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House Republicans: Three-Way Race for Whip

Michigan Rep. Mike Rogers has decided to run for majority whip, according to a source close to the congressman.  The move throws a roadblock into what looked like an easy victory for Virginia Rep. Eric Cantor.

Rogers is expected to announce his bid this afternoon.  A former FBI agent, Rogers will run a race centered on "accountability and trust," said the source. He will also cast himself as the only real option for change in the leadership races given that Cantor as well as Reps. Roy Blunt (Mo.) and John Boehner (Ohio) are either currently in the GOP leadership or formerly served in the leadership.

Kansas Rep. Todd Tiahrt is also expected to enter the whip race this afternoon although his office would not confirm his intentions to The Fix.

The candidacies of Rogers and Tiahrt come even as Cantor allies claim he is nearing the 117  commitments necessary to sew up the contest.  Cantor has worked the phones for nearly three days straight in an attempt to end the race before any other candidate formally emerges.

The next several days will be crucial for Rogers and Tiahrt to see if either can gain traction against Cantor.  Both face uphill bids given Cantor's head start.

Keep in mind that Blunt has said he plans to stay on as majority whip if he loses his bid against Boehner for majority leader.  With a three-way race going on to succeed him, it may make it increasingly difficult for Blunt to simply use the whip slot as a fall-back position.

By Chris Cillizza  |  January 9, 2006; 2:03 PM ET
Categories:  House  
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Comments

GOP house elections are a real travesty. In the days when Abamaoff, Delay, Cunningham and Duke are the poster child of the GOP, they opt for a business as ususal approach to governing. The GOP clearly stands at the apex of a corrupt system that says one must pay to play in government. This is not to say the DEMS have made an alternative case either.

However, if the GOP new leadership looks, smells, and behaves the ways of the past GOP, the American public will turn on them. Americans are slowly realizing that rewards for government posts, legislative initiatives etc, are all sold to the highest bidder. The GOP has put American democracy up for sale to the highest bidder. What ever happened to the reward system of hard work.

Take this GOP world to small town America where stagnant wages, and two jobs are the norm to make ends meet, and you have a total disconnect between the GOP Washington and the heartland of America.

I dont pretend to know the answers, but the message to the basic amerian family is simply this. You pay, you can play in our league. We dont care how hard you work, if you donate to our cause, then we are your friends. Otherwise, you must be un-American, un-patriotic, and lazy.

Posted by: DB | January 10, 2006 5:14 PM | Report abuse

im impressed with this blog and the features on the web site. congratulations on getting into the new world with something different that is not the same old dull stuff that usually appears in the post.. looking foward to the future..good luck.

Posted by: sol | January 10, 2006 6:26 AM | Report abuse

I'm trying to figure out how Eric Cantor, who took $10,000 from an Indian tribe and signed on to a letter supporting their cause, can now be viewed as a "reform" candidate for whip. Maybe he is a reform candidate by Republican standards.

Posted by: Lilly | January 9, 2006 5:31 PM | Report abuse

I'm trying to figure out how Eric Cantor, who took $10,000 from an Indian tribe and signed on to a letter supporting their cause, can now be viewed as a "reform" candidate for whip. Maybe he is a reform candidate by Republican standards.

Posted by: Lilly | January 9, 2006 5:30 PM | Report abuse

aren't the elections for whip and leader on the same day? If Blunt loses, which is very possible, how can he claim he will remain whip when someone else has been elected to replace him? Or is the whip race trigerred by the result of the majority leader's race? A little confused here

Posted by: nickshep | January 9, 2006 3:00 PM | Report abuse

When a candidate claims he/she has X number of commitments? how often does that person overshoot/undershoot in the history of congressional leadership elections..just curious

Posted by: Lorraine in South Bend, IN | January 9, 2006 2:58 PM | Report abuse

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