitcher -- confrontational and aggressive -- and his reputation as politician jibed nicely. Bunning will retire from the Senate in 2010 after 12 years in the chamber.

Gerald Ford (R): Ford was not the caliber of athlete of some on this list -- he played football at the University of Michigan but turned down the chance to play professionally -- but he was among the best politicians. After spending decades in the House, Ford wound up as Richard Nixon's vice president following Spiro Agnew's resignation and ascended to the nation's highest office when Nixon stepped aside after Watergate. Ford went on to lose his own bid for a full term to Jimmy Carter in 1976.

Kevin Johnson (D): The former Phoenix Suns star is the mayor of Sacramento following his 57 percent victory last November. Johnson weathered a series of charges about his personal conduct during the campaign, using his star power and endorsements from the like of Magic Johnson to ride to victory.

Steve Largent (R): Largent, the greatest receiver in Seattle Seahawks history, was regarded as a rising star within the Republican party during much of the 1990s. Elected to an Oklahoma House seat in 1994, Largent was the odds-on favorite to win the governorship in 2002 before his disappearance around the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks -- he was hunting and unaware that anything had happened -- led to a rapid decline in his poll numbers and eventual defeat.

* Tom McMillen (D): At 6'11", McMillen towered over the competition during his carer at the University of Maryland and spent a few seasons in the NBA. Like Bradley, McMillen was a Rhodes Scholar who gravitated toward politics. Elected to a Maryland congressional seat from 1986 to 1992, McMillen he lost a redistricting-forced fight to Rep. Wayne Gilchrest (R).

* Wilmer "Vinegar Bend" Mizell (R): After spending more than a decade in the major leagues, Mizell (whose nickname comes from the town in Alabama where he pitched) was elected to Congress from North Carolina in 1968 and served for six years.

* Tom Osborne (R): Osborne, the beloved coach of the Nebraska Cornhuskers football team, won the state's 3rd district House seat almost by acclamation in 2000 (he took 82 percent of the vote). But, harder times awaited when Osborne decided to primary Gov. Dave Heineman (R) in 2006; in a stunning upset, Heineman beat the living legend 50 percent to 44 percent.

*Richard Petty (R): "The King", a legend in NASCAR-crazy North Carolina, was widely expected to coast to the Secretary of State's office in 1996. But, Petty proved a somewhat uninspiring candidate and lost to Marshall 53 percent to 45 percent.

* Bobby Richardson (R): A part of the legendary New York Yankee teams of the 1950 and '60s, Richardson tried to enter politics in 1976 when he challenged Rep. Ken Holland (D) in South Carolina's 5th district. Richardson lost that race narrowly.

* Heath Shuler (D): After a disappointing pro football career that included a stint with the Washington Redskins, Shuler found far more success in politics -- running and winning North Carolina's 11th district in 2006. Shuler was aggressively courted to take on Sen. Richard Burr (R) next November but resisted those entreaties.

*Lynn Swann (R): The Hall of Fame wide receiver was touted by national Republicans during his 2006 challenge to Gov. Ed Rendell (D) but never panned out. Rendell pounded Swann 60 percent to 40 percent to cruise to a second term.

*Jesse Ventura (I): The most stunning success story among sports celebrities turned politicians is Ventura who, after years spent pumping up as "The Body" on the professional wrestling circuit, ran what was assumed to be a long shot candidacy for the Minnesota governorship in 1998. Ventura wound up winning and spent a tumultuous four years in office before retiring. He was mentioned as a potential Senate candidate in 2008 but decided against a run.

* J.C. Watts (R): The star quarterback of Oklahoma University's wishbone offense (and Canadian Football League standout), Watts was elected to the U.S. House in 1994 and rose as high as the fourth ranking leadership spot among House Republicans before retiring from office in 2002. Since then Watts has been recruited to run for any number of offices -- including governor in 2010 -- but has stayed out of the game.

By Chris Cillizza  |  August 4, 2009; 1:02 PM ET
Categories:  House  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Pawlenty vs Romney On Health Care
Next: The Most Important Number(s) in Politics Today

Comments

Fight, fight
For the old Third Reich!
Goosestep around for the Old Third Reich!

Posted by: Garak | August 5, 2009 6:05 PM | Report abuse

Lou will have no problem making the transition from giving pep talks to ball players to giving pep talks to Florida voters

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=No1J5B1qbIA

Posted by: Patriot3 | August 5, 2009 4:38 PM | Report abuse

Regarding your suggestion of the New Yorker article, these pieces always astound me. Articles on southern race relations always come off as if the south has a monopoly on racism. Gladwell writes as if he's trying to educate those from other parts of the world on the very concept. Apparently he thought he was writing a piece in National Geographic about some long lost tribe. Southerners, if you are to believe Gladwell, are not only racist, but sexist, classist, and anti-semitic! Even "the good ones". Here are their customs and beliefs. Here are their legal practices. How strange and otherworldly!
I'm not trying to defend the history of racism in the south, but so many like to pretend that it doesn't exist anywhere else. As a southern progressive (the kind Gladwell thinks are dead and gone), I find that to be a bigoted point of view.

Posted by: gtrain82 | August 5, 2009 2:50 PM | Report abuse

Did you forget George Mikan who not only was on the oft-winning Minnesota Lakers, but earned his law degree in the off season and served for many years as a representative of Minnesota.

Posted by: maab76 | August 5, 2009 1:14 PM | Report abuse

Although Steve Largent is no longer in office, he is far from washed up. As the president of CTIA (the wireless carriers' trade association) he is one of the most powerful and respected voices in the lobbying/special interest community.

Posted by: rlritter | August 5, 2009 1:04 PM | Report abuse

How could Bill Bradley be left off?

Posted by: ChrisDC | August 5, 2009 12:26 PM | Report abuse

Eugene McCarthy was a semipro baseball player.

And Barney Frank, although what you'd call an athlete, was an accomplished softball player in the Congressional league when he was the legislative assistant to former Rep. Michael Harrington, D-Ma., back in the 1970s.

Posted by: maris9 | August 5, 2009 11:49 AM | Report abuse

Before he was a Knick "Dollar" Bill Bradley was a Rhodes Scholar so he was far from being a dumb jock.

I once saw a Lou Holtz interview on C-Span. He had a picture of Jesse Helms behind his desk.'nuff said

koolkat_1960 Ronald Reagan is also famously remembered for his service during World War II. Oh that's right, his service was in Hollywood making propaganda movies. He really didn't serve. Only cowards like George McGovern did real fighting.

John Wayne also sat it out in Hollywood yet he is lionized while folks like McGovern get trashed. Remember Newts "Counterculture McGovernicks" ?

Posted by: MerrillFrank | August 5, 2009 11:29 AM | Report abuse

Mike Minter is mulling a run against US Rep. Larry Kissell here in NC. Minter is a retired Carolina Panther.

Posted by: reason5 | August 5, 2009 10:25 AM | Report abuse

bsimon: "Any sportos yet made it to the USSC?"

Boy, I am feeling old today. When I was a kid, everyone knew the story of Supreme Court Justice and Heisman Trophy winner Byron "Whizzer" White.

He hated being called Whizzer. Not surprising, since he really was a crochety old coot.

Posted by: koolkat_1960 | August 5, 2009 10:12 AM | Report abuse

One more athlete, this time from the distaff side, Judy Martz, former Governor of Montana was an Olympic speedskater in 1964.

Posted by: MTModerate | August 5, 2009 10:03 AM | Report abuse

It is just flat out wrong that Gerald Ford was "not the caliber of athlete" of others on the list. Gerald Ford was indeed a terrific athlete. He played for the University of Michigan and I believe was all Big-Ten, if not All American. Professional football in the 1930s was nothing like it was today. He turned down the NFL, not the other way around.

Posted by: Craig_Colgan | August 5, 2009 8:05 AM | Report abuse

Rep. Jim Ryun (R-KN) was a member of the House of Representatives from 1996 to 2007.

He was the first person to run one mile under 4:00 in high school. His high school world record stood for 36 years, from 1965 to 2001, when it was broken by Alan Webb.

Ryan was the last American to hold the world record for the one-mile run (3:51.1).

Posted by: graydonstephenson | August 5, 2009 5:27 AM | Report abuse

You forgot Bud Wilkinson the U of Oklahoma coach who ran for Senator from Oklahoma as a Republican -- he lost.

Posted by: jdrd58 | August 4, 2009 11:33 PM | Report abuse

One point in Lou Holtz's favor when it comes to entering politics: as the former head football coach at Notre Dame, he knows all about dealing with religious fanatics.

Posted by: bpai_99 | August 4, 2009 7:11 PM | Report abuse

Chris,

There is such a vast chasm between the physical strength and muscular coordination it takes to be a star on the pitch and the strategic, selective sincerity, likability, and intellectual command of at least some issues required in a politician, I would venture to suggest that people like Bill Bradley and Jack Kemp were the exception rather than the rule--need I mention the Geo. Allen 'Macacca moment' which saved everyone from discovering that many sport figures are of fairly limited--or at least narrowly focussed--intelligence?

Certainly, Coach Holtz's 'Hitler comments' will come back to haunt him, and he might need to step lively to avoid landing in a puddle of macacca!

Posted by: sverigegrabb | August 4, 2009 5:40 PM | Report abuse

Gen. Pete Dawkins also ran for office. While not a professional athlete, he is a Heisman trophy winner and a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

He was the 1988 Republican nominee for US Senate and lost to Sen Frank Lautenberg.

Posted by: rumson34 | August 4, 2009 5:23 PM | Report abuse

Gen. Pete Dawkins also ran for office. While not a professional athlete, he is a Heisman trophy winner and a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

He was the 1988 Republican nominee for US Senate and lost to Sen Frank Lautenberg.

Posted by: rumson34 | August 4, 2009 5:23 PM | Report abuse

Phil McConkey, NY Giants wide receiver ran in the 1990 Republican primary for the 12th Congressional District of New Jersey. He lost to Dick Zimmer who went on to win the open seat in the general election.

Posted by: rumson34 | August 4, 2009 5:00 PM | Report abuse

"Any sportos yet made it to the USSC?"

I think Sotomayor has a UFC belt.

Posted by: DDAWD | August 4, 2009 4:49 PM | Report abuse

By the way, Joe Mauer could probably take Rep McCollum's seat with a write-in campaign.

Posted by: bsimon1 | August 4, 2009 4:47 PM | Report abuse

"does not Alan Page sit on the MN Supremes?"


Indeed he does.

Wildly disparate thoughts:

Any sportos yet made it to the USSC?

Will Matt Burk go into politics?

.

Posted by: bsimon1 | August 4, 2009 4:43 PM | Report abuse

speaking of Udalls
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Udall_family

There's a cool family tree at the bottom.

Anyone know the recently ousted Gordon Smith from Oregon is related to the Udalls?

Posted by: DDAWD | August 4, 2009 4:43 PM | Report abuse

"'Elwyn Tinklenberg'?, bsimon?

that sounds like a character from Teletubbies or something."


If his name were Sven Larson, he'd be a congressman.


.

Posted by: bsimon1 | August 4, 2009 4:40 PM | Report abuse

I was just flipping through the biographies of female senators and governors and none of them mention sports in their background. I guess the girls have to build their public standing on other accomplishments.

OH, wait! There's that famous b-ball player who is governor of Alaska. Was governor of Alaska.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | August 4, 2009 4:39 PM | Report abuse

How bout D Big Bill Bradley?

Posted by: drindl | August 4, 2009 4:37 PM | Report abuse

"Ddawd, Metcalfe was a D."

Yeah, I know there are some athlete Ds, but the far majority of them seem to be Rs. I wonder if its because of their wealth or if there's something else.

By the way, way to outdo me on the GHWB baseball reference, haha.

Also, I think Curt Schilling might be someone to jump into the political arena soon. He was a pretty vocal Bush supporter in 2004. Not sure about 2008.

Posted by: DDAWD | August 4, 2009 4:36 PM | Report abuse

bsimon - does not Alan Page sit on the MN Supremes?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | August 4, 2009 4:35 PM | Report abuse

Did anyone mention Reagan yet?

He was a better actor than president, actually. More beleivable.

Posted by: drindl | August 4, 2009 4:34 PM | Report abuse

No need for another GOP good ole boy in the Congress.

Posted by: jbentley4 | August 4, 2009 4:33 PM | Report abuse

'Elwyn Tinklenberg'?, bsimon?

that sounds like a character from Teletubbies or something.

Posted by: drindl | August 4, 2009 4:33 PM | Report abuse

Ddawd - to think of a lot of D jocks, think of black NBA guys - did not Dave Bing just get elected Mayor of Detroit?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | August 4, 2009 4:30 PM | Report abuse

"Who can forget Fred Grandy and Sonny Bono?!"

probably everyone but you.

Voigt is a frothing lunatic now. Too bad. He litterally has to wipe the spittle off his face after his rants. Too bad.

Posted by: drindl | August 4, 2009 4:28 PM | Report abuse

2 more Ds come to mind, Ddawd: Mo Udall played college and pro basketball and Whizzer White was a Supreme who was an All-American FB player.

I am not working while I try to think of all these folks who were jock-pols.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | August 4, 2009 4:28 PM | Report abuse

"Enjoyed this post, Chris -- it'd be fun to see one involving actors who became politicians. How about musicians? "

I think Jon Voight is a birther. I saw him do some rantings against Obama last year even a Wash Times op ed. Pretty lunatic crazy.

Posted by: DDAWD | August 4, 2009 4:22 PM | Report abuse

jrosco3:

Who can forget Fred Grandy and Sonny Bono?!

Posted by: JakeD | August 4, 2009 4:22 PM | Report abuse

Another Olympian of my youth was Bob Mathias who won the decathlon as a teenager in 1948. He later played FB for Cal, I think, and was a R Congressman from CA.

Ddawd, Metcalfe was a D.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | August 4, 2009 4:19 PM | Report abuse

dganderson13 - Your accusations amount to libel and actually subject this newspaper to lawsuits. I am no fan of Steven Largent, but there has never been any accusations of spousal abuse or adultery. Your spreading this collection of outright lies makes you no different than the "birthers".

As for Steven Largents loss. He *resigned* his seat in Congress in order to make a run for the governorship of Oklahoma. He lost, in a bitter three way contest by fewer than 7,000 votes when Dick Armey (who hated Largent because Largent opposed and sank his run as Speaker) sponsored a third party Republican candidate that drew votes from Largent and when the well funded Democratic candidate came out in favor of cock fighting! It had nothing to do with hunting, Chris, either. If you are going to be dishonest, at least try and be a bit more creative than this.

Posted by: mibrooks27 | August 4, 2009 4:10 PM | Report abuse

"George Bush was a cheerleader at Yale does that count?"

I think 41 was a very good baseball player for Yale as well.

Any theories as to why these guys are so predominantly R?

Posted by: DDAWD | August 4, 2009 4:07 PM | Report abuse

Bush 41 was an excellent baseball player. He played in the first two CWSs in Omaha.

The great Ralph Metcalfe was an OH Congressman and had a successful life, generally. Metcalfe at one time helde the 200M sprint record at 20.6 and was a silver medalist in '32 and '36 and won gold on the '36 sprint relay team in Berlin. I have NOT looked this up recently and am relying on a TV dramatization I saw.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | August 4, 2009 4:07 PM | Report abuse

I disagree with the parallels. Lou Holtz isn't famous for being a player, he's famous for being a coach. The closest parallel I can think of is Tom Osborne, the legendary coach of the Nebraska Cornhuskers, who served a few terms in the House after retiring.

While an athlete is well prepared for the role of politics (used to fame), I don't think the same is true of a coach or manager. They're used to running the show, not being a part of the team. Different skills, different temperaments. Osborne made no impact in the House and is back in Nebraska, hopefully restoring Big Red to its rightful place.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | August 4, 2009 4:04 PM | Report abuse

I'm not so sure that Jesse Ventura classifies as a "sports star", but rumor has it that Congressman Boehner sports a 7.5 handicap on the golf course . . .

Enjoyed this post, Chris -- it'd be fun to see one involving actors who became politicians. How about musicians?

Posted by: jrosco3 | August 4, 2009 3:50 PM | Report abuse

Oh, drat. I was hoping Jesse was going to be exposing these theories as pure bunk, like Myth Busters. But the article says he has a penchant for espousing alternative theories, so I guess not.

Posted by: mikeinmidland | August 4, 2009 3:32 PM | Report abuse

Steve Largent lost not because of 9/11, but becuase of affairs. Typical hypocrite. Cheating on his wife and verbal abuse of women.

Posted by: dganderson13 | August 4, 2009 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Speaking of former Gov Jesse Ventura, the larger-than-life former wrestler, Navy SEAL, actor, radio host & Harvard guest lecturer ("Al Franken went to Harvard, but I taught there" -jv), will be hosting a TV show this fall dedicated to conspiracy theories.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2009/08/04/ventura-cable-show/

No word on whether he'll dive into the mystery surrounding our President's birth.


p.s. Hau'oli la hanau, Mr President.

Posted by: bsimon1 | August 4, 2009 3:24 PM | Report abuse

"Since you mentioned Ford, Ronald Reagan also played college sports, including football, at Eureka College and was a sports announcer -- probably not considered "celebrity sports" though -- he is more famously remembered for his film sports roles, such as in "Knute Rockne, All American"."

Ronald Reagan is also famously remembered for his service during World War II. Oh that's right, his service was in Hollywood making propaganda movies. He really didn't serve. Only cowards like George McGovern did real fighting.

Posted by: koolkat_1960 | August 4, 2009 3:21 PM | Report abuse

George Bush was a cheerleader at Yale does that count?

On Holtz, I don't think that is a great idea for him to run. He is pretty crazy and if you have watched him on TV over the past two years you cringe anytime he opens his mouth. Sometimes athletes make great politicians and sometimes not so much. Just like everyother type of profession.

Posted by: AndyR3 | August 4, 2009 3:21 PM | Report abuse

Dwight Eisenhower long had aspirations of playing professional baseball:

“When I was a small boy in Kansas, a friend of mine and I went fishing and as we sat there in the warmth of the summer afternoon on a river bank, we talked about what we wanted to do when we grew up. I told him that I wanted to be a real major league baseball player, a genuine professional like Honus Wagner. My friend said that he'd like to be President of the United States. Neither of us got our wish.”

At West Point, Eisenhower tried out for the baseball team but did not make it. He would later say that "not making the baseball team at West Point was one of the greatest disappointments of my life, maybe my greatest." But Eisenhower did make the football team. He started as a varsity running back and linebacker in 1912. In a bit of a fabled match-up, he even tackled the legendary Jim Thorpe in a 1912 game. The very next week, however, Eisenhower would hurt his knee after being tackled himself around the ankles, which he would soon worsen and permanently damage on horseback and in the boxing ring.

Controversy persists over whether Eisenhower played minor league (semi-professional) baseball for Junction City in the Central Kansas League the year before he attended West Point.

In 1916, while stationed at Fort Sam Houston, Eisenhower was the football coach for St. Louis College, now St. Mary's University.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwight_D._Eisenhower#Athletic_career

Posted by: JakeD | August 4, 2009 3:15 PM | Report abuse

"I for one was very disappointed by JC Watts dropping out of politics.

Although posters like "chrisfox8" and "drindl" see a racist in anyone who doesn't like Obama, I will gladly vote for anyone who practices conservative politics...regardless of race."

Actually, you should be complaining about the racists who kept JC Watts from rising higher in the Republican Party. They are why he is no longer a congressman.

Posted by: koolkat_1960 | August 4, 2009 3:07 PM | Report abuse

Tink withdraws!!

Elwyn Tinklenberg, who lost by 3.5 points to Rep Bachmann for the MN-6 seat in 2008, has withdrawn from the 2010 race, leaving state Rep Tarryl Clark & Maureen Reed to vie for the endorsement & nomination. Clark should be considered a heavy favorite to face Bachmann, and has the potential to be very competitive in the general election.

http://www.minnpost.com/politicalagenda/2009/08/04/10673/tinklenberg_withdraws_in_6th_district_race_leaving_2_dfl_women_to_take_on_bachmann

Posted by: bsimon1 | August 4, 2009 3:06 PM | Report abuse

Since you mentioned Ford, Ronald Reagan also played college sports, including football, at Eureka College and was a sports announcer -- probably not considered "celebrity sports" though -- he is more famously remembered for his film sports roles, such as in "Knute Rockne, All American".

Posted by: JakeD | August 4, 2009 3:02 PM | Report abuse

Just what the GOP needs -- a 74 year-old Freshman.

I realize that in certain parts of Florida, Holtz may look young and vigorous but...

Posted by: margaretmeyers | August 4, 2009 3:01 PM | Report abuse

Arnold Schwarzenegger competed in Mr. Universe and Mr. Olympia bodybuilding contests. Are those "sports"?

I really miss that Chicago Bears coach, Mike Ditka, didn't get into the 2004 Senate race.

Posted by: JakeD | August 4, 2009 2:57 PM | Report abuse

I know a little about OK politics: Chris is right about Largent--he was portrayed as "out of touch" and it was insinuated he was somehow derelict in his duties because of 9/11. It was enough to raise doubts in the mind of the voters. He also performed poorly in the debates. As for J.C Watts, I hope he stays in retirement. He was a decidedly lackluster congressman.

Posted by: soonerthought | August 4, 2009 2:51 PM | Report abuse

Gerald Ford was not a Democrat.

Posted by: soonerthought | August 4, 2009 2:43 PM | Report abuse

Gallenod:

Good question. I wondered the same thing when I read it. It appears to be a misprint. The election for governor that Largent was involved in was 2002, and he only lost by 7,000 votes.

And from what I read, his loss probably had more to do with the presence of a 3rd option on the ballot...a former Republican turned independent (ala Ross Perot).....than it did with anything related to 9/11.

Posted by: dbw1 | August 4, 2009 2:30 PM | Report abuse

I for one was very disappointed by JC Watts dropping out of politics.

Although posters like "chrisfox8" and "drindl" see a racist in anyone who doesn't like Obama, I will gladly vote for anyone who practices conservative politics...regardless of race.

Posted by: dbw1 | August 4, 2009 2:23 PM | Report abuse

Oh, one more thing...

Ford lost to Carter in 1976, not 1980.

Posted by: Gallenod | August 4, 2009 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Chris: I'm a little confused about the Steve Largent entry. How does Largent being out hunting during 9/11 relate to an election for governor three years earlier in 1998?

Posted by: Gallenod | August 4, 2009 2:19 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company