Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

TARP troubles afflict Republican incumbents in primary fights

When the House and Senate approved the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) in the fall of 2008, it was widely cast by leaders of both parties as a necessary step to keep the economy from tumbling into disaster.

Fast forward 18 months, however, and that TARP vote, which passed the Senate 74-25 and the House 263-171, has become a political millstone for a handful of House and Senate Republicans who voted for it.

"Republicans, and many non-Republicans, strongly believe that government should not punish corporate success with high taxes, or reward corporate failure with taxpayer-paid bailouts," said Republican consultant Jon Lerner who does work for the fiscally conservative Club for Growth. "The TARP vote is the antithesis of this governing philosophy, and GOP primary voters are not in a forgiving mood these days."

The poster child for that lack of forgiveness is Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison who watched as Gov. Rick Perry (R) used her support for TARP to cast her as out-of-step with average Texans in their primary fight earlier this year.

Perry took to describing Hutchison as "Kay Bailout" on the campaign trail and the after-action reports of the race largely credited that single vote with giving Perry the foothold he needed to make the case that Hutchison was not the fiscal conservative she claimed to be.

"It was a pretty darn big thing to overcome" said one strategist close to the Hutchison campaign. "Voters are pissed about it and they don't really know the difference between TARP and [the economic] stimulus [package]."

Hutchison is far from alone in her struggle to explain and defend her TARP vote.

In Utah, Sen. Bob Bennett (R) faces considerable electoral peril in advance of the May 8 state Republican convention, trouble born -- at least in part -- from his vote for TARP.

The Club for Growth has been leading the charge, seeking to coalesce opposition to Bennett in advance of the state convention. An ad sponsored by the Club that ran earlier this month in the state begins by noting that Bennett "voted to bail out Wall Street".

While the votes are still being counted from Tuesday's district-level caucuses (um, count faster!), the reporting out of Utah suggested a strong anti-Bennet sentiment. "Support was not coalescing behind any Bennett challenger, but there was a strong 'anybody-but-Bennett' sentiment," wrote the Salt Lake City Tribune's Robert Gehrke of the caucuses.

Bennett is clearly in the deepest TARP-caused trouble but both South Carolina Rep. Gresham Barrett and Arizona Sen. John McCain are also being forced to defend that vote in contested primaries this year.

Barrett, who is embroiled in a four-way primary fight in the race to replace retiring Gov. Mark Sanford (R), is the focus of an ad campaign funded by the conservative Americans for Job Security that seeks to make political hay of his vote. "Have you noticed that when Washington politicians vote for big spending and bailout it always ends up sinking us," says the ad's narrator who goes on to urge viewers to call Barrett and tell him "no more bailouts". (If you need evidence of the level of animosity about TARP, watch this clip from a Tea Party rally in the state last spring.)

And in Arizona, former Rep. J.D. Hayworth, who lost his bid for re-election in 2006, is trying to make McCain answerable for his TARP vote.

McCain, while not walking entirely away from the vote, has said that he was "misled" into believing that the vast majority of the money would go to rescue the housing market not the banking industry.

"They turned around and switched from trying to address the housing market to bailing out the financial institutions on Wall Street," McCain told "Meet the Press" host David Gregory during a recent appearance.

As Hutchison, Bennett, Barrett and McCain have found, it's tough to argue a negative when defending the TARP vote. That is, it's difficult to convince people that had TARP not passed the economy could have collapsed -- leaving things far worse in the country than they are today.

The collapse didn't happen -- perhaps because of TARP -- and Republicans who supported the package are now running scared from it.

It's too late for Hutchison. But, as one senior Republican strategist noted, there have been a "number of votes this Congress which called for abolition of TARP [and] preventing it from going to auto companies that give Members in a general more than enough cover.

The source added, however: "No question this is a liability in a Republican primary."

By Chris Cillizza  |  March 25, 2010; 3:03 PM ET
Categories:  House , Senate  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Dan Coats, the anti-Obama
Next: Mitt Romney rolls out 2010 endorsements

Comments

Club for Growth can come and work for the DNC -- they would also like to vote out the 124 Republicans who voted for TARP.

Are we sure CforG isn't a front group for the Democrats?

Posted by: margaretmeyers | March 27, 2010 5:42 PM | Report abuse

Republicans are so dumb.

Posted by: mw09 | March 26, 2010 8:53 PM | Report abuse

Anyone that has even a rudimentary knowledge of history knows there never has been or ever will be a business or country too big to fail.

Posted by: OldCoot1 | March 26, 2010 8:42 PM | Report abuse

WillSeattle wrote: "We shall never surrender!

For the America-hating Republicants must be crushed with all our blood, toils, and sweat!"

---------------------

I'm with you, 100%! It is impossible for me to describe how I despise and detest the republicans who, through their greed and double dealing, have brought the country to its knees. First, they sent America's production capacity to China, lock, stock, and barrel, in order to fatten themselves like swine on the cheap Chinese labor, while selling the Chinese junk poison to us here in America. This effectively killed our factories and put the people who used to work in them on the street. Then the filthy republicans encouraged, and passed laws that allowed the exportation of American IT jobs to the Indian software H1-B pirates. The Indians came here to entice American employers to fire their workers and ship the jobs to the low-paid Indians in their Hyderabad holes and warrens. Thus, the swine republicans killed the American IT jobs as well.

And now, to crown it all, the lousy republican rats in the Senate conspire to deny the unemployed in America extensions of their unemployment benefits which they receive because the republicans sold their jobs overseas. Have they no shame, these republican criminals, traitors and destroyers of our country? I cannot adequately put into words the white-hot intensity with which I hate the republican traitors and thieves, who use "free enterprise" as a cover for extortion, theft, and robbery. With all my heart I wish I had been born into a time and place when they hauled such greedy bastards through the streets, strung them up naked by their feet and beat them to death like the dogs they are.

Posted by: RichardHode | March 26, 2010 8:32 PM | Report abuse

McCain was "misled"? He's spent enough time in DC to know how it works, so how could he have been "misled"? It's scary what else he could have been "misled" about in the run-up to the Nov '08 election.

Posted by: Roofelstoon | March 26, 2010 5:34 PM | Report abuse

This isn't something new Republicans always run from their votes. They increased the size of government when they had both the Congress and the White House. They were for nation building in Iraq and put the country into a huge debt and now that they don't have either the Congress or the White House and they suddenly had an epiphany and are against spending. Come on only hardcore Republicans are buying what they are selling. Most people know that Republicans are nothing more than hypocrites.

Posted by: info4 | March 26, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

And we wonder why Republican elected officials seem like narrow-minded ideologues. The core problem is that their base won't elect anything else.

Posted by: jeffwacker | March 26, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

And we wonder why Republican elected officials seem like narrow-minded ideologues. The core problem is that their base won't elect anything else.

Posted by: jeffwacker | March 26, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

37thand0street wrote:
Obama's problem is that his health care plan is ONE GIANT GIVE-AWAY TO THE INSURANCE COMPANIES AND THE PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES.
-----
Wait, so as a teabagger, after Obama deliberately crafted a very moderate plan (the individual mandate was conceived by a Republican think tank and basically means there will be no freeloaders on the system except those who are poor)--thereby offending his base which wants single payer or a public option--NOW your position is that the plan is too friendly to big business?

Either you are simply a two-faced propagandist or deeply confused.

Posted by: scientist1 | March 26, 2010 3:22 PM | Report abuse

It amazes me how many people have drunk the Right wing Kool-Aid and refuse to admit all the problems we have today can be traced to thier fuzzy philosophy. Cutting taxes means higher deficits. Two wars w/o raising taxes means higher deficits. Simple math. But somehow its all the "liberals" fault for the deficit.

Repugnicans have NOTHING to show for all their obstructionist efforts unless you count a shrinking middle class and ever larger population below the poverty line.

Posted by: atroncale1 | March 26, 2010 2:07 PM | Report abuse

We shall fight them on the beaches.

We shall fight them in the primaries.

We shall never surrender!

For the America-hating Republicants must be crushed with all our blood, toils, and sweat!

USA! USA! USA!

Posted by: WillSeattle | March 26, 2010 2:04 PM | Report abuse

MORAL HAZARD………Hank Paulson (President Bush’s Secretary of the Treasure) defined the GOP best in his speech on “morale hazard. For the record per Hank Paulson, the catechism of “moral hazard” is, “If you bail someone out of a problem they themselves caused what incentive do they have the next time not to make the same mistake.” America ask yourself, who in their right mind would vote for the group that drove the country into the ditch for eight (8) years, and now two (2) years later they still have “No New Ideas” …. “No New Ideas”? Simple!……….. Simple!……… Simple!…… Simple!……….. Simple!……… Simple!…… Simple! Obama……...2008…………..2012……….…..2016………..….2020………..…2024…..FOREVER!

Posted by: weeksmith | March 26, 2010 1:57 PM | Report abuse

Once upon a time, "gay" meant happy.

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 26, 2010 1:04 PM | Report abuse

katem wrote: "Think calling them "teabaggers" has sexual conotation? how about the fact that in England, "Going Rogue", the title of Palin's book, means having unprotected anal sex, LOL!"

Now that is absolutely hilarious! Thank you!

Posted by: swatkins1 | March 26, 2010 12:29 PM | Report abuse

EarlC (post below) asks some of the better questions, inter alia:

"The big situation developing is the new banking regulation bill. Will it have any teeth? Will the Republicans end up backing the failed banking institutions?"


My guess at the answer to the first is "no", the regulator will be placed within the structure of the Fed (which is a major source of the problem)... the fox is asked to watch the hens.

I'm betting too many Republicans in Congress (and a lot of Democrats, too) are too scared of and/or beholden to the big Banksters to do anything BUT carry their water... so the answer to the second question is, unfortunately, "yes".

Posted by: Iconoblaster | March 26, 2010 12:10 PM | Report abuse

First the GOP was taken over by the nutcase Neocons... who are as addicted to foreign intervention as any Wilsonian Democrat (contrary to traditional Republican philosophy), and more in love with a foreign flag than our own (contrary to George Washington's sound and famous advice about entangling alliances).

Now its the Teabaggers, some mad as hell, (about various things), others certain as sunshine that the CIA did 9/11, and/or that Obama is secretly a Marxist Muslim mutant changeling from China, with a Walmart birth certificate.

Were ALL the brains of this party buried with Bill Buckley? If we don't get some adult supervision in the Republican party real soon, I'm about ready to to give up on it.

Posted by: Iconoblaster | March 26, 2010 12:03 PM | Report abuse

The Republicans were against it before they were for it.... or rather they voted against it before they tried to claim credit for it. Just more of the same ol' same ol' hypocrisy from the GOP buffoons.

Posted by: rurik | March 26, 2010 11:48 AM | Report abuse

..."Wow America have the Republicans/Blew it Bush Administration RUINED YOU BUT GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOD!

..."No wonder America's in the MESS it's in thanks to the REpublicans who lost 8 and a half Million jobs, under their boy blew it bush, then left you and I a record debt/deficit/BILL $1.5 TRILLION...."APPRECIATE IT! But my favorite fact folks about the Republicans under their boy blew it bush did such a good job for you they left town, the Pew Poll said, "WITH THE LOWEST JOB APPROVAL RATING IN THE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES PRESIDENCY 20 PERCENT/FACT!

...So be sure now you RUn and vote Republican again...

..."APPRECIATE IT!

Posted by: ztcb41 | March 26, 2010 11:45 AM | Report abuse

And the purity purging continues. Who will be left standing when the intelligent conservatives have all been "purified" out? Cute.

Posted by: greenmansf | March 26, 2010 11:16 AM | Report abuse

TARP is history. Most people cannot separate out the Republicans from the Democrats. The big situation developing is the new banking regulation bill. Will it have any teeth? Will the Republicans end up backing the failed banking institutions? The Party of No may not be finished with its anti-Obama agenda at any cost. America is truly in the crosshairs on Sarah Palin's map. She may be saying that she is targeting various vulnerable Democrats, but her targets are American soil. Her lack of honest intellectual capacity coupled with a sizable part of the electorate that seem to have a hatred of intelligent people is a volatile mix. I have said for almost two years now that the rightwing hate machine is stirring up images of the French Revolution, not a pretty sight. Those rightwing radical politicians who are stirring up the radical right also live in those mansions and have those big cushy jobs. We need to tone down the inflammatory rhetoric and return to a civility in government. There will be days when one wins and days when one loses. Such is life. It always seems to be unfair to those who lose. It is time to grow up and be adults in out politics.

Posted by: EarlC | March 26, 2010 10:44 AM | Report abuse

Are you referring to Mr. Cillizza?

"chris by attacking the republicans over and over again...
you show us that you indeed can bend over backwards for them...
no matter what..."

Posted by: DwightCollins | March 26, 2010 6:11 AM

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 26, 2010 10:37 AM | Report abuse

to the corner: think calling them "teabaggers" has sexual conotation? how about the fact that in England, "Going Rogue", the title of Palin's book, means having unprotected anal sex, LOL!

Posted by: katem1 | March 26, 2010 9:21 AM | Report abuse

Republikkklans constantly accuse Democrats of being for big government. Can anyone tell me just what the Republikkklans have done in the past 50 years to reduce the size of government? Bush and Cheney created the biggest government agency to combat "terrorism" in our lifetime. They filled it with unqualified campaign donors and incompetent friends and it still is suffering from incompetence. Homeland Security is so labeled to make us feel good, but they cannot even coordinate air travel with any sense of competence and intelligence.
What part of government has the Republikklan party made smaller?
I know they made New Orleans smaller by letting people drown and ignoring them until the whole world said WTF is Bush doing? I know they made Iraq smaller by bombing the hell out of the innocent citizens and destroying their lives. But what have they made smaller in our government?
The only thing I can identity as smaller is the brain capacity of today's Republicans, socalled leaders and the drones who believe them. Thank God for TARP or we'd have lost every cent of the retirement money our government told us to save. Remember Bush's personal "health accounts" and "retirement accounts". If we had listened to him we'd have nothing at all. We could save in a health account all of our working lives and blow it all on one significant illness.

Posted by: papafritz571 | March 26, 2010 8:17 AM | Report abuse

37thandOst is a complete fool. It has finally awakened after having been asleep during the dictatorship of that moron w which ruined this country. Now the left has to make things whole again.

Posted by: davidsawh | March 26, 2010 8:11 AM | Report abuse

Obama's main problem - if he is going to try to run this year's elections against the health insurance companies.


Obama's problem is that his health care plan is ONE GIANT GIVE-AWAY TO THE INSURANCE COMPANIES AND THE PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES.

So there is a basic deception in Obama's plan.


This is par for Obama - the whole thing rests on a central DECEPTION AND SET OF LIES.


Go for it.

.

.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 26, 2010 7:06 AM | Report abuse

Much has changed recently on the political scene - things in Washington used to be civil - but the democratic party has gotten UGLY.

Rep. Clyburn - he is up on CNN this week saying the opposition is "not about health care, its about race"

NOW we have a national party leader who has basically said ON NATIONAL TELEVISION - IF YOU DO NOT AGREE WITH US, YOU ARE A RACIST.

The democratic party is completely out of control.

When in the history of this country has there been so much INTIMIDATION POLITICS??? This is what Obama has brought to our country. This kind of behavior has NOTHING TO DO WITH THE PROMISES OF 2008 - A POST-RACIAL, POST-PARTISAN AMERICAN.

Obama has COMPLETELY FORGOTTEN WHY HE WAS ELECTED.


Obama has gotten UGLY - the democrats are UGLY - and there is NO EXCUSE FOR IT.


.


.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 26, 2010 6:51 AM | Report abuse

chris by attacking the republicans over and over again...
you show us that you indeed can bend over backwards for them...
no matter what...

Posted by: DwightCollins | March 26, 2010 6:11 AM | Report abuse

DDAWD, there's more reading on this topic int the morning papers:

http://capitalgainsandgames.com/blog/bruce-bartlett/1601/groupthink-right-would-make-stalin-proud by Bruce Bartlett

and this from the Times about Senator Bennett:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/26/us/politics/26bennett.html?hp

and here's Krugman
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/26/opinion/26krugman.html

Bartlett writes about being fired from National Center for Policy Analysis for the same reason as Frum. "Since, he is no longer affiliated with AEI, I feel free to say publicly something [Frum] told me in private a few months ago. He asked if I had noticed any comments by AEI "scholars" on the subject of health care reform. I said no and he said that was because they had been ordered not to speak to the media because they agreed with too much of what Obama was trying to do."

Posted by: margaretmeyers | March 26, 2010 4:22 AM | Report abuse

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/ezra-klein/2010/03/conservatives_reject_frum-ism.html

Klein wrote a good column on the cognitive dissonance between the politics of having to claim how liberal and extreme this bill is and how conservative this bill actually is. Instead of trying to engage in real negotiation and trying to advance their own causes, they decided to take the political route and block it.

That strategy failed.

Part of what Frum was doing was engaging in retrospection. This strategy failed, so might it have been a better idea to take the other path? But time and time again, Republicans have been completely unwilling to engage in this kind of introspection. Even after the 2008 election and even after this. Say what you will about Michael Steele, but at least he's kind of trying,(well, tried) to change the direction of the party, but has faced the reality of trying to get conservatives to...change. Frum did the same and he got fired. Same with Chris Buckley for endorsing Obama (mainly a rejection of Palin)

Who knows, maybe the recent spate of election wins are giving Republicans a false sense of strength. But two of the elections were gubernatorial wins in Virginia and New Jersey. There is nothing remarkable about winning the governorship in those states. Republicans win there all the time. Scott Brown was definitely a reason to crow, but the guy is pretty liberal. Of course, Republicans should use these victories for their own advantage and tout their success publicly, but they can't get so caught up in their hype that they can keep skewing to...wherever they are skewing. Electing two moderate governors in two semi-blue states and a liberal Republican in a special election in January is good, but isn't a license to go batsh*t crazy with the teabaggers.

But as Frum shows, this type of thought isn't tolerated. Bad news for Republicans. Let's see how this plays out in November. Who knows? These guys are politicians, so if there's anything they know, it's politics. So perhaps they think 100% obstruction and co-opting the teabaggers is good politics.

I don't, but I'm just an average voter. I'm no politician,

Posted by: DDAWD | March 25, 2010 11:07 PM | Report abuse

Do the GOP, Club for Growth and the TEA Party actually intend to vote out 124 Repulican legislators?

That sounds like the DNC plan for 2010 and 2012. Club for Growth has got the wrong name, and they can come and work for the DNC any time.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | March 25, 2010 9:30 PM | Report abuse

I'm amazed that the Republicans would attack Senators and Congressmen of their own party for supporting a program that A) was created at the behest of a Republican President and B) was central to saving our country from a serious depression.

I realize that the Republicans are against using government as the all-purpose multi-tool, but economists agreed that Federal dollars now was the BEST way to slow our slide to the financial edge. The program worked and the Republicans should be glad it did.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | March 25, 2010 9:19 PM | Report abuse

The democrats are fanning the flames of HATE in this country - by the way they talk about the Tea Party Movement.


It really is sad.

The Media is unbelievable - almost never calling out the democrats on their SEXUAL SLURS.


,

.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 25, 2010 9:12 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe


Rasmussen was right in Massachusetts.

You are wrong all the time.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 25, 2010 9:10 PM | Report abuse

Poor lonely Ped.

Posted by: Moonbat | March 25, 2010 8:49 PM | Report abuse

Frum shouldn't have been surprised. He should have started cleaning out his desk the moment he wrote the truth.

Not only did he tell the truth about GOP strategies, but he admitted that his party was in the wrong. He'll be lucky if he's not murdered. When was the last time the GOP admitted an error? When was the last time they allowed themselves to learn from a mistake?

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 8:34 PM | Report abuse

@kelly14: Rasmussen is always far from all other polls and always in a direction favoring Republicans. Their methodolgies are bogus and their questions are vey biased.

So they predicted the obvious in 2008. So what. They exist only for lying GOP pundits to quote.

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 8:31 PM | Report abuse

"And haven't you learned that nobody takes a Rasmussen poll seriously?"
_______

Noacoler, Rasmussen correctly predicted that Obama would win in 2008, much to the chagrin of my Republican friends. I remember it well because I teased with his polling numbers then. I wouldn't categorically discount Rasmussen.

Posted by: Kelly14 | March 25, 2010 8:18 PM | Report abuse

Nobody outside Drudge/FixWorld cites Rasmussen. Politico.com's recent article destroyed what was left of that pollster's credibility.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | March 25, 2010 8:15 PM | Report abuse

It didn't take long for Frum to get major blowback for his truthful "Waterloo" statement about the GOP. Sad.
_______________

"The American Enterprise Institute (AEI) the land of Dick Cheney speak just couldn't handle the truth ... so they squeezed this out of Mr. Frum. Here is the text of his "resignation" letter to AEI President Arthur Brooks:

'Dear Arthur,
This will memorialize our conversation at lunch today. Effective immediately, my position as a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute is terminated. I appreciate the consideration that delays my emptying of my office until after my return from travel next week. Premises will be vacated no later than April 9.

I have had many fruitful years at the American Enterprise Institute, and I do regret this abrupt and unexpected conclusion of our relationship.

Very truly yours,
David Frum ' "

Did you catch the "abrupt and unexpected"?

Posted by: broadwayjoe | March 25, 2010 8:12 PM | Report abuse

Things that can be counted use "fewer," things that are infinitely subdivisible in perception get "less."

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 6:51 PM

Good point, Noacoler. You can never count on democrats, so I'll always use "less" for them. Thanks.

Posted by: SuzyCcup | March 25, 2010 8:06 PM | Report abuse

I doubt that one person in a hundred has ever heard of the alternate meaning of "teabagger.". To call this sexual namecalling is absurd.

But hardly anyone alive doesn't know the meaning and intent of "niggger."

not even children on a playground

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 8:01 PM | Report abuse

The democrats are the ones who are really guilty of HATE SPEECH - look at how they talk about the Tea Party Movement - with unrestrained SEXUAL SLURS.

Then they say they can't handle a few bad words.

The democrats are ridiculous - they are like little children on a playground.

.

.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 25, 2010 7:46 PM | Report abuse

"Fast forward 18 months, however, and that TARP vote, which passed the Senate 74-25 and the House 263-171, has become a political millstone for a handful of House and Senate Republicans who voted for it."

when did 196 become a 'handful'?

Posted by: drindl | March 25, 2010 7:15 PM | Report abuse

And haven't you learned that nobody takes a Rasmussen poll seriously?

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 6:52 PM | Report abuse

"Fewer people," 37th, not "less people."

Less water, less air, fewer chairs.

Things that can be counted use "fewer," things that are infinitely subdivisible in perception get "less."

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 6:51 PM | Report abuse

Rasmussen says 55% of Americans want to REPEAL the health care bill.

Obama has a little bump in the polls.

Once the American People start to realize what is really in the bill - and that premiums are not going to go down, then Obama and the democrats will have really hurt themselves.


The health care plan is going to place a DRAG ON HIRING.


The democrats do not understand that - you have to tell them that the costs of hiring are now HIGHER - so employers want to hire LESS PEOPLE - then they start to get it.


.

.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 25, 2010 6:44 PM | Report abuse

Why feel sorry for Frum? The AEI thing wasn't a paying gig, he didn't lose his job, it's just an honorary membership in some generator of conservative apologia.

Don't forget that it was Frum who coined "Axis of Evil," and it's Frum who still believes in that free market nonsense.

Yeah he had the temerity to tell Republicans what the other 99.99% of the world already knows: they blew it. I mean, whoop, wow, that really took guts.

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 6:43 PM | Report abuse

Actually, dawd, I feel kind of sorry for frum... kind of. he was just speaking the truth -- but they like to shoot the messenger. and it means that they will continue to hew as far right as possible, which is bad for their party and will drive away independents, but I don't like it because it's also bad for the country and will likely result in people getting killed.

This 'open carry' rally in NOVA in April is on the anniversary of Timothy McVeigh's terrorist act -- that they scheduled it on that day tells you where the tea/R party is headed-- open advocacy of violence.

Posted by: drindl | March 25, 2010 6:28 PM | Report abuse

http://www.frumforum.com/aei-says-goodbye

hehe, David Frum got the axe.

Posted by: DDAWD | March 25, 2010 6:13 PM | Report abuse


With so many democrats worried about their elections in November, Obama showed how much he really cares by going to ..... Iowa


To work on his own re-election.

It really is a joke.


.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 25, 2010 6:03 PM | Report abuse

I guess the democrats were not happy with the Tea Party Movement - making it clear that there will be opposition in November to the health care votes.

The democrats want everyone to forget.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 25, 2010 5:54 PM | Report abuse

Nobody's forgotten who created the downturn, zouk ol' shutterbug, nor has anyone forgotten whose economic stimulus kept it from turning into another Great Depression.

How's the "professional photography" thing going. Nice to know you're "willing to learn," but are you getting any gigs? No? Pity!

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 5:35 PM | Report abuse

As usual. The liberals are turning a downturn into a great depression.

I got a leftist plan. Raise taxes. Grow government. Extend bureaucracy. Stomp out small biz. Borrow. Borrow. Spend ^3. Lie. Cheat. Steal. Bribe. Bully. Lie sone more. Tax tax tax. Rename a few things. Rely on weak kneed press and sycophant base to cover ( useful idiots). Praise chairman zero.

Posted by: Moonbat | March 25, 2010 5:06 PM | Report abuse

This is proof that the only real bipartisan sport in D.C. is giving taxpayer's money to special interest industries.

Posted by: newbeeboy | March 25, 2010 4:53 PM | Report abuse

This is great news, no matter how hard they tried, their base didn't forget who really bailed out the banks and bought the auto companies.

Posted by: soapm | March 25, 2010 4:42 PM | Report abuse

The White House won't throw stones at the banking bailout.. their minions called the winner and losers..

Posted by: newbeeboy | March 25, 2010 4:35 PM | Report abuse

Ok, time to get serious,
last post for today...

The stock market is going bananas.
Everyone is piling money on, trying to get in on the betting, even at this level.

People have been warning about corrections, even irrational exuberance. Well what about the shadow housing problem, jobs coming back?

The people who bet their lives don't share your concern. The world is betting heavily again on America's economic future...

...even as Republicans are pretending it is not happening.

Can this be real? Seriously, are Republicans capable of realizing that the elections are pretty far off?

If Republicans can not find some way
to destroy confidence in this recovery,
they will just have to forget about the
Republican Rising!

Posted by: shrink2
----------------------------------------

One day they want to be statists...the next day, only of the stock market is up, then they want to be good old capitalists.

Posted by: leapin | March 25, 2010 4:18 PM | Report abuse

"But what I can't beleive, what is *really* surreal, is that a lot of these Rs running against tarp are also against regulation of the financial industry, to keep a meltdown from happening again. It's so insanely incoherent.

Posted by: drindl"

Yeah, and I'm surprised more Democrats are not making hay with this. You can combine the anger at TARP with the hatred of the banking industry to really have a powerful political weapon.

Posted by: DDAWD | March 25, 2010 4:10 PM | Report abuse

Troubled Ass Relection Program

Posted by: newbeeboy | March 25, 2010 4:09 PM | Report abuse

Both parties are knee deep in the TARP Pit.

Posted by: newbeeboy | March 25, 2010 4:08 PM | Report abuse

Nobody liked what needed to be done, I thought it stank too. But I still beleive it was necessary.

But what I can't beleive, what is *really* surreal, is that a lot of these Rs running against tarp are also against regulation of the financial industry, to keep a meltdown from happening again. It's so insanely incoherent.

Posted by: drindl | March 25, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

I believe part of Bill Halter's campaign for his primary challenge to Blanche Lincoln is on TARP as well, so it's not just Republicans.

Not that I'm against Republicans losing in primaries, but I'm hoping that they are able to explain why they thought it was necessary. I just absolutely hate when people say this is about "rewarding" the bankers.

Posted by: DDAWD | March 25, 2010 3:45 PM | Report abuse

Pardon me if I am not showing adequate sympathy for those whom are hoist on their own petard.

Sometimes government has to step in. When you don't regulate effectively, and entities grow so large that letting them collapse will take out all of us as collateral damage, you need to wake up to the fact that you're going to have to either regulate more effectively or continue bailing out companies that get too big. The Repubs who voted for TARP cast the right vote. The mistake was in later disparaging TARP, stimulus bills and all forms of government intervention. Pick your metaphor; petard hoisting, lying in the beds they've made, etc. Karma can be a bytch.

Posted by: bsimon1 | March 25, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

Dan Coats WAS TARP, personified it.

The Tarpster, he did more to TARP the country than anyone else.

But this is the sickness of the Republican party, that they are running against what probably saved this country from going under.

Sick, sick, sick.

Posted by: drindl
------------------------------------------
"probably saved this country" Proof???

Posted by: leapin | March 25, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

Ok, time to get serious,
last post for today...

The stock market is going bananas.
Everyone is piling money on, trying to get in on the betting, even at this level.

People have been warning about corrections, even irrational exuberance. Well what about the shadow housing problem, jobs coming back?

The people who bet their lives don't share your concern. The world is betting heavily again on America's economic future...

...even as Republicans are pretending it is not happening.

Can this be real? Seriously, are Republicans capable of realizing that the elections are pretty far off?

If Republicans can not find some way
to destroy confidence in this recovery,
they will just have to forget about the
Republican Rising!

Posted by: shrink2 | March 25, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

As a die-hard Demo, I hope these rabid conservative challengers win the GOP primary, not because I think it will be easier for Demos to win in places like Arizona and Utah, rather it will eliminate some Senators who pretend to be moderates. As Sen. Snowe proved in the health care debate, there is no such thing as a "Moderate Republican" anymore. It will confirm what everone knows: the GOP is now the party of the extreme right.

Posted by: bgjd1979 | March 25, 2010 3:42 PM | Report abuse

Luckily, this thread is about INCUMBENTS who actually voted for TARP (as I pointed out, below, Coats was not an incumbent ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 25, 2010 3:40 PM | Report abuse

Dan Coats WAS TARP, personified it.

The Tarpster, he did more to TARP the country than anyone else.

But this is the sickness of the Republican party, that they are running against what probably saved this country from going under.

Sick, sick, sick.

Posted by: drindl | March 25, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

Hunh? I thought those advocacy groups were all about suffling as much tax payer money over to corporations as possible? Did Wall Street donate too much to the other side for their liking?

Posted by: EricS2 | March 25, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

This is bizarre.

"McCain, while not walking entirely away from the vote, has said that he was "misled" into believing that the vast majority of the money would go to rescue the housing market not the banking industry."

Ahm, this was not a long time ago. We were all here and watching, intently.

Can you McCain voters at least acknowledge that he is (a) Lying! (b) suffering from Dementia (c) we are lucky he is not the President, or (d) yeah, you know. All of the above.

Even Republicans know their party is lucky McCain/Palin didn't win. Plausible deniability is money.


Posted by: shrink2 | March 25, 2010 3:20 PM | Report abuse

A bit late for McCain to claim he was duped. As if a Republican needs his arm twisted to hand over billions in taxpayer money to people who already have more money than anyone.

In his "no cooperation for the rest of the year" tantrum, McCain has proven himself to be an adolescent in a septugenarian's skin. Don't know what the rest of you ever saw in this petulant loser.

Posted by: Noacoler | March 25, 2010 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Good thing Dan Coats didn't have to vote for TARP ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 25, 2010 3:19 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company