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Rising Republican tide lifts recruiting

Democratic elected officials and party strategists have taken -- of late -- to reminding the political world (including the Fix) that while the national environment isn't particularly friendly for them at the moment, there is lots of time between now and November for things to change.

After all, they rightly argue, it was only a year ago that Democrats were toasting their across-the-board victories and envisioning a new age of party dominance. And, less than two years passed between President George W. Bush's 2004 re-election -- and the promise of an enduring Republican majority -- and the 2006 election that put Democrats back into the House and Senate majorities and paved the way for President Obama's election in 2008.

All true. But, one of the least appreciated -- but most critically important -- impacts that a tilted national environment can have on the battle for congressional control is in recruiting. The better the outlook looks for a party a year or so from an election, the more candidates of that party are willing to take the leap to run for office -- ensuring that, no matter the change in the electoral climate, the playing field will be broadened.

Witness the successes House Republicans have had of late on the recruiting trail. In that time, a number of potentially strong candidates have emerged including North Dakota Public Service Commissioner Kevin Cramer who will announce tomorrow he is taking on Rep. Earl Pomeroy while former U.S. Attorney Mary Beth Buchanan is now leaning toward a race against Rep. Jason Altmire (D-Pa.) and Republicans havea trio of quality candidates state House Majority Leader Morgan Griffith considering a run against Rep. Rick Boucher (D-Va.) who hasn't had a seriously contested race since 1984(!).

While recruiting is clearly picking up speed for Republicans thanks to the political environment, it's important to remember that not all is perfect for the minority party.

First of all, the rise of the tea party movement -- they will hold their first national gathering in Nashville next month -- has ensured that many of these GOP recruits will face serious fights for the nominations and, in many cases, may wind up losing to someone who is far less equipped to knock off a targeted Democrat in the fall. By Democrats' calculations, 50 seats currently being targeted by Republicans feature GOP primary fights.

Second, for all the energy on the Republican side of the ledger, the House campaign committee is not experiencing the sort of financial windfall that would allow GOP strategists to take advantage of all the opportunities created by solid recruiting.

At the end of November, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee had $15.3 million on hand as compared $4.3 million for the National Republican Congressional Committee. For Republicans to maximize the positive political environment, they need to drastically close that gap -- and soon.

Finally, Democrats have had their fair share of recruiting successes despite the fact that they sit at 256 seats and are close to topped out in terms of seats. People like former Lt. Gov. John Carney (Del.) and Bethlehem Mayor John Callahan give Democrats genuine pickup opportunities.

Still, it's no coincidence that the increased public pronouncements by Republican leaders that the House is very much in play -- "If the GOP continues to capitalize on the Democrats' failures of the past year, the Republican Party will take control of the House in the next Congress," NRCC Chairman Pete Sessions (Texas) wrote in a fundraising email -- come as the political environment continues to produce recruits for them that will help them expand the playing field beyond its current dimensions.

What all of this likely means is that regardless of what happens in the national political landscape over the next 10 months, Republicans will at least have the pieces in place to take advantage of wave -- if one comes.

By Chris Cillizza  |  January 13, 2010; 4:24 PM ET
Categories:  House  
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Comments

Republican tide? Okay. But when the tide goes out, there's a lot of rotting, stinking fish stranded on the beach. The pendulum, a more appropriate metaphor, has yet to come back to center -- let alone swing left -- from its decades long arc to the right. Patience, Rs. Enjoy the ride to the left. You'll get your turn again, say, in 2030.

Y'all can watch the fickle weather vane for the changing winds, or you can beachcomb the rhythmic tides, but history moves cyclically forward glacially to the beat of the pendulum. Ignore it to your peril.

Posted by: optimyst | January 14, 2010 9:57 AM | Report abuse

That's what republicans admire, margaret. Also, guys like this:

inister who suggested assassinating Venezuela leader Hugo Chavez and nuking the U.S. State Department, the reputed follower of Jesus who blamed the 9/11 terrorist attacks and Hurricane Katrina on pagans, abortionists, feminists, gays and lesbians, is now attributing the Haitian earthquake to Haiti's "pact to the devil."

"Something happened a long time ago in Haiti and people might not want to talk about," Robertson said Tuesday on his 700 Club show. "They were under the heel of the French, you know Napoleon the third and whatever. And they got together and swore a pact to the devil. They said 'We will serve you if you will get us free from the prince.' True story. And so the devil said, 'Ok it's a deal.' And they kicked the French out. The Haitians revolted and got something themselves free. But ever since they have been cursed by one thing after another."

This is their warped version of a 'christian,' after all.

Posted by: drindl | January 14, 2010 9:50 AM | Report abuse

Why are we getting a hack USAtty like Mary Beth Buchanan put forward as a great catch for the GOP? She has her ambition going for her, but it really clouded her judgemnt as a prosecutor.

When Alberto Gonzales wnated more prosecutions of local Democrats before the elections, Buchanan was right there. When Sampson needed help with his list of US Attys to let go because of "performance problems" so they could be replaced with GOP attack dogs, Buchanan was right there to help him add some names.

Her prosecution in western Pennsylvania was exclusvely limited to high-profile prosectutions for porn (but not any big targets) and silly charges against every prominent Democrat that side of Happy Valley. There's leadership for you.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | January 14, 2010 9:30 AM | Report abuse

I think a lot of those tea baggers will lose in the primary and than run on the conservative ticket or stay home on election day and keep their supporters home. Those that win will be so ultra-conservative that they will turn off the general public.
 
==
 
Isn't it just phenomenal how they can't learn from failure?  Two guys won governorships by portraying themselves as moderates (at least one of them falsely), the Palinite lost the safest GOP district in the northeast.  So which model does the GOP follow?
 
THE ONE THAT LOST!
 
And they will continue the rightward lurches, becoming more extreme a more narrow, and losing one election after another.  Message from NY23?  Green-teeth *almost won*, not *he lost*.  This is what you get when you only listen to people who agree with you on absolutely everything, but the game plan is to purge increasingly extreme members, run the battiest Palinest nuttiest craziest people they can find, and spin their losses as wins .. but for ACORN, but for timing, but for deluded voters ...
 
I'm glad the GOP is marching over the cliff.  Good bloody riddance.  May they pass into history and be a footnote in future history books.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 14, 2010 1:45 AM | Report abuse

That Scott Brown beefcake spread has my gaydar chiming urgently. Cosmo? Looks more like a gay "twink" magazine.

Not many women go for shaved chests.

Funny ad hell that anyone thinks a Republican is going to win in Massachusetts. Put down that glass pipe and call NA.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 14, 2010 1:36 AM | Report abuse

I think a lot of those tea baggers will lose in the primary and than run on the conservative ticket or stay home on election day and keep their supporters home. Those that win will be so ultra-conservative that they will turn off the general public. Remember, the Republicans have failed to accomplish anything in the past few years, they do not have one constructive idea and their failure to deliver any vote for any of Obama's proposals will make them look as stubborn and uncompromising as they are. Look for small democratic gains in the fall. Nothing big like the last two elections but a small gain across the board. Maybe one or two in the senate and five to ten in the house.

Posted by: Opa2 | January 14, 2010 1:18 AM | Report abuse

Anyone else?

Posted by: JakeD | January 14, 2010 1:17 AM | Report abuse

For anyone who wants to actually follow the rules here: noacoler is BANNED poster Seattle Top / GoldAndTanzanite / Chris Fox. Our host, Mr. Cillizza, has asked that we ignore or shame him for repeatedly coming back after being banned. Please take that into consideration.

==

my god you've pasted this same pout in every active thread.

Am I your hobby, Jake? Or is this am honest to god OBSESSION? You say you maintain capacious files on me, a stranger you will never meet.

I hope that in your last moments on this earth, as you hesdrush into blackness, it sinks in hard how utterly pathetic you are. Whiney little fool.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 14, 2010 12:47 AM | Report abuse

Could pull some of the ladies from Coakley. Teabaggers might not care for it though. Unless they're in that category of phobics that are really in self denial, in which case they'll find the imagery strangely compelling. And given what they've named themselves, this could turn out to be a brilliant strategy for Brown.

.

Posted by: bsimon1 | January 13, 2010 11:22 PM
------------------------------
Too funny!

Seriously, Brown doesn't exactly look like the guy who would go to the mat to defend the constitution! Oh, Lord, I can't help myself. LOL.

May result in some Stay At Home votes.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | January 13, 2010 11:28 PM | Report abuse

"Wow! Think that will hurt him or help?"


Could pull some of the ladies from Coakley. Teabaggers might not care for it though. Unless they're in that category of phobics that are really in self denial, in which case they'll find the imagery strangely compelling. And given what they've named themselves, this could turn out to be a brilliant strategy for Brown.

.

Posted by: bsimon1 | January 13, 2010 11:22 PM | Report abuse

"I think The Fix missed one of the GOP's recruiting strategies. Here's Scott Brown's position paper, which partially exposes the package he's prepared to deliver to the Senate:"
-----------------------------
Wow! Think that will hurt him or help?

Posted by: 12BarBlues | January 13, 2010 11:19 PM | Report abuse

I think The Fix missed one of the GOP's recruiting strategies. Here's Scott Brown's position paper, which partially exposes the package he's prepared to deliver to the Senate:

http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/gawker/2009/09/scottbrown.jpg


hat tip to ddawd

Posted by: bsimon1 | January 13, 2010 11:13 PM | Report abuse

For anyone who wants to actually follow the rules here: noacoler is BANNED poster Seattle Top / GoldAndTanzanite / Chris Fox. Our host, Mr. Cillizza, has asked that we ignore or shame him for repeatedly coming back after being banned. Please take that into consideration.

Posted by: JakeD | January 13, 2010 11:04 PM | Report abuse

37th & O writes
"The repeal of Glass-Steagall was so stupid - you can thank your sell-out Bill Clinton for that one."

Not sure why you think I have any emotion invested in Bill Clinton, I never voted for him. I voted for Perot. Twice. Though I'm not too proud of the 2nd time. WJC's Glass-Steagall signature was a flaw of his triangulation strategy. For one, he apparently bought into the Greenspan theory that markets would police themselves. Whoops. I guess we can all agree that was a colossal phukcup, right? Turns out a little regulation can be a good thing. The beauty of our system of government is that mistakes can be corrected. Time for Washington to get crackin' on some of the deregulatory mistakes that've been made over the last 30 years.

37th, I'm surprised you see it my way. I never woulda thunk it.

Posted by: bsimon1 | January 13, 2010 10:54 PM | Report abuse

37th&O writes
"just because you post a link doesn't mean you are right."


I agree. Do you?

.

Posted by: bsimon1 | January 13, 2010 10:45 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, Senator Kerry, but the tea party's coming.

==

yeah there's a-gunna be a BACKLASH!!!!!

You just wait! You just wait!

(pause)

WAAAAAAAAH!!!

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 10:26 PM | Report abuse

12Bar 1-4-5: append hot mail dot com to my moniker and I'll share some secrets

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 9:54 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, Senator Kerry, but the tea party's coming.

Posted by: mock1ngb1rd | January 13, 2010 9:52 PM | Report abuse

Power cycling sometimes results in a new IP, not always. I have many strategies.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 9:24 PM
-------------------------
Not a trick question. I'm just figuring I might need to know someday. :-))

Posted by: 12BarBlues | January 13, 2010 9:27 PM | Report abuse

Oh and right on cue, there's one of our resident hysterics.

Read one if his posts for a good laugh but reading them regularly will make you ill. What would you guess his age to be?

Power cycling sometimes results in a new IP, not always. I have many strategies.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 9:24 PM | Report abuse

armpeg wrote,

I doubt very much that the uber--Socialist state of Mass. would elect a Republican, but then I didn't think Corzine would lose in NJ either, so there's still hope for the Americans who want to keep our country the way our founding fathers set it up.
-----------------------------------
Just an observation--the polls consistenly had Corzine down by 10-15 points, so it doesn't seem surprising that he lost.

Most of the polls have Coakley at 50-55% and Brown anywhere from 15 points below to tied. Obviously, Brown's support is very volatile. This is a really different polling situation than Corzine.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | January 13, 2010 9:24 PM | Report abuse

I doubt very much that the uber--Socialist state of Mass. would elect a Republican, but then I didn't think Corzine would lose in NJ either, so there's still hope for the Americans who want to keep our country the way our founding fathers set it up. Even if the Democrap Socialists keep this Senate seat though, they'll be losing by landslides in the midterm election, consitering how incompetent Obama is running things, and how the Democrap Socialists in Congress are pi**ing off the vast majority of the American people by trying to run things down their throats, they don't want, and screwing up our economy.
The Republicans stand an exellent chance to take control of the House of Representatives, despite the ahole Obama--worshippers here dreams of wishing otherwise.
They need 41 House seats to take control, which even James Carville has said is very possible. And it's happened before. In the 1994 midterm election the Republicans won 54 House seats and 8 Senate seats, and took control of both houses of congress. It can happen again, and for the sake of all Americans who don't want a Socialist Communist welfare state--which is what Obama and the Democrap Socialists have in mind to make us into--the real Americans better hope that they'll succeed.
(It's funny to see the Obama--worshippers on here whistling past the graveyard, all telling each other that it can't happen)

Posted by: armpeg | January 13, 2010 9:16 PM | Report abuse

Noacoler,

Does powering down and powering up the dsl modem get you a new IP? Or is there something else?

Posted by: 12BarBlues | January 13, 2010 9:16 PM | Report abuse

Does anyone believe that "Suzy" us new here?

I don't either.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 8:47 PM | Report abuse

As much as Obama has blamed Bush for everything, he has made the exact same critical mistake that Bush made. Bush tried to push comprehensive immigration, ignoring the fact that people just didn't want it. Obama continues to try and push Health Care reform, ignoring the fact that people just don't want it either. Both Bush and Obama could have tried for incremental reform, achieving some small victories along the way, and build on that. Obama would have had more time to devote to the economy and at least give people the impression he was concerned. But no, all he did was say that unemployment would not go over 8.5% and left it at that. Good thinking!

So now Obama has this mess in Massachusetts where the Senator who supposedly "championed" health care will be replaced by someone who will cast the 41st vote to block it. Once again, good thinking dems.

By the way, I'm certain that if Obama, Reid, and Pelosi could somehow make this albatross of a health care bill go away and save face at the same time, they would do it in a heartbeat. They'll never say this, of course. So maybe you dems shouldn't be worried so much over Brown winning in Mass. He would solve your problems by defeating health care and get you back on track (kinda).

Posted by: SuzyCcup | January 13, 2010 8:36 PM | Report abuse

Ummmm, what ideas do Republicans have for the economy?

Tax incentives to move jobs to India?

Tax cuts for billionaires?

Budget slicing?

Or no ideas at all?

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 8:26 PM | Report abuse

So 37 and ProCounsel are the same person? Posts are identical.

Posted by: drindl | January 13, 2010 8:24 PM | Report abuse

unemployed in massachusetts?

is money tight?

cold,angry??

anxious that under Depression Obama there are over 6 americans looking for a job for every 1 job opening??

are you retired, on medicare and angry that obamacare is going to STEAL your benefits--that YOU paid for all those years??

see, Obama and the Dems will NOT listen

unless you SLAP them at the polls

VOTE Republican
VOTE Brown

Posted by: ProCounsel | January 13, 2010 8:13 PM | Report abuse

When all is said and done - the only number that is going to mean anything is Obama's approval rating on the ECONOMY and right now that number is 40.

OUCH OUCH OUCH REALLY OUCH.

What is that sound ? It is the sound of Obama going back to Hyde Park.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 8:10 PM | Report abuse

"If the GOP continues to capitalize on the Democrats' failures of the past year, the Republican Party will take control of the House in the next Congress,"

Failures? CC, all you are doing is hyping the republican spin. That's not journalism; that's embarrassing.

Posted by: jasperanselm | January 13, 2010 4:38 PM
_____
Sorry to break the news, but RNC head Mike Steele kinda disagrees with Fix.

"Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele is dialing down expectations for his party's performance in this year's midterm elections, predicting that the GOP will not retake the House in 2010.

Speaking to Fox News host Sean Hannity Monday night, Steele suggested the Democrats' current 79-seat advantage in the chamber is too big a hurdle to overcome.

"We are beginning to do assessments on the individual races, but I think overall, given what this administration's proclivities are, we are going to see nice pick ups in the House," he said.

But asked directly if the party had a shot at taking over the House, Steele responded: "Not this year.""

http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2010/01/05/steele-gop-will-not-take-over-house-in-2010/

Posted by: broadwayjoe | January 13, 2010 7:50 PM | Report abuse

And you write like a third grader.

Maybe you should run for public office as a Republican. I understand they like people like you.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 7:43 PM | Report abuse

There is no legitimate, non-Rasmussen poll that shows any 2012 GOP contender within 23 points of 44. This horserace in 2012 narrative pushed in Drudge World is totally bogus.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | January 13, 2010 7:43 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe


What is that - some sort of voodoo


I wonder if Martha Coakley is some sort of wicken witch - from Salem.

I hear that the wicken religion is big up in Massachusetts - after a few witch trials the religion has survived up there

Coakley looks like a witch

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 7:39 PM | Report abuse

When all is said and done - the only number that is going to mean anything is Obama's approval rating on the ECONOMY and right now that number is 40.


OUCH OUCH OUCH REALLY OUCH.


What is that sound ? It is the sound of Obama going back to Hyde Park.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 7:35 PM | Report abuse

for _7: (Hope it works this time)

"The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own. But as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea, so tears run to a predestined end. Your suffering is over. Now you will find peace for eternity."

Posted by: broadwayjoe | January 13, 2010 7:29 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, rising republican tide.

Where?

A few red districts that voted Obama will go red again. BFD.

Retake the Senate? No. Retake the House? No. Retake the White House? Next time February has 28 days in a zero mod four year, maybe.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 7:27 PM | Report abuse

Just the fact that Scott Brown is where he is today is a MAJOR BLACK EYE for Obama - seriously.


Drop the health care bill -
.

Posted by: 3_thand0street | January 13, 2010 7:15 PM
___

What are you talking about, 3__? Brown's behind by 15 points according to the mainstream (non-Rasmussen Boston Globe poll. LOL. You've been drinking too much Drudge/Fix kool-aid.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | January 13, 2010 7:26 PM | Report abuse

Without a corresponding quote from the DCCC to keep it fair and balanced, he's just hyping one side over another? That's not journalism, that's hype and spin. I guess CC has just decided that it's better to hype the republicans in the Fix because that is where the greater energy is right now and he needs the hits to justify his blog.

I see the lessons of Frookim have been learned. So much for principles.

Posted by: jasperanselm | January 13, 2010 4:57 PM
__

It's just business as usual: false narratives (GOP comeback; Pawlenty in 2012), fake controversies (Reid), and never a positive mention of the 44th President of the United States.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | January 13, 2010 7:21 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe


How's that Free Trade Agreement working for you ?


How about all the trade deals of the Clintons ???

You can not be serious. Really. It is time for you guys to start admitting reality.

Just the fact that Scott Brown is where he is today is a MAJOR BLACK EYE for Obama - seriously.

Drop the health care bill -

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 7:15 PM | Report abuse

Obama's approval rating has held steady for a year, trivial movement, lately upward.

You're over your head, 37th. There are numbers. OUCH OUCH OUCH

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 7:14 PM | Report abuse

@Mr. _7 (to distinguish you from the original 37):

Research 2000 (Daily Kos) shows BHO at 56, doin' just fine.

Marist poll: BHO would best Phalin by 23 if the 2012 race were today.

Here's Fix coworker E.J. Dionne's take on reading too much into the upcoming midterm elections as "some" some are wont to do.

"The simple truth is that in midterm elections, no party can win without its base because turnout is lower than in presidential elections. Those who do vote are more committed to their parties and their ideological priorities.

Behind the 1994 Republican midterm sweep was a dispirited Democratic base unhappy about the failure of heath-care reform, grumpy about the economy and badly split over the North American Free Trade Agreement, for which President Bill Clinton pushed so hard. While Democrats stayed home, Republicans mobbed the polls and won races all the way down the ballot. It's the midterm rule: No base, no victory."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/03/AR2010010301813.html

We see a reference to the "tea party" movement above but no context. It is widely considered to be a racist proxy agenda (see Tea Party President Dale Robertson's n-word sign). Commentator Janeane Garofalo's highly regarded view of the teabaggers:

"Let's be very honest about what this is about. This is not about bashing Democrats. It's not about taxes. They have no idea what the Boston Tea Party was about. They don't know their history at all. It's about hating a black man in the White House. That is racism straight up. This is nothing but a bunch of teabagging rednecks"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janeane_Garofalo

Well done, Janeane...

Posted by: broadwayjoe | January 13, 2010 7:11 PM | Report abuse

bsimon has read the poll internals correctly.

See:

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/ezra-klein/2010/01/majority_of_poll_more_health-c.html

wherein the internals are linked and explained.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | January 13, 2010 7:06 PM | Report abuse

drindl


Go read the CBS poll in bsimon1's link and tell me that it supports his claims -


Seriously

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 6:57 PM | Report abuse

That accusation has become reflexive for you, so it doesn't matter.

Neither fo your hurt feelings. That you lack the intelligence to post about things as complex as politics is readily verifiable fact. You can't even understand the responses you get, so you just repeat your posts.

Can't understand ----> not smart enough.

Go to redstate. You'll be right at home.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 6:55 PM | Report abuse

House Democrats say the Democrats in the Senate are "squeeling like a pig" on the health care provisions.

It is better to just drop the whole thing.

Why sacrifice so many democrats to continue with an agenda which so many Americans have been clear that they do NOT want ???? It makes no sense.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 6:55 PM | Report abuse

he's hopeless, bsimon. you might have figured out by now that most of the folks with his mindset are. they don't want to know and so they will not. your facts are meaningless, they do not hear them.

Posted by: drindl | January 13, 2010 6:51 PM | Report abuse


Noacoler

Another "ad hominem" attack

You should be banned - oh you ARE banned.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 6:48 PM | Report abuse

37th, you aren't smart enough to post here.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 6:41 PM | Report abuse

bsimon1


DID YOU even read the CBS poll which was linked in the link you provided ???

REALLY GRIM FOR YOUR GUY OBAMA.

Obama's approval rating is SINKING FAST.

In addition, the CBS poll which you have confirms the numbers in the Gallup Poll - which state that Obama's approval/disapproval on health care policy handling is 20 points up-side-down !!!

If Obama was smart (which he claims he is) he would DROP THE HEALTH CARE BILL.

LETS SEE IF OBAMA IS SMART OR DUMB.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 6:25 PM | Report abuse

bsimon1


You are copping some attitude - and just because you post a link doesn't mean you are right.


Let me clue you in:


The American people DO NOT want this health care bill - it's pretty simple

If you do not agree, look at the polls in Massachusetts.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 6:11 PM | Report abuse

bsimon1


You do not understand - you are too delusional to believe anything other than Obama is doing a great job.

How many more terrorists do you think we should send to Yemen??


Haven't heard Obama apologize for that.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 6:08 PM | Report abuse

Who wants to bet that the repub initially wins in mass but that after several recounts, conducted under the auspices of Acorn and the black panthers, that the liberal ends up with a very slim margin of victory.

Posted by: Moonbat | January 13, 2010 6:06 PM | Report abuse

We can buy the nuke technology from Canada, the way India and China do.

It may be that leapin is right that the major political opposition to nukes is from within the D side of the aisle.
But Chu is a proponent of nukes. There is a chance we can move on this.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | January 13, 2010 6:00 PM | Report abuse

Obama says in a couple of days, maybe a week, he'll begin to consider giving a speech about helping out Haiti.

In Boston the dems have warned they can't seat the winner of the election until after the health care vote. Unless the lib wins in which case she can have it right away.

Today rangel said the health care siuation is in trouble. Yesterday dudd Said it is hanging by a thread. Ran out of graft?

The state of our union after one year of liberal governing is broke, terrorized, disfunctional, corrupt, ineffective and digging deeper.

What did you expect? I sure Hope this Changes soon.

Posted by: Moonbat | January 13, 2010 5:58 PM | Report abuse

"Nuclear power plants."

Nukes should be a component of energy system reform. Of course, nuke power is also the most expensive power, so there's a pretty hefty up front & ongoing cost. And you have to figure out what to do with the toxic goo, or invest in a new kind of nuke power that doesn't produce bomb ingredients as 'waste'. The problems can be solved, but it will cost money. Will private industry make that investment, or should gov't step in? Particularly in terms of pursuing technology with lower / less toxic waste, is that private industry has the money to invest in up front without a known payout? Or will they play it like defense contractors & demand upfront payments from the gov't to do their research?


Posted by: bsimon1 | January 13, 2010 5:54 PM | Report abuse

37th, did you not read the link I posted?

The disapproval numbers are split, roughly evenly, between people who think the legislation goes too far & those who think it doesn't go far enough.

Think this through several times to see if you can understand: half of the people dissatisfied with health care reform think it doesn't do enough reform. Take that half and add it to the people who are happy with the reform and you get a majority that wants reform and thinks the current reform is adequate or doesn't go far enough.

Do you understand, or are you beyond hope?

.

Posted by: bsimon1 | January 13, 2010 5:49 PM | Report abuse

Not to mention cleaning up the environment, promoting new technologies & addressing the trade deficit by getting us off the foreign oil habit.


Posted by: bsimon1
------------------------------------------
Nuclear power plants. Lefties are the ones stopping them from being built. All the liberals on both coasts equipped with beanie propeller hats hooked into the power grid cannot produce enough power for our needs.

Posted by: leapin | January 13, 2010 5:47 PM | Report abuse

The lib thinks of society, not self, and so when they error, they do it under stress, in accidental fashion, and with no lasting significance — not like their selfish Neanderthal cousin conservatives, for whom transgression is a valuable window into their flawed souls. Bushisms became a media pastime, but no one suggests that a president who says Cinco de Quatro, or 57 states, or references the “Austrian” language is a Dan Quayle wrestling with potato.

Posted by: leapin | January 13, 2010 5:40 PM | Report abuse


Bsimon1


The democrats are talking to themselves, trying to talk themselves into, their continued efforts in health care.


The country has spoken.


Here is TODAY'S POLL


Gallup poll

Do you approve of the way Obama is handling health care policy


Approve 37%


Disapprove 58%

OUCH OUCH OUCH


The bottom has fallen out of Obama's health care program


Obama should withdraw the health care bill - and enter into negotiations to create a truly bi-partisan bill.


Obama is looking worse and worse by the day.


This past month has been HORRIBLE FOR OBAMA -

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Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 5:34 PM | Report abuse

"If I was a democrat, why would I want to run this year???"


To finish the job left undone by the current health care reform.

Majorities of Americans think the reform bill is only adequate or doesn't go far enough in:
1) covering Americans
2) regulating insurance companies
3) controlling costs

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/ezra-klein/2010/01/majority_of_poll_more_health-c.html

Given the dearth of progress in regulating wall street, Dems might want to run on that platform too.

I've yet to see any productive proposals from the GOP on those subjects. Not to mention cleaning up the environment, promoting new technologies & addressing the trade deficit by getting us off the foreign oil habit.

Posted by: bsimon1 | January 13, 2010 5:30 PM | Report abuse

If I was a democrat, why would I want to run this year???


Seriously folks


Why would anyone want to take the hit for Obama's dumb mistakes and overreaching ???


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Posted by: 37thand0street | January 13, 2010 5:17 PM | Report abuse

I don't think this is some great wave election, but I do think there will be some regression to the mean. Democrats have massive majorities and it's just difficult to maintain that.

Posted by: DDAWD


Agreed. It's way too early to draw any conclusions. If the economy continues to move up and the jobs start to come back by election time, the Reps will have nothing to run on. In all likelihood it'll be a push, somewhere in the middle.

Posted by: jasperanselm | January 13, 2010 5:10 PM | Report abuse

Jasper, Pete Sessions said that, not CC.

I understand that, Mark, but parroting Sessions is not journalism. It's echoing the NRCC spin. Where's the critical analysis of the remark?

Posted by: jasperanselm | January 13, 2010 5:05 PM | Report abuse

"Jasper, Pete Sessions said that, not CC. Ezra Klein has argued that this was a terrific first year of an Administration in terms of successes. I suppose the Ds will pick up on that."

Problem is that these accomplishments are of varying popularity. You have the popular stimulus, but you also have unpopular health care, bailouts, and Afghanistan escalation. And who knows how popular the stimulus will be if the job situation doesn't improve by election time.

I do think the health care bill will end up being more popular once it is passed. Obama will have more freedom to talk it up more and that will most likely overshadow the main stream media's attempts to knock it down.

I don't think this is some great wave election, but I do think there will be some regression to the mean. Democrats have massive majorities and it's just difficult to maintain that.

Posted by: DDAWD | January 13, 2010 5:02 PM | Report abuse

Zip it, troll. You're not on topic.

Posted by: jasperanselm | January 13, 2010 5:01 PM | Report abuse

Monday You wrote that the national environment favored Republicsns. Today it isn't particularly friendly.

I think you're just making all this up.

Posted by: Noacoler | January 13, 2010 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Without a corresponding quote from the DCCC to keep it fair and balanced, he's just hyping one side over another? That's not journalism, that's hype and spin. I guess CC has just decided that it's better to hype the republicans in the Fix because that is where the greater energy is right now and he needs the hits to justify his blog.

I see the lessons of Frookim have been learned. So much for principles.

Posted by: jasperanselm | January 13, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

At least Mr. Cillizza is not bringing up Dingy Harry Reid anymore.

Posted by: JakeD | January 13, 2010 4:53 PM | Report abuse

@ddawd: or nawlins.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | January 13, 2010 4:52 PM | Report abuse

Jasper, Pete Sessions said that, not CC. Ezra Klein has argued that this was a terrific first year of an Administration in terms of successes. I suppose the Ds will pick up on that.

I cannot tell much from Austin - a D enclave in an R state.

I do listen to POTUS on my 'puter while I pretend to work and a series of random voter interviews today caught my attention. The interviewees were all anxious to see the health bill passed and signed. Trouble was, I was working before it caught my attention so I have no idea where these people were, except that they were not in the deep south or New Yawk or Bastan.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | January 13, 2010 4:51 PM | Report abuse

He's quoting the NRCC chair. Nothing wrong with that.

I do wish there was something from the Democratic locker room, though.

But wow, 50 primaries in contested districts. Not good if CfG decides to get involved and push unelectable candidates to the generals.

Posted by: DDAWD | January 13, 2010 4:45 PM | Report abuse

"If the GOP continues to capitalize on the Democrats' failures of the past year, the Republican Party will take control of the House in the next Congress,"

Failures? CC, all you are doing is hyping the republican spin. That's not journalism; that's embarrassing.

Posted by: jasperanselm | January 13, 2010 4:38 PM | Report abuse

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