Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Tea party test run in Nashville

1. All eyes -- not focused on the coming snowpocalypse in Washington -- will be looking toward Nashville this weekend where the first ever national gathering of the tea party movement is taking place. The marquee event will be Saturday night when former Alaska governor Sarah Palin delivers the keynote address at the gathering but, more broadly, this weekend should tell us something about whether the tea partiers are a passing political fad or have staying power within the political arena. Already several planned speakers -- Reps. Michelle Bachmann of Minnesota and Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee -- have withdrawn from the convention because of the high prices being charged attendees. And, in the first test of the tea parties' strength in a campaign, the the Illinois gubernatorial and Senate primary contests, the movement's candidates came up well short. Those developments aside, the planned schedule for the weekend is packed with events aimed at trying to codify just what unites the attendees of the conference. "If you take 1,000 so-called tea partiers and ask them what this movement is, you'll get 1,000 different interpretations," Mark Williams, a talk-radio host and chairman of the Tea Party Express told the Post's Phil Rucker. "But they're all waving American flags and speaking out against the galloping socialist agenda." The search for what's next in the tea party movement will play out in the national spotlight as media converge on Nashville to get a glimpse at the next big movement in politics (and, of course, Sarah Palin too). Passion in politics is in short supply and it's clear from their town halls protests last summer that the members of the tea party movement are mad as hell. But, is there something beyond that anger that they can rally around heading into the 2010 midterms and, eventually, the 2012 presidential race? This weekend begins an attempt -- by the members of the movement as well as interested observers in the media -- to answer that question. ALSO READ: CNN's poll on the tea party movement showing that 40 percent of people don't know enough about it to offer an opinion.

2. Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R) isn't the best known name in the 2012 presidential field but, as of right now, he appears to be the hardest working. Since deciding not to seek a third term as governor in June 2009 (a tacit admission of his plan to run for president), Pawlenty has been everywhere -- raising more than $1.3 million for his Freedom First PAC and traveling the country to help collect cash for aspiring candidates and state parties. Tonight Pawlenty will be in Alabama to raise money for the state party. After delivering his final state of the state address on Feb. 11, Pawlenty will embark on a series of trips -- spending four days in Washington to attend the CPAC and National Governors Association meeting, then in back to back days starting on Feb. 26 Pawlenty will speak at the Missouri then the Nevada state party Lincoln day dinners. (Of his decision to travel to Nevada, Pawlenty said on his Facebook page: "The goal is to replace Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid with a Senator who values the needs of Nevadans more than the partisan interests of his political party.") To most Republicans, Pawlenty remains an unknown as evidenced by the fact that he barely breaks one or two percent in most polls conducted in the race. But, he is clearly committed to doing the legwork to put himself in position to make a serious run at the nomination in a few years time.

3. Flexing her financial might, former eBay CEO Meg Whitman (R) launches the first ad of her campaign for governor in California today -- a 60-second commercial that frames her as the sort of change agent who can turn things around in the state. Speaking to the camera, Whitman says that the number one problem facing California is a "crisis of confidence" that the state can be saved and adds that things are the worst she has seen in her 30 years living in the state -- a pronouncement that created some controversy since, well, Whitman hasn't lived in the state for three decades. Cementing her outsider credentials, Whitman castigates the "professional politicians [who] have been fighting in Sacramento for years" and touts her own experience running eBay to argue she bring a fresh perspective.The ad, which was produced by Scott Howell, will run on statewide broadcast and cable stations -- a multimillion dollar outlay of cash that demonstrates Whitman's willingness to use her own money to fund a contest that, if she winds up as the GOP nominee, could cost upwards of $100 million. (Whitman has already sunk nearly $40 million of her own money into the race.) Jarrod Agen, a spokesman for state Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner's gubernatorial candidacy, noted "an anti-Republican trend in Meg Whitman's campaign as she refuses to use the word 'conservative' in the ad." Perhaps. But, polling suggests Whitman has a comfortable lead over Poizner in the June 8 primary and she may already be positioning herself for the general election in this Democratic leaning state.

4. The Cook Political Report -- one of the leading political handicappers in the country (and the Fix's former employer) -- is out with its latest predictions about which party will gain and lose seats this fall. The most eye-widening estimate is in the House where the Cook House editor David Wasserman says Republicans are poised to gain between 25 and 35 seats but adds: "Every day seems to bring a new 'game-changing' pro-GOP development in a House race, and at this rate Democrats need to 'bend the political curve' to keep their majority beyond 2010. On the Senate side, Cook editor Jennifer Duffy is calling for a four to six seat Republican gain -- well short of the 10 seats the party needs to take back control of the chamber. (Cook himself is slightly more bullish on Republican prospects in the Senate, predicting gains of between five and seven seats.) At the gubernatorial level too, the editors at Cook see gains for the GOP -- three to five seats -- although the number of difficult open seats Republicans must defend (Rhode Island, Hawaii, California and Connecticut to name a few) make more widespread gains difficult. ALSO READ: Stu Rothenberg's latest House, Senate and governors ratings.

5. Doug Heye, a veteran GOP operative, is taking over as communications director at the Republican National Committee -- a position that had sat vacant for months following Trevor Francis departure in late November. (Francis has since signed on with Fleishman-Hilliard, a public relations firm.) Of his new gig, Heye said: "We've got a strong team that can create real opportunities for November." Heye's biggest strength in the job may well be his relationship with RNC Chairman Michael Steele whose series of verbal missteps have badly damaged his image with the Washington chattering class. Heye served as communications director for Steele's unsuccessful run for Senate in Maryland in 2006 and, prior to that, held the same role for Sen. Richard Burr's (N.C.) successful race in 2004. Heye's hiring comes after a series of departures in the RNC communications shop. Francis and his deputy Todd Irons left last year while spokeswoman Gail Gitcho is leaving the committee to serve as communications director for Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.). She starts that job Monday.

By Chris Cillizza  |  February 5, 2010; 5:29 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Charlie Baker: Scott Brown, part deux?
Next: Primary season is underway!

Comments

Chris is a reporter, not your babysitter.

==

he's neither

he's a steno for the RNC

and you have the mind of a child

Posted by: Noacoler | February 6, 2010 3:48 AM | Report abuse

Obama's own budget director said that Obama's budget is unsustainable.


WHY doesn't Obama put up a sustainable budget?


Why is Obama SO IRRESPONSIBLE ???


It seems Obama wanted everyone to forget about the budget situation, until he jammed through his health care plan - so the whole budget would be a complete disaster.


THIS IS WHAT YOU GET WHEN YOU ELECT SOMEONE WITH NO ECONOMIC OR BUSINESS EXPERIENCE EXCEPT FOR BUYING COCAINE.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 6, 2010 3:11 AM | Report abuse

Noacoler


Chris is a reporter, not your babysitter.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 6, 2010 3:03 AM | Report abuse

You know I'm in full agreement, BB.  That Cillizza allows this to go on at the same time he does that weekly whining post about me being the big problem is an insult to our intelligence.  Jake's thick-witted idiocy was bad enough as it was but 37th is clearly working to bring discussion to a halt and since he has no job and nothing else to do it's working.  Most of the people who once put thought and effort into posts have given up, moved on, tired of trying to be heard over the idiot noise SEAT SCOTT BROWN.  One after another poster throws up his hands in disgust, naming the trolls as the reason, and CC never even mentions them as problems.

I'm completely disgusted with Cillizza.  When Jake insulted my father's memory on here and Cillizza just let it stand, even though I told him about it, I kinda snapped.  OK, JakeD is garbage, we know that, but Cillizza is supposed to be a reporter and he's less of one every week.  I'm disgusted with him for the kind of crap he writes now .. Democrats need to pay attention to Glenn Beck, the teabaggers have legitimate concerns, the GOP is a legitimate party .. I could vomit.
CC alluded to some magic banning bullet on the way .. I sincerely doubt there is anything to that, but if there is, do you think he'll do anything about the real problems in these comments?  I don't.  He'll spare the racists as always.

Take care, BB, please write me sometime, my original moniker at com cast dot net, or this one at hot mail dot com.

Posted by: Noacoler | February 6, 2010 1:03 AM | Report abuse

@Chris Fox - I'll keep reading the Fix, but am going to stay away from comments for awhile. More than anything else, blog spam is a problem. It was a problem in late summer with Jake D and has gotten worse with 37th. Saying the same thing AGAIN and AGAIN and AGAIN isn't adding to the conversation. It's spam in the classic sense of the Monty Python skit. Zouk continues posting with handles that are insults to other contributors. Don't expect me to take anyone's protestations about being banned when drivl and moonbat are used as handles.

A final straw for me was CC's own comment about this discussion being worthless. Despite the efforts of its best participants (Mark_in_Austin, ceflyonline), the Post has decided to allot virtually zero resources to its discussion forums. There are plenty of sandboxes on the internet that aren't litter boxes.

Buh-Bye

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | February 5, 2010 11:53 PM | Report abuse

Good points, 37th.

Posted by: JakeD2 | February 5, 2010 9:22 PM | Report abuse

The democratic options on health care - the analysis is based on the idea that "the damage is already done." And the damage has been massive to the democratic party.


The whole image of Obama as the bipartisan uniter - who was not only going to unite Washington, but the whole world - and had the power to unite warring Marian spacemen - has been completely destroyed - by Obama himself.


OUCH.


The response of Obama and the democrats - get mean to the Republicans, and try to call them out - is only going to make the situation worse.


First it proves that Obama really does not understand what got him into the position he is in today - which people interprete that Obama has ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA ABOUT HOW TO GOVERN.


First impressions matter - and if one takes out the die-hard democrats, Obama's numbers are really, really low.


People have tuned in to Obama over the past few weeks to hear his response - and it has not been "I made a mistake, I will listen to the American people, I will now be bipartisan."


Instead, Obama is punching at the Republicans - which is only CONFIRMING TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE what is WRONG WITH OBAMA.


And this whole idea that "charges of racism will give us some momentum" - is another attitude problem which does nothing to really help Obama at this point.


When Obama gets voted out of office, are we going to have another Nixon moment, when he calls the nation "a bunch of racists" - it is certainly possible.


Obama and the democrats are now the PARTY OF BLAME.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 8:54 PM | Report abuse

Shut up and go away you damned idiot.


.

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 7:03 PM | Report abuse

Obama's own budget director said that Obama's budget is unsustainable.

WHY doesn't Obama put up a sustainable budget?


Why is Obama SO IRRESPONSIBLE ???

It seems Obama wanted everyone to forget about the budget situation, until he jammed through his health care plan - so the whole budget would be a complete disaster.

THIS IS WHAT YOU GET WHEN YOU ELECT SOMEONE WITH NO ECONOMIC OR BUSINESS EXPERIENCE EXCEPT FOR BUYING COCAINE.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 6:54 PM | Report abuse

You never should have dropped out from those "decelerated" classes, 37th

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 5:58 PM | Report abuse

Noacoler


Another "ad hominem" attack - you should be banned again.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 5:44 PM | Report abuse

Hey broadwayjoe, I really wouldn’t bother responding to that mentally retarded a§§-nozzle.  Cillizza isn’t going to do anything about his carpet-posting (yeah his “best efforts”) and there is no agency on earth that can restore what nature took away from his brain, so let’s just let 37th post his thick-witted stump-fingered idiot drivel unremarked.  We all know he’s a complete frickin’ retard and we all know his turnaround tact is the only dab on his palette.

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

If the lesson from the last month has been that Obama HAS to be more bipartisan - in fact he NOW has to negotiate with the Republicans to get anything through the Senate, his statements are NOT helping him.

If Obama truly believes that he should get tougher with the Republicans, blame them more, and complain about programs passed 8 years ago, it is not going to work.

Is this REALLY Obama's approach to bipartisanship? It is really really hard to see that Obama thinks that this is going to work.

Obama HAS LOST SIGHT OF WHAT HE WAS ELECTED TO DO.

Obama is in Washington to serve the American People - and do what the American People want.

Obama is not there to put in his liberal agenda at all costs - an agenda which really was not explained to the American People during the campaign.

Instead, Obama is continuing with his "we didn't come to Washington to do ...." statements.

He has this hidden agenda, he keeps saying it over and over.


Obama doesn't want the economy to come in the way of his hidden agenda.


Or terrorism.


However, that is Obama's job - to take care of the economy and to keep the nation safe.

Obama keeps on making these speeches indicating he doesn't want to do those two things - that he has a hidden agenda which is far more important.

It actually may be too late for Obama - the country has been fortunate to have a special election which was able to block Obama, and the the midterms may bring the Republicans new gains.

God is watching over America.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 4:53 PM | Report abuse

"less people"

damned illiterate

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 4:49 PM | Report abuse

Sorry we had to strip off the cover issues (tax reform, anti-government, etc.) and expose the baggers for what they are (see, e.g., Janeane Garofalo's analysis).

Posted by: broadwayjoe |
------------------------------------------
There are even less people watching MSLSD than you ascribe to attending "tea parties".
We know there are 3 - Keith, Jeannie, and you.

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Thanks to CC's "best effort" we get this stumpy retarded drool from 37th all day long, the same idiot posting repeated dozens of times like a TV commercial or something.

Thanks, CC. Great moderation here.

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 4:32 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe

If you are so desperate to find a racist, why don't you look in the mirror.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 4:24 PM | Report abuse

First Impressions of Obama's governing in the first year have been a complete disaster.

AND the last seven weeks have been HORRIBLE for Obama.


Obama's soft on terrorism policy has been exposed.


Obama's health care plan has been stopped.

Obama's stimulus plan has been exposed as having little effect on the economy.

Is there anything else that is more of a disaster?


YES - it is Obama's response to these developments.

Obama is blaming the Republicans - which is NOT bipartisan - and actually is counter-productive if Obama really want to get some bipartisanship going.

Obama is looking around everywhere for someone to blame - except in the mirror.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

37, I shortened your 4:12 p.m. post for our readers. Just took out the irrelevant and unhinged stuff for you.
________

"Chris and broadwayjoe :


The question has been raised here about the UNEXPLAINED ANGER IN THIS COUNTRY.

welll.

[Irrelevant and unhinged material omitted.]

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 4:12 PM"

________

Awhile ago, malis explained the "unexplained" anger to you:

"Update: A Study on Motivation and Societal Impact of the Extremist-Obsessive Blog Poster
Subject: “37th” (shortname for subject using approximately 20 different variations of a userID containing the root phrase “37thandO”)

Subject’s postings (through Jan 2, 4:56pET) to the string “Best House Campaigns of 2008” were previously collected and classified in four defined categories. This entry appends subject’s additional posting.

As of Jan 3 10:17aET, 37th owned 14 (+3) of 64 (+6) total entries, raising the subject’s percentage of total postings to this string from 19% to 22%.

Number and percentage of on-topic postings: 0 and 0%

1) Simplistic insult of individuals and groups: 22 (+2)
2) Paranoiac accusations: 6 (+1)
3) Rote repetition of fantasy scenarios 19 (+4)
4) Projection (accusing others of behavior exhibited by the subject) 9 (+2)

Subject has initiated posting to two additional strings. Data currently being collected and analyzed. When sufficient data has been collected results will be posted to those strings.

Posted by: malis | January 3, 2009 2:30 PM"

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

The Bush administration and the Republican party got Mr. Obama elected. They knew the damage they did in the last eight years could not be repaired without great pain to Americans. They intentionally threw the election by running McCain. They new he could never win. This TEA Party Movement is about freedoms for all Americans willing to support themselves regardless of racial, religous, or ethnic background. Only those whose personal agenda will benefit from its demise and the demise of our freedoms will speak out against the TEA Party/Constitutional movement in our country.

Posted by: aarroozz | February 5, 2010 4:18 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe


You are NOT exposing the vast majority of the people in the tea party movement.


It is time for you to hang up your reasoning, because it is so flawed.

I tell you what - one sign is nothing like bringing your CHILDREN TO A RACIST CHURCH FOR YEARS.


AND GIVING $20,000 TO THAT RACIST CHURCH.

So, as you have been told repeatedly, you have no standing, you are supporting a proven RACIST - one who REFUSED to disavow Rev Wright FOR WEEKS.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 4:15 PM | Report abuse

Chris and broadwayjoe :


The question has been raised here about the UNEXPLAINED ANGER IN THIS COUNTRY.


welll.

There is a general sense in this country that our country has benn hijacked.


A presidential election is supposed to be about choosing the best person to run the country - and to choose the set of ideas that will govern the country.

I believe there has been a FUNDAMENTAL DECEPTION -

A presidential campaign is not supposed to be about making "a racial statement" - and that is what the 2008 election became - "make a racial statement."

The problem is that the other issues were swept aside - electing a person with the proper experience, the economic issues the country faces, and the national security issues the country faces.

Take the single issue of "bipartisanship" - that represented to much of America a commitment which Obama made to persue CENTRIST POLICIES AND TO COMPROMISE WITH THE REPUBLICANS.

Somehow or another, Obama decided to THROW AWAY HIS OWN WORDS.


Somehow Obama convinced himself that the election was an endorsement of a far-left agenda.


That was simply not the case.

There is a FUNDAMENTAL SENSE in the country - and it is just not the tea party people - that Obama has NOT been going after policies which he committed himself to.

That is a deception.

THEN there also appears to be a "strategy" out there - that Obama's people will manufacture some racial incident everytime Obama gets into trouble - this happened last summer when Carter came out and started to say racism was behind the anger.

First impressions are important - and Obama had a first impression at governing - and this country is DEEPLY DISAPPOINTED - that Obama has abandoned what he promised during the campaign - that the campaign was one giant DECEPTION.


The People of Massachusetts are not a cross-section of the country - not by far.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 4:12 PM | Report abuse

Nice try, 37.

Dale Robertson is identified as the president and founder of the Tea Party on..."www.teaparty.org."
Sorry we had to strip off the cover issues (tax reform, anti-government, etc.) and expose the baggers for what they are (see, e.g., Janeane Garofalo's analysis).

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 4:03 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe


Also, while you accuse one set of people of using slurs - YOU use a highly objectionable sexual term for a group of people who are expressing their views.


You should stop using this sexual term right away.

AND go to sensitivity training with Rahm.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 3:58 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe


You make it seem like EVERY PERSON at the Tea parties were carrying objectionable signs. That is not the case.

You are looking for racists everywhere, behind every legitimate political opinion. You are basically attempting your own version of McCarthyism.

IF YOU READ YOUR OWN LINK, the article CLEARLY says that the person with the sign you didn't like WAS ASKED TO LEAVE.

So, he really wasn't a "leader" as you say, because some other "leader" higher than him got him to leave.

Now, I could quote C-List actresses - however what kind of weight does that hold?

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 3:44 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe


You make it seem like EVERY PERSON at the Tea parties were carrying objectionable signs. That is not the case.

You are looking for racists everywhere, behind every legitimate political opinion. You are basically attempting your own version of McCarthyism.

IF YOU READ YOUR OWN LINK, the article CLEARLY says that the person with the sign you didn't like WAS ASKED TO LEAVE.

So, he really wasn't a "leader" as you say, because some other "leader" higher than him got him to leave.

Now, I could quote C-List actresses - however what kind of weight does that hold?

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 3:44 PM | Report abuse

Tax reform? Yeah, right...

"The Tea Party convention kicked off last night with an explosive speech from former Republican Rep. Tom Tancredo, who lambasted "the cult of multiculturalism" in the U.S.

Tancredo, at right, also called President Obama a "socialist ideologue," who was elected because "we do not have a civics, literacy test before people can vote in this country," according to ABC News.

"People who could not spell the word vote or say it in English put a committed socialist ideologue in the White House - name is Barack Hussein Obama," he said, Fox News reports.

Tancredo, who ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 2008 mainly on a platform opposing illegal immigration, also bashed Sen. John McCain in his remarks. "
_________

BTW, multiculturalism is a code word in the organized hate community.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Chris:

Some posters today are referring to your comments on this blog - yes, this blog has some problems. I have to say it is very difficult to stick to posts of substance when so much attacking is going on here in the blog.

Several on this blog appear as if their primary motive is to attack other posters - with their ultimate goal of getting rid of opposing opinions.

I believe that is an important distinction - do these posters want to get rid of the opposing opinions or are they tolerant ??

I believe some of these individuals worked directly for the Obama campaign last year - and now they may work for the DNC or the White House directly - and it is not a pretty picture.

Much of this intolerant behavior started on the Daily Kos in the primaries against Hillary - that blog descended into nastiness and people were asked to leave.

There has to be a level of civil discourse between the posters - which is completely absent here.

And on the other hand, one can not expect one set of posters to be subjected to relentless attacks, and not respond.

I will continue to state my opinion - and apparently if that gets people upset, so be it. However, that is all about their intolerance.

The other thing - Chris - you made a big point about "ad hominem" attacks about a month ago - I keep on posting what I believed with the "ad hominem" attacks but nothing was done.


For a while, it appeared that the identification of the "ad hominem" attacks quieted the board for a while, but lately things have been worse.

There are a few posters on here who have been on the verge of calling 1.1 Million People in Massachusetts a bunch of racists for voting for Scott Brown - they are desperate to identify racist behind every legitimate political view.


Hence, they are angry and bothered when they find that it is not reasonable to do so.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 3:36 PM | Report abuse

37, various award winning political journalists amd commentators have called out the Tea Bag Party as a racist proxy agenda. Very, very few in the MSM dignify "the Party" with the characterization of "political movement."

The Brotherhood is not a movement. Nor is the Aryan Nation. Let's get real: 600 people led by a guy who publicly carries an n-word sign is not a movement, IMO.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 3:25 PM | Report abuse

"Scores of tea party activists from as far as Hawaii arrived in Nashville on Thursday, energized by signs that their cries last year had been heard and that that political tide is turning against Obama and congressional Democrats"

'Scores: a group or set of 20: about a score of years ago."

Why not tell the truth, WaPo and say 'dozens'. that's what a flop this was.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 3:22 PM | Report abuse

"The inaugural National Tea Party Convention began yesterday in Nashville, TN despite teabagger infighting and controversy surrounding the event in recent weeks. Tea Party activists have criticized the “scammy” convention’s cost, organizer Judson Phillips’ intention to make money of the event, and Sarah Palin’s $120,000 speaking fee. And today, the Washington Post reports that the teabaggers — who often boast of their patriotic bona fides — got off to a slow start:

And outside the convention hall, entrepreneurs sold souvenirs: sterling silver tea bag necklaces ($89.99), bags of “Freedom Coffee” ($9) and T-shirts emblazoned with a bald eagle ($20).

The convention’s first day lacked the orchestrated staging of most modern political events. The convention host delivered a meandering welcome speech without notes, saying he misplaced them. Former congressman Tom Tancredo (R-Colo.) offered a fiery defense of Judeo-Christian faith and traditional American values, but there was no prayer or Pledge of Allegiance to open the convention — nor was there an American flag in the convention hall. "

Maybe they're going for another symbol. Confederate flag, maybe? Swastika?

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 3:19 PM | Report abuse

drindl, the same mind-set describes landing Coats for the Indiana Senate race as "a major coup." That was a foolish way to frame Coats' candidacy and I'm sure it was pretty much a cut and paste from the RNC's news blast.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | February 5, 2010 12:21 PM
________

That's too harsh, MM. At least the transcription of the RNC press advisory was accurate.
Posted by: broadwayjoe |

pretty much. but since *everything* is a 'coup' for repugs, you'll have to get used to it.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 3:17 PM | Report abuse

Obama and the democrats have become the Party of Blame.


All they do is blame someone.


When it got tiring to blame Bush, now they are moving on to Blame the Republicans in Congress.


To hear the democrats now, you would think they are out of power.


When will the democrats stop being babies, and start taking responsiblity???


Listen to Obama now, all he does is complain about things in his budget -


OBAMA WAS COMPLAINING ABOUT THINGS IN HIS OWN BUDGET.


If he doesn't like his budget, change it -- don't blame it on anyone else - IT IS HIS BUDGET.


LET ME MAKE IT CLEAR - Nancy Pelosi and the House has been passing the budget since 2007 - those are HER NUMBERS.


Listen to Obama's speeches - he starts off with a lecture on ancient history - and over here, we have budgetary items passed when the dinosaur movies were still around.....


And over here, we have the prescription drug program - NOT my program - some other health care program that BLEW A MASSIVE HOLE IN THE BUDGET.


If Obama is complaining about the cost of Bush's prescription drug program, WHAT WOULD THE COST OF OBAMA'S HEALTH CARE PROGRAM BE IN 8 YEARS ???


It is simply incredible listening to Obama - his isn't responsible for anything - it is all someone else's fault.


Obama and the democrats are the Party of Blame.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 3:12 PM | Report abuse

The TP movement us nothing if not racist. Ever heard anyone at one of their rallies say a word about taxes? No.

Heard any of them sling names at Obama? All of them.

The guy with the sign us just being a little more direct than most.

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 3:12 PM | Report abuse

broadwayjoe


Your comments today clearly show that all you want to do is practice the politics of hate - you want to find every opportunity to call someone a racist - and to find racists where there are none.

This kind of politics is poison - you are not seeking compromise, or even trying to work with the other side.

I have to condemn your remarks today - they are hate-filled - and very much far from the truth.

Besides, you seem to base a great deal of your thoughts on one sign - you post a link - but the link says that the person with that sign was asked to LEAVE.

So you are constantly attempting to characterized an entire movement with one sign - and all along you have had a link which clearly said that person was asked to LEAVE - WHICH MEANS THAT PERSON AND THAT SIGN ARE NOT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE MOVEMENT.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | February 5, 2010 3:02 PM | Report abuse

drindl, the same mind-set describes landing Coats for the Indiana Senate race as "a major coup." That was a foolish way to frame Coats' candidacy and I'm sure it was pretty much a cut and paste from the RNC's news blast.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | February 5, 2010 12:21 PM
________

That's too harsh, MM. At least the transcription of the RNC press advisory was accurate.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 2:57 PM | Report abuse

"you people" refers to dumb fundamentalist crackers who believe global warming is fake and marketplaces make decisions.

Posted by: Noacoler
-------------------------------------------
Who is dumb? Global warming is falling apart. (See Penn State and Climategate). The statists, universities, and private green companies all make out financially on the tax payer's dime. Accept BHO's statist agenda and receive a grant or a subsidy! The marketplace has made the decision to not create jobs because the marketkeepers don't know from day to day what the NeoCom statists will be confiscating from them. As a result of all this tax-talking frenzy, business owners have no idea what their new aggregate tax obligations will be or when they will kick in. They can only sense that the Obama administration wants to go after successful entrepreneurs to fund more federal entitlement for others — as if the 5 percent of Americans who fork over 55 percent of the aggregate income tax revenue don't pay enough already.

If President Obama really wants to foster job growth, he needs to get specific. Stop the borrowing and instead tell the business community exactly what income, payroll and surcharge taxes he proposes, when they will begin — and how much he appreciates those who will pay them.

When it comes to creating a psychological climate to encourage employers to start hiring again, a little certainty and a little praise are lot better than uncertainty and talk of taxing even more those who now already pay the most.

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 2:49 PM | Report abuse

Good-bye for awhile. I read CC's answer in today's chat and it sounded about right:

"And, is there any comments section in a political blog that is worth reading? Despite my best efforts, the Fix comments section usually devolves into 5 or so people throwing mud at one another while ignoring the actual topic of the post on which they are 'commenting'."

==

"despite my best efforts"

what efforts would those be, Chris? After Jake does over a thousand birther posts? Zouk calling others pedophiles? Letting 37 and others carpet-bomb the blog with repeated idiot posts?

You haven't done squat. YOU LIE!!!

Later, BB

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

"you people" is that suppose to be a thinly vailed racial reference? I did see a dinosaur skelton at the museum last week.

==

you're not a member of a racial minority, you're a bone-white cracker living in a single-wide in BFE.

"you people" refers to dumb fundamentalist crackers who believe global warming is fake and marketplaces make decisions.

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 2:32 PM | Report abuse

Good-bye for awhile. I read CC's answer in today's chat and it sounded about right:

"And, is there any comments section in a political blog that is worth reading? Despite my best efforts, the Fix comments section usually devolves into 5 or so people throwing mud at one another while ignoring the actual topic of the post on which they are 'commenting'."

My only addition would be that this is what happens when there is no moderation. I'd also note that any conversation, which is what a comments section should be at its best, will wander. I'll take CC at his word, though.

Buh-bye

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | February 5, 2010 2:29 PM | Report abuse

This election the stakes are not just the particular career of yet another politician, but the very way our United States will fare for a generation. Rarely has the Left so ambitiously and brazenly set out a statist agenda, to radically transform America by establishing such gargantuan deficits that a variety of tax increases to prevent bankruptcy will mean that the nation’s entrepreneurial class will pay between 60 and 65% of their incomes in taxes —“spreading the wealth” in pursuit of “redistributive change.” Since the economy experienced GDP growth over 5% in the last quarter, these record deficits are more than stimulus. They are unabashedly ideological in nature. My only puzzlement is whether Obama is primarily interested in the growing of government per se, so that new millions of loyal constituents can either administer or receive entitlements — or his primary interest is in piling up red-ink to such a degree that record new state income, federal income, payroll, capital gains, and property taxes will radically redistribute income: the entrepreneur will accept that he can keep scarcely 40% of his gross income, and can’t pass on his life’s work without 45-55% in inheritance taxes to a government to redistribute to more “deserving” others, and in despair accept his fate that he is just a cog in the wheel like everyone else. (E.g., So why do the extra work, when the government will take it while alive and after death?)

With such stakes, it is a great time to be alive in the arena. And each according to his station should be excited that he can, must rise to the occasion to ward off this latest challenge to the old notion of a republic of free and independent citizens — who aren’t quite yet willing to surrender what the great generations of the past suffered so much to pass on to us.

Party On!!!

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 2:25 PM | Report abuse

Deer Felow Small Toun Americcans,
 
I look foreword to speeking my traidmark mindless babel at yore convenshun in Nashvil in my little gurl voise.
 
Love,
xoxox  Sarah
 
PS send money

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Deer Felow Small Toun Americcans,
 
I look foreword to speeking my traidmark mindless babel at yore convenshun in Nashvil in my little gurl voise.
 
Love,
xoxox  Sarah
 
PS send money

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Don't you people not believe in dinosaurs or that the earth is older than a few thousand years?

Posted by: DDAWD
-----------------------------------------
"you people" is that suppose to be a thinly vailed racial reference? I did see a dinosaur skelton at the museum last week.

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 2:08 PM | Report abuse

"In terms of time, 1.9 trillion seconds adds up to about 60,000 years. And 1.9 trillion hours ago, or almost 220 million years ago, dinosaurs were just beginning to dominate the Earth.


Posted by: leapin"

Don't you people not believe in dinosaurs or that the earth is older than a few thousand years?

Posted by: DDAWD | February 5, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

Do most people have amnesia when it comes to political party's, national security and the budget?

Republican President G. W. Bush was in office on 9/11 and allowed the US homeland to be attacked by a group of Muslim extremist. Weeks prior to the attack he and Cheney received a security briefing outlining the threat of an immediate attack. Bush went on vacation and Cheney disappeared. Wow, Republicans on great on National Security.

President Ronald Reagan holds the budget increase record and voted for more tax increase than any other Republican . After 8 years of Reagan the national debt increased more than 189%.

For you tea baggers let me explain 189 to you, that is the average IQ of 100 tea baggers at the Nashville convention.

ZER0-the number of bills the GOP supported, or voted on since the 2009 inaugration. Would not even vote to reign in the banks. ZERO-the total numer of ideas or suggestions made by the GOP.

Anyway gotta go, that amnesia is returning.

Posted by: COWENS99 | February 5, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

And while zouk/drivl may 'like' women his chance of ever getting one is zero. how could he date when he never leaves this board? and what woman could possibly what an unemployed zero liike him?

Posted by: drindl
------------------------------------------
A government dependent or employee.

I didn't know you are a women. Are you that ultra-lib Jeanie person who illogically thinks if people disagree with BHO and the statist agenda that you are a racist?

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 2:00 PM | Report abuse

Here CC -- is the real story of the day -- how could you miss it?

'There has been a lot of discussion of how foreign companies will be able to influence elections and politics given the Citizens United deal. But foreign companies are already dominating our politics.

Consider Richard Shelby’s decision to place holds on all of Obama’s nominees unless some federal money that may benefit Alabama gets released.

Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) has put an extraordinary “blanket hold” on at least 70 nominations President Obama has sent to the Senate, according to multiple reports this evening. The hold means no nominations can move forward unless Senate Democrats can secure a 60-member cloture vote to break it, or until Shelby lifts the hold.

Essentially, Shelby’s threat is primarily about gaming this bidding process to make sure Airbus–and not Boeing–wins the contract.

Underlying the refueling contract is the question of whether the US military ought to spend what may amount to $100 billion over the life of the contract with a foreign company, Airbus. Particularly a company that the WTO found preliminarily to be illegally benefiting from subsidies from European governments.

Richard Shelby is preparing to shut down the Senate to try to force the government to award a key military function to a foreign company."

So much for American jobs, eh? And there's that thing about earmarks...

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 1:55 PM | Report abuse

"I believe he likes attractive women not a self described "poor fat, lonely boy in his basement".
Posted by: leapin"

I am a woman, idiotboy. And while zouk/drivl may 'like' women his chance of ever getting one is zero. how could he date when he never leaves this board? and what woman could possibly what an unemployed zero liike him?

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

Nothing to say?

It is clear you are not from this planet. If there is anything you could say about zouk, the notion of nothing to say is as far from reality as Peds wanderings from American morality.

your mind is clearly failing with all that liberal junk food you feed it.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Here CC -- is the real story of the day -- how could you miss it?

'There has been a lot of discussion of how foreign companies will be able to influence elections and politics given the Citizens United deal. But foreign companies are already dominating our politics.

Consider Richard Shelby’s decision to place holds on all of Obama’s nominees unless some federal money that may benefit Alabama gets released.

Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) has put an extraordinary “blanket hold” on at least 70 nominations President Obama has sent to the Senate, according to multiple reports this evening. The hold means no nominations can move forward unless Senate Democrats can secure a 60-member cloture vote to break it, or until Shelby lifts the hold.

Essentially, Shelby’s threat is primarily about gaming this bidding process to make sure Airbus–and not Boeing–wins the contract.

Underlying the refueling contract is the question of whether the US military ought to spend what may amount to $100 billion over the life of the contract with a foreign company, Airbus. Particularly a company that the WTO found preliminarily to be illegally benefiting from subsidies from European governments.

Richard Shelby is preparing to shut down the Senate to try to force the government to award a key military function to a foreign company."

So much for American jobs, eh?

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Poor zouk -- nothing to say, so he has to focus on his obssesion with me -- poor fat, lonely boy in his basement.

Posted by: drindl
------------------------------------------
I believe he likes attractive women not a self described "poor fat, lonely boy in his basement".

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Of course, like all liberals, the math will be too much for them.

Posted by: drivl
-----------------------------------------
True. Why else would a group clap and celebrate (insanity?) the enslavement of current and future familes by increasing debt by 1.9 trillion? How much is 1.9 trillion?

A 1.9 trillion-mile trip is about the same as 8 million trips to the moon.
Unfortunately, the $1.9 trillion in new borrowing authority Congress is giving President Barack Obama won't take people quite that far. The additional $1.9 trillion raises the debt ceiling to $14.3 trillion, but that limit may have to be increased again after the November election.
No matter how you look at it, 1.9 trillion is a lot. In dollars, it equals about $6,000 for every man, woman and child in the U.S. It's almost twice all the money America has spent on military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001.
That amount would buy about 422 Nimitz Class aircraft carriers, which run about $4.5 billion apiece. It would be enough to provide Pell grants of $5,000 to some 380 million low-income students, a number exceeding the entire population of the country.
And 1.9 trillion feet would take you to the top of Mount Everest 65 million times, or to the bottom of the 36,000-foot Mariana Trench, the deepest point in the Pacific, about 53 million times.
In terms of time, 1.9 trillion seconds adds up to about 60,000 years. And 1.9 trillion hours ago, or almost 220 million years ago, dinosaurs were just beginning to dominate the Earth.


Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 1:44 PM | Report abuse

Poor zouk -- nothing to say, so he has to focus on his obssesion with me -- poor fat, lonely boy in his basement.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 1:43 PM | Report abuse

According to The One, as long as Shelby posts his desire for pork over on that official web page, there is nothihng wrong with this approach.

Pork on!

Seems like a far cry from 'line by line 'promised by then candidate Obama. but than as ninny says, a lot of things are said on the campaign trail. It is understood by her that they are for the most part all lies. the rest of us are still figuring that out.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010/02/05/us/AP-KS-XGR-House-Speaker-Lawsuit.html?_r=1

Kansas...still flyover country

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) -- A Democratic legislator called Friday for Kansas' Republican House speaker to step down because he is representing businesses, trade groups and insurance funds in a lawsuit against the state.

State Rep. Marti Crow said Speaker Mike O'Neal has a conflict of interest on legislation affecting any of his 17 clients in the lawsuit. Both Crow and O'Neal are attorneys.

''He has created a situation where he can't lead this body,'' Crow, a Leavenworth Democrat, told The Associated Press. ''I don't know how he can carry out his duties.''

O'Neal, a Hutchinson Republican, called Crow's assertion ''ludicrous.''

Posted by: shrink2 | February 5, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

dribbl only got that one email today from Kos. hence her mind is free to concentrate on it all day, over and over.

Still not a single original thought from the moonbats. Perhaps it will coincide with berry's first success, sometime later this year or maybe next.


Just 46% of Americans approve of the job that Barack Obama is doing vs. 53% who disapprove, according to the latest Rasmussen poll. That’s almost equal to the 46%-54% disparity just before his State of the Union address. Earlier this week, Obama got as high as 50% support vs. 49% opposed.

Dead cat bounce.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 1:37 PM | Report abuse

"In case you hadn’t heard, Richard Shelby (R-AL) has shut down the government because he wants fat, greasy pork projects for Alabama — including his own personal $45 million earmark."
------------------------------------------
Not good but why should all porkulus go to Obama supporters?

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 1:36 PM | Report abuse

In case you hadn’t heard, Richard Shelby (R-AL) has shut down the government because he wants fat, greasy pork projects for Alabama — including his own personal $45 million earmark.
Odd. I thought earmarks and pork were the root of all our problems.

John McCain.

“The president needs to come out and say that he’ll veto any appropriations bill that has an earmark or pork-barrel project tacked onto it. We need to be very focused on eliminating the deficit.”

John Boehner:

“I think the president missed a golden opportunity to really fulfill his campaign commitment to not sign bills that have a lot of wasteful spending and are overburdened with earmarks,” Boehner said.

Jim DeMint:

Earmarks have created a culture of corruption in Congress that wastes billions of tax dollars on special interest projects–like pork in the stimulus bill, the “Cornhusker Kickback,” and the Wall Street bailout–and allows party leaders to bribe politicians for their votes.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 1:33 PM | Report abuse

Leapin

future liberal great thinkers (in their communication class major field of study, the required course) will study the "great" speakers of history. they will review the similarities of the great speeches. the tone, the cadence, the upturned chin.

the greatest as we all know are Hitler, Mussolini, Fidel and Obama. not only are the gestures and pauses eerily similar, so is the message.

What a great term paper for a future Keith Olbermann.

Of course, like all liberals, the math will be too much for them.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 1:31 PM | Report abuse

Tickets to see Palin are $349 and participants can attend the entire event for $549.'

Posted by: drindl
-----------------------------------------
Very reasonable prices compared to an Al Gore speech.

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 1:29 PM | Report abuse

the teabagger 'grassroots' -- hilarious:

"You're from the mountains of North Carolina? We have a second home in the mountains of North Carolina," effused Herselie DuValle Hendrix, a retired personnel manager from Crestview, Florida while standing online Thursday to register for the first National Tea Party Convention.

The genteel atmosphere of the first day of the convention - which is sharing the cavernous Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center with a Sherwin Williams Paint conference and a spa-related meet-up of ladies called "Wisdom Workshops" - was a far cry from the angry, raucous crowds usually associated with Tea Party protests. The only signs were one enormous photo of Sarah Palin toted by a fan and advertisements at a booth selling silver and precious stone tea bag pendants for $89.99.

And certainly, one must have some means to attend the convention. Located next to the Grand Ole Opry arena and miles of outlet shops, the resort features five restaurants, a spa and 47 acres of buildings and botanical gardens all encased under domed glass; there's even a river walk and a "show-boat" tour.

Basic rooms start at $149 a night for parking-lot views plus $25 a day for parking. Talk on the registration line ranged from frustration at having to postpone retirement because of the economic downturn to the care and training of horses. Attendees were white and older; there were more women than men.'

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 1:29 PM | Report abuse

Six hundred nationwide.

An unadvertised polka concert in a modest city park could get more than that.

But to GOP-fellating CC, why, it's the biggest event since Pearl Harbor.

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 1:28 PM | Report abuse

@s50: as you know, I don't buy into your agenda, BUT, importantly, you don't see me laughing at it either. I recognize you are/were a legitimate journalist. In the end, you may have the last laugh. Who knows? All the best.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 1:26 PM | Report abuse

AP - After insisting for a year that failure was not an option, President Barack Obama is now acknowledging his health care overhaul may die in Congress.

Companion story:

After insisting for a year that failure was not all he knew, President Barack Obama is now acknowledging his failures may doom the Dem Congress.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

A year later, after stunning Democratic setbacks in Virginia, New Jersey and Massachusetts, Obama gave a stay-the-course State of the Union address (a) pledging not to walk away from health care reform, (b) seeking to turn college education increasingly into a federal entitlement, and (c) asking again for cap-and-trade energy legislation. Plus, of course, another stimulus package, this time renamed a "jobs bill."
This being a democracy, don't the Democrats see that clinging to this agenda will march them over a cliff? Don't they understand Massachusetts?
Well, they understand it through a prism of two cherished axioms: (1) The people are stupid and (2) Republicans are bad. Result? The dim, led by the malicious, vote incorrectly.
Liberal expressions of disdain for the intelligence and emotional maturity of the electorate have been, post-Massachusetts, remarkably unguarded. New York Times columnist Charles Blow chided Obama for not understanding the necessity of speaking "in the plain words of plain folks," because the people are "suspicious of complexity." Counseled Blow: "The next time he gives a speech, someone should tap him on the ankle and say, 'Mr. President, we're down here.'"

Posted by: leapin | February 5, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

It seems the presence of at least two stooges has emboldened the council of idiots to post non-stop garbage for the rest of the afternoon.

Flush now to avoid the stench.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 1:21 PM | Report abuse

What's next here? Coverage of the next meeting of the Brotherhood? Aryan Nation? The White Citizens Council?
________

The only "news and analysis" the teabaggers merit is the following from political commentator Janeane Garofalo:

""Let's be very honest about what this is about. This is not about bashing Democrats. It's not about taxes. They have no idea what the Boston Tea party was about. They don't know their history at all. It's about hating a black man in the White House," she said on MSNBC's "The Countdown" with Keith Olbermann Thursday evening. "This is racism straight up and is nothing but a bunch of teabagging rednecks. There is no way around that.""

Straight up.


Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 1:20 PM | Report abuse

You couldn't be more betraying of your country if you flew an airliner into a building

Posted by: Noacoler


Ped opens and closes with the most inane blathering a contemptible morally vacant loser could compose.

Can we all now agrree to ignore this desperate souless cretin?

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 1:16 PM | Report abuse

Tancredo says Obama won because we lack a 'literacy test before people vote '

Should voting rights be subject to a literacy test?

==

Absolutely.

There is no point whatsoever in counting votes from people who don't understand what they're voting for.

Any voter should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge if civics, science, and logic.

.

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 1:15 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: scrivener50 | February 5, 2010 1:15 PM | Report abuse

Dribbl, don't you get help with peanuts you may have missed from the roadies?

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Here's the real story behind the Tea party convention -- it's a Suckerfest!

'Over the past few weeks, several sponsors, speakers and volunteers have backed out of the convention, scheduled Feb. 4-6 at Opryland Hotel in Nashville, Tenn., after learning that the convention organizer, Tea Party Nation, is a for-profit company. Some activists and outsiders alike are questioning the motives of Tea Party Nation founder Judson Phillips.

The event's main sponsor, American Liberty Alliance, dropped its sponsorship after learning that those who purchased tickets paid for them through PayPal accounts linked to an e-mail address belonging to Phillips' wife.

National Precinct Alliance has canceled precinct strategy workshops. Meanwhile, American Majority scrapped plans for two sessions at the convention and withdrew its sponsorship.

The national convention that began as a way to unify tea party activists from across the country is now threatening to divide them. Some of Tea Party Nation's own volunteers and members have rejected the convention because they see profiteering and fear a Republican Party takeover.

Saturday night's keynote speaker Sarah Palin remains committed to the event.

Palin's speaking fee is $100,000. As a down payment for Palin's fee, Phillips reportedly borrowed $50,000, much of it from a baseball card mogul. He missed his first payment.

Tickets to see Palin are $349 and participants can attend the entire event for $549.'

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

That's right, drindl, just like Hillary Clinton did with Hillarycare, etc.

Posted by: JakeD2 | February 5, 2010 1:10 PM | Report abuse

@s50: ...er, actually, I was referring to your, well, personal recovery...Take it day by day. All the best.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 1:06 PM | Report abuse

You have indeed committed the worst possible sin of a professional journalist: Instead of informing the public, you have misled them into believing that this insane band of morons who make up about 10% of the electorate is representative of the maionstream of American thinking.

I have nothing but contempt for you.

==

vehement, passionate co-sign

Cillizza, people like you carrying water for anti-American Republicans are practically traitors. You couldn't be more betraying of your country if you flew an airliner into a building

Posted by: Noacoler | February 5, 2010 1:05 PM | Report abuse

Sorry to disappoint you, Chris, but my eyes are definitely not looking towards Nashville where the Social Misfits & Assorted Cretins "convention" is taking place.

Posted by: Gatsby10 | February 5, 2010 1:04 PM | Report abuse

apparently, First Dude was actually the governor of Alaska -- what a surprise.


'A nice get from MSNBC.com: a huge batch of internal e-mails released in response to an Alaska open records request show that Todd Palin played a big role in his wife's administration, often corresponding directly with the governor's staff on matters ranging from appointments to contract negotiations.

Todd Palin was known as the "shadow governor" and was a key figure in the Troopergate scandal that dogged Sarah Palin during the 2008 campaign. In recent months, there's evidence that he is still his wife's most important protector: he personally drew up the now-famous "banned list" barring unfriendly media from a Palin book event in Wasilla.

The new e-mails range from the mundane (Todd repeatedly trying to get a photo of him in a t-shirt removed from the National Governors Association Web site) to the intriguing (one e-mail that was withheld bears the subject line, "media questions about Todd Palin's work and potential conflict of interests"). MSNBC.com has many more details.

MSNBC has posted a searchable database of the new e-mails here. Let us know in the comments if you see anything of interest.

http://tpmmuckraker.talkingpointsmemo.com/2010/02/internal_emails_show_robust_role_for_shadow_govern.php?ref=fpb

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 12:45 PM | Report abuse

I have one simple test: if the health bill dies from neglect and irresolution, Obama is no leader.


He is a follower. He cannot vote present on this one. He has majorities in both Houses and a landslide victory and he is unable to deliver on a core priority in his first year. That's a definition of a failed presidency and it is why the GOP - with nothing to offer the country - decided to make it his Waterloo. They knew and know how gutting this bill and killing reform and suffocating any serious change in this country is their way to a nihilist victory. And such a victory would not be a vindication of Republican policy right now. It would be a perfectly reasonable response to a Democratic party palpably incapable of governing and a president clearly unable to deliver.

If he cannot do this, he does not have the fortitude to be a successful president. And his weakness on this will be rightly interpreted as weakness everywhere else. That applies to foreign policy as well, with Netanyahu and Khamenei and Chavez and Sarkozy all watching to see what this guy is made of.

These are dark times as the forces of reaction and resistance redouble their efforts to prevent any reform on any issue. Obama was elected to break through that impasse. If he cannot deliver, he must cede to someone who can.

Andrew sullivan, the turncoat wimp. Et tu?

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 12:44 PM | Report abuse

There is more than one broadwayjoe?
No wonder 37th thinks there is a room full of libs working in a DNC basement somewhere bent on insulting right wing Fix trolls.

Posted by: shrink2 | February 5, 2010 12:42 PM | Report abuse

TO: broadwayjoe @ 10:51 a.m.

You are the same broadway joe who said s50 may be onto something, right?

The fact that my posts are finally getting through on the first try -- as opposed to years of prior restraint, often outright (apparent government) interception and censorship, tells me that some important people on the inside want the truth to come out.

So if you are referring to certain secretive agencies of the federal government as the party that needs "recovery," I am in agreement with you.

***

WITHOUT JUSTICE, POLITICS IS JUST BREAD AND CIRCUSES.
WITHOUT JUSTICE, A JOB IS JUST SLAVERY BY ANOTHER NAME.

http://nowpublic.com/world/u-s-silently-tortures-americans-cell-tower-microwaves
http://nowpublic.com/world/gestapo-usa-govt-funded-vigilante-network-terrorizes-america
www.poynter.org/subject.asp?id=2 (see articles list) OR NowPublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener50 | February 5, 2010 12:35 PM | Report abuse

You just can't make this kind of stuff up:

President Barack Obama said he can't catch as much college hoops as he'd like, but relies on ESPN to keep him up to date.

In a mid-game interview on CBS during last week's Duke-Georgetown game at the Verizon Center in D.C., the president tried his hand at some color commentary.

You know, when times are good and things are going well, this sort of sh!t flies. When times are bad, and things aren't going well, it doesn't. Bambi's doing college hoops, and in the mean time 59 Democrats in the Senate are waiting for him to do something - anything - to give them the sort of guidance (and political cover) they need to get his top legislative priority passed.

Lordy. Isn't there anyone in the White House with the requisite amount of brains/balls necessary to convince Barack Obama that it might be better to be seen working at his job than flicking around calling a basketball game? Do you get the feeling Bambi will still be "fighting" for health care reform in January of 2012?

His man needs to focus. What it's looking like more and more is that what we have is an ADD presidency.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 12:34 PM | Report abuse

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/04/AR2010020404307.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

Milbank on the death of John McCain's iconoclasm.

This actually makes me kind of sad. I realized that McCain was willing to do anything to be President, but I was always hoping that he would go back to his old ways after the election. This hasn't happened and McCain seems to have gotten even more partisan. Even positions that he had taken during the campaign such as one on fair trials seem to have vanished.

I suppose having to play a character for the last half of the Bush administration really stuck with him. I also think the guy is very bitter at losing the election. I do think McCain sincerely believes he was more deserving given his service to his country both in the military and in politics and this "neophyte" shouldn't have been anywhere close.

But yeah, McCain was one of the few Republicans I respected. I'll hold out for a little while, I guess, but not for long.

Posted by: DDAWD | February 5, 2010 12:33 PM | Report abuse

The ADD President...
Remember last week? Barack Obama doesn't. The Attention Deficit Disorder President is at it again: Last week was Fiscal Responsibility Week at the White House, with budget freezes and deficit reduction commissions and lots of tough talk about cutting spending and being responsible. Well, it's a new week, and a new Obama theme (to be announced), so we shouldn't be completely surprised by this:

President Obama is sending Congress a $3.8 trillion budget on Monday that will increase spending in the fight against high unemployment, boost taxes on the wealthy and freeze spending for a number of government programs.

The deficit for this year would surge to a record-breaking $1.6 trillion, according to a congressional official who had access to a White House summary document. That deficit would easily top last year's then-record $1.41 trillion gap.

It's like last week never happened... Which seems to sum up so much of Bambi's presidency to date.

Troubling? Yes. But none of this would have happened if the Republicans had been bipartisan, you know

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 12:31 PM | Report abuse

jaxas -- Senator Shelby [R- Wingnuttia] is going for the biggest pork of all, with a hold on 70 appointees -- mostly to the Defense Dept -- for a big juicy chunk of the pig for his state.

So much for small government!

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 12:27 PM | Report abuse

Remember when the NAACP was actually relevant? Me neither. They're kind of up there with NOW in the '60s edition of "Whatever happened to...?" Anyway, every now and then the NAACP needs to underscore the fact they aren't to be taken seriously, and they did so this week by releasing their civil rights "scores" for Congress. Unsurprisingly, we find out that All Republicans and/or Conservatives are, in fact, racists:

The NAACP is out with its annual report card, and Republicans have been awarded F's virtually across the board, thanks to their position on a variety of civil right issues, most notably their killing of the DC voting rights bill.

The ratings were on a variety of Congressional measures the organization deemed to be civil rights related, including the nominations of Hillary Clinton and Eric Holder, expanding children's' health insurance, hate crimes legislation, foreclosure and credit card bills, the stimulus and the DC voting and gun rights votes.

Got that? You vote against Hillary Clinton for Secretary of State, or Obama's stimulus package, or restrictions on the citizenry's 2nd Amendment rights and you're voting against "civil rights". And at this very moment, you can bet there are NAACP staffers wondering why they're getting a blurb at Politico rather than a front page at the New York Times.

Much like NOW, the NAACP has gone from an independent organization focusing on important, fundamental issues to an organization that is an adjunct of the Democratic Party focusing on Democratic Party issues. Which is of no interest whatsoever to Republicans, Conservatives or Independents.

A good measure of just how ineffectual the NAACP is these days is to note that in a country as neurotic about race as the USA, hardly anyone actually cares what they think. That's really sad.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 12:27 PM | Report abuse

If you see Sen. Jim DeMint, start calling him Wellington since the health care bill is starting to look a lot like Waterloo after all.


The delightfully profane Dennis the Peasant: “Now I'd be the last person in the blogosphere to accuse progressives of being a bunch of [the term Rahm Emanuel used that offended Sarah Palin], but just where have you folks been, and what have you been smoking? Barack Obama isn't going to champion health care reform with the public and he certainly isn't going to fight for health care reform in the halls of Congress. That's hard work which requires focus, discipline, and fortitude. That just isn't Bambi's style . . . Hey, always remember: You got what you wanted. Enjoy.”

Mmm. My Schadenfreude tastes like bratwurst!

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 12:23 PM | Report abuse

"If you don't believe me that the media has a preference for this Tea Party style of get together, just watch the disparate coverage the Tea Party convention gets as oppsioed to the DNC convention.

Posted by: jaxas70"

This actually reminds me of a Howard Kurtz chat. Someone asked him about the ethics of CNN and the other networks airing a Limbaugh speech for CPAC. Essentially free advertising for Republican bile.

Kurtz's response was something along the lines of saying that the networks air Obama speeches, so why shouldn't they balance it out with Limbaugh speeches?

That was literally jaw dropping for me. Equating a radio talk show host with the President.

Posted by: DDAWD | February 5, 2010 12:23 PM | Report abuse

drindl, the same mind-set describes landing Coats for the Indiana Senate race as "a major coup." That was a foolish way to frame Coats' candidacy and I'm sure it was pretty much a cut and paste from the RNC's news blast.


Posted by: margaretmeyers | February 5, 2010 12:21 PM | Report abuse

This is what republicans have accomplished -- the guarantee of swelling deficits far into the future.


Health Care Reform: The Cost of Doing Nothing


Conversation among Washington wonks, corporate chieftains and health-care executives isn't any longer about how "health reform" will work in practice. It's abot what happens if nothing happens.

Barring a political miracle, we're going to learn the cost of doing nothing—nothing significant to restrain health-care cost increases, nothing to prod the health-care system to produce more benefit for each dollar it takes, nothing to expand health-insurance coverage.

This, too, will be ugly and unpopular.

"Failure to enact health reform will result in increasing numbers of people without health insurance because fewer employers will offer it and many employees will not be able to pay the cost of plans that are available," predicts Stephen Zuckerman, a health economist at Washington's Urban Institute think tank.

"For people not offered employer coverage, many will not be able to get coverage due to pre-existing conditions that insurers won't cover or because premiums simply won't be affordable. Even people with coverage will find costs becoming a greater financial burden," he said.

And all of us—employers, workers and taxpayers—will spend ever more on health care.

The numbers are so large they're hard to grasp. The U.S. health-care tab in 2009 was $2.5 trillion, equal to 17.3% of the nation's gross domestic product, the sum of all its output, much bigger than 2008's 16.2% because the recession depressed GDP. The economy will grow again, of course, but health-care costs will rise even faster. In a new forecast, the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services predict that without some big change, health care will amount to 19.3% of GDP by 2019.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703575004575043123039400004.html

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 12:20 PM | Report abuse

The idiot who worships me so much he mimicks my name proves my point about the MSM -- it has been hijacked by the radical rightwingers.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 12:15 PM | Report abuse

alternative theory of the universe:

Liberals are out of control with spending and government largess as well as demonstrating culpable weakness on foreign policy. the voters never wanted this when they voted for the "centrist" Obama. Berry has revealed himself as an avowed socialist and the vast majority is standing athwart history shouting NO.

Liberals can't hear because they are busy lecturing everyone about how smart they are. smart enough to lose three elections in a row, that is.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 12:15 PM | Report abuse

"The only reason independents vote for Brown is that they were gullble enought to buy into his gauzy, appealing sound bites that were created for him by Frank Luntz focus groups and the silly overgeneralized pap that sells just like toothpaste commercials sell.

I also pointed out that there was an obscene giddiness in the way the pundits and pollsters were almost gleefully reporting big name democrats in trouble."

yes, jaxas -- and it emphasizes the Biggest Lie in Politics -- that the media is liberal. You can't help but notice the zeal with which Cilizza attacks Dems every day and praises to the skies the idiotic utterings of every dumb repub that comes down the pike.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

I have to wonder how all of those dumb, gullible Massachusetts independents are going to react once they wake up and realize that Scott Brown is nothing more than another GOP obstructionist. All that gauzy talk of being a reform candidate will stick in their craws when he starts voting just lie the average GOP hypocrite.

I can't wait until he chops off a big piece of stinking pork for Massachusetts similar to what Ben Nelson and Mary Landrieu did got their states. I hope they choke on it.

Posted by: jaxas70 | February 5, 2010 12:05 PM | Report abuse

the WaPo redeems itself for the moment.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


Every political community includes some members who insist that their side has all the answers and that their adversaries are idiots. But American liberals, to a degree far surpassing conservatives, appear committed to the proposition that their views are correct, self-evident, and based on fact and reason, while conservative positions are not just wrong but illegitimate, ideological and unworthy of serious consideration. Indeed, all the appeals to bipartisanship notwithstanding, President Obama and other leading liberal voices have joined in a chorus of intellectual condescension.

It's an odd time for liberals to feel smug. But even with Democratic fortunes on the wane, leading liberals insist that they have almost nothing to learn from conservatives. Many Democrats describe their troubles simply as a PR challenge, a combination of conservative misinformation -- as when Obama charges that critics of health-care reform are peddling fake fears of a "Bolshevik plot" -- and the country's failure to grasp great liberal accomplishments. "We were so busy just getting stuff done . . . that I think we lost some of that sense of speaking directly to the American people about what their core values are," the president told ABC's George Stephanopoulos in a recent interview. The benighted public is either uncomprehending or deliberately misinformed (by conservatives).

This condescension is part of a long liberal tradition that for generations has impoverished American debates over the economy, social issues and the functions of government -- and threatens to do so again today, when dialogue would be more valuable than ever.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/04/AR2010020403698.html

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 12:05 PM | Report abuse

Sorry to burst your bubble Chris but the majority of the Country could not care about mid-term elections, or the 'Tea Birthers'. The group is just a bunch of people who are angry at the world, the only thing they are missing are tin foil hats.

While they yell and scream, as they did last year in the Town Halls, most will be watching the Super Bowl.

Posted by: PatrickNYC1 | February 5, 2010 12:04 PM | Report abuse

Political book:

Washingtoon, by Mark Alan Stamaty.
It appeared in the Voice back in the 1980s and also in the Post on Monday mornings.
I think one collection was done, but all those cartoons should be collected and reprinted.

His take on Judge Bork was absolutely hilarious, and shows with very few words, why Bork crashed.

Posted by: edlharris | February 5, 2010 12:03 PM | Report abuse

And this is how Rs want to 'balance' the budget' -- pull tthe plug on granny:

"Paul Ryan's budget -- and the details of its CBO score -- is also an object lesson in why so few politicians are willing to answer the question "but how will you save all that money?"

As you all know by now, the long-term budget deficit is largely driven by health-care costs. To move us to surpluses, Ryan's budget proposes reforms that are nothing short of violent.

Medicare is privatized. Seniors get a voucher to buy private insurance, and the voucher's growth is far slower than the expected growth of health-care costs. Medicaid is also privatized. The employer tax exclusion is fully eliminated, replaced by a tax credit that grows more slowly than medical costs. And beyond health care, Social Security gets private accounts that CBO says will actually cost more than the present arrangement, further underscoring how ancillary the program is to our budget problem.'

it's all about shovelliing taxpayer money into Wall Street and cat food for old folks.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 12:03 PM | Report abuse

Thank you drindl. I will try to recogitate the thoughts I had in the posting that never was. In that post, I pointed out that the independent voters--whom Cillizza seems quite taken with--probably did not give a single thought to the notion that all they were doing was giving the GOP another reliable No vote. That nothing in that election would imply that some imminent change that would better their lives was coming forth.

I pointed out that I would wager that not a single one of those independents gave any thought that Scott Brown was little more than a traditional republican who would call for keeping the Bush tax cuts, would vote against pay-as-you-go, would be opposed to to regulating the banks and Wall Street investment firms that caused this meltdown in the first place, would oppose any health care system that would rein in health insurance costs, would be opposed to any reforms in the budgeting system, would oppose efforts to expand green technology, would oppose bringing troops home from Iraq and Afghanistan, would oppose any efforts to bring down exploding Defense spending and would support privatization of social security and medicare.

The only reason independents vote for Brown is that they were gullble enought to buy into his gauzy, appealing sound bites that were created for him by Frank Luntz focus groups and the silly overgeneralized pap that sells just like toothpaste commercials sell.

I also pointed out that there was an obscene giddiness in the way the pundits and pollsters were almost gleefully reporting big name democrats in trouble.

If you don't believe me that the media has a preference for this Tea Party style of get together, just watch the disparate coverage the Tea Party convention gets as oppsioed to the DNC convention.

Posted by: jaxas70 | February 5, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

The pro-corruption caucus never rests and it rewards their foot soldiers with work through the many brushes with the law that they have.

A good case in point is Susan Ralston. She was Jack Abramoff’s secretary/confidant and gate-keeper for years. Then she went to work in the same role for Karl Rove (and serve as an important member of Team Abramoff in the White House. Here you can see a photo of Susan with Jack and many members of the gang (she is the one sitting in front of Jack). Most folks in that photo have either had charges filed against them or are still under investigation. Susan falls into the latter category. It was only last August when the Department of Justice named her as a co-conspirator in the Abramoff Scandal.

To say that she is under a cloud of suspicion would be an understatement. And yet, Republicans are more than willing to hire her to raise money for them and organize their affairs. The St. Petersburg Times reported yesterday that Ralston is the point of contact for a major GOP fundraiser for seven Republican Candidates for Senate this year.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:54 AM | Report abuse

"jaxas -- try posting again. look through and make sure you don't have any words that might be construed as objectionable -- some in the filter are pretty silly -- and try again. it might be too long also -- try posting it in two parts.

i think the hold mechanism is automatic, as far as i can tell. keep trying, i'd like to read what you had to say.

Posted by: drindl"

lol@someone thinking that this place is being moderated. Yeah, I'm sure that's what's going on.

Jaxas, use the scrivner posts as a benchmark. If what you're trying to post is somewhat longer than that, then it will get blocked. Just post in two parts.

Posted by: DDAWD | February 5, 2010 11:54 AM | Report abuse

I think there is s special filter for really moronic stuff. Obviously, liberals get caught in it quite often.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 11:53 AM | Report abuse

To me — and I’m not alone in this — the sudden outbreak of deficit hysteria brings back memories of the groupthink that took hold during the run-up to the Iraq war. Now, as then, dubious allegations, not backed by hard evidence, are being reported as if they have been established beyond a shadow of a doubt. Now, as then, much of the political and media establishments have bought into the notion that we must take drastic action quickly, even though there hasn’t been any new information to justify this sudden urgency. Now, as then, those who challenge the prevailing narrative, no matter how strong their case and no matter how solid their background, are being marginalized.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:52 AM | Report abuse

jaxas, drindl is correct. I worked with ceflynline on this issue (before he quit The Fix in disgust).

You can post things like stinking yeast stuffed vagina (I remember one night someone pushing the envelope and the most amazing things got through, it was hilarious), but you can't post other words that are offensive only to the most PC. There is no chance CC or anyone else is watching blogs comment posts go by deciding one by one which to let fly and which to squash.

Posted by: shrink2 | February 5, 2010 11:46 AM | Report abuse

The ideological extremism of his policies is only surpassed by his flailing incompetence in administering them.

The result -- his posture of relaxation and retreat -- has been an unmitigated disaster. He went out of his way to avoid identifying the Fort Hood jihadist as a terrorist; he admonished us not to jump to any conclusions about the Christmas underwear bomber; he promised to close Gitmo with no plan to relocate the prisoners; he moved the trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed to ground zero with utterly no consideration for the local or national security implications involved; and his Justice Department allowed the Christmas bomber to lawyer up after only 50 minutes of interrogation.

After the public outcry over his reckless and foolish policies, he's backtracking like an indecisive neophyte, sort of like the time when he endlessly vacillated over whether to crank up our operations in Afghanistan.

He just can't seem to grasp that the real world involves more than street organizing, speechmaking, symbolic gestures and his grand appearance on the world stage as a veritable messiah. His miscalculations are disturbingly naive.

In fact, the verdict on Obama's messianic approach is already in. Despite his overtures, his own CIA director, Leon Panetta, just testified that al-Qaida is growing and gearing for an attack in the United States in the next three to six months.

No worries. If it happens, he can blame Bush for that, too.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 11:45 AM | Report abuse

The NAACP released its annual report card looking at how federal lawmakers voted on civil rights issues, such as hate crimes, D.C. voting rights, and expanding children’s health insurance. Glenn Thrush looks at some of the main points from the report:

– All Senate Republicans got an F but two (Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins, Maine — they got C’s)

– All Senate Democrats and Independents got A’s, B’s or Incompletes

– Senator Arlen Specter, R-to-D-Penn., got a B

– All House Republicans but 6 got an F — 5 of those 6 got D’s — 1 got a C: Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida.

– House Republicans scored the lowest of an sub group.

– All BUT 23 House Democrats got A’s, B’s or Incompletes

– All Congressman who scored a 100% were Democrats

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:45 AM | Report abuse

'Yesterday during an interview with Don Imus on Fox Business, Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace was promoting his interview this week with former Alaska governor Sarah Palin. When Imus randomly asked whether she will “be sitting on your lap” during the interview, Wallace replied, “One can only hope.” This morning, Fox and Friends host Steve Doocy asked Wallace about his comment. Co-host Gretchen Carlson was flabbergasted by the exchange between Wallace and Imus, and asked, “Would you ask that of a man?” Wallace was silent for a few seconds before stumbling over a response .'

This is what palin is all about to the boys on the right...

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:42 AM | Report abuse

prairiepopulist writes
"Since MN had caucuses on Tuesday (underreported here), what do you think bsimon about the candidates?

1. RT Rybak -- mayor of MPLS
2. Margaret Anderson Kelliher -- speaker of the House
3. John Marty -- 24-year state senator; son of theologian Martin Marty

Do you think one of these will be endorsed?"


I have no idea who the dems will endorse. I am heartened by the caucus straw poll showing RT & Kelliher in the lead. Personally I'd like to see RT as Gov; but I'm skeptical he can win the endorsement because he doesn't seem to appeal to the DFL establishment.

I don't know much about Marty, other than his zeal for a MN single-payer proposal (details, for the interested, are here: http://www.minnpost.com/community_voices/2010/01/29/15447/better_approach_to_health_care_a_single_payer_solution_for_obama ).

In the interest of balance, the GOP side has another 'no taxes, ever' candidate in the lead (which should be no surprise), state Rep Marty Seifert. I don't think he'll do well among independents this year; Minnesotans want a leader who can solve the budget deficit without tying one hand behind their back. Pawlenty's budget gimmicks and 'no taxes, ever (except 'fees')' policies have run there course here & people are looking for real solutions.

Posted by: bsimon1 | February 5, 2010 11:40 AM | Report abuse

'Yesterday, CongressDaily (sub. req.) reported that Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) had “placed a blanket hold on all executive nominations on the Senate calendar in an effort to win concessions from the Obama administration and Pentagon.” In a move that is “a far more aggressive use of the power than is normal,” Shelby is holding up more than 70 nominees.

Some of the nominees Shelby is blocking include “the top Intelligence officers at the State Department and the Department of Homeland Security as well as the number three civilian at the Pentagon.” Yesterday, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) objected on behalf of Shelby when Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) attempted to bring some of the national security nominees up for a vote:

The reason? Shelby is concerned his state might lose some lucrative defense contracts.

In other words – pork.

In particular, Shelby has laid down the unprecedented blanket hold in order to gain leverage for his home state interests on two federal contracts:

– A $40 billion contract to build air-to-air refueling tankers. From CongressDaily: “Northrop/EADS team would build the planes in Mobile, Ala., but has threatened to pull out of the competition unless the Air Force makes changes to a draft request for proposals.” Federal Times offers more details on the tanker deal, and also confirms its connection to the hold.

– An improvised explosive device testing lab for the FBI. From CongressDaily: “[Shelby] is frustrated that the Obama administration won’t build” the center, which Shelby earmarked $45 million for in 2008. The center is due to be based “at the Army’s Redstone Arsenal.”

Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI), the chairman of the Armed Forces Committee, expressed his “frustration” and “dismay” over “the road blocks which have been placed in the way of Senate nominations for key positions at the Department of Defense” on the Senate floor yesterday. “Nobody has informed me of any concern about the qualifications of anyone of these five nominees and yet there’s an objection here on the floor of the Senate,” said Levin. W

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:38 AM | Report abuse

jaxas -- try posting again. look through and make sure you don't have any words that might be construed as objectionable -- some in the filter are pretty silly -- and try again. it might be too long also -- try posting it in two parts.

i think the hold mechanism is automatic, as far as i can tell. keep trying, i'd like to read what you had to say.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:36 AM | Report abuse

I wonder if the 1.1 million people who are so frustrated and unhappy that they have stopped even looking for work would agree that this is a triumph for Obimbo?

Magic eight ball says doubtful.

Perhaps some chanting is on order:

Mmmmmmmm mmmmmmmm mmmmmmmm.

I suggest you think a little about statistics before you demonstrate your utter ignorance of the subject. We need no additional evidence of liberal economic incompetence.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 11:34 AM | Report abuse

Oh come on drivl! If that unemployment rate had ticked up to 10.3 instead of down to 9.7, are you telling us you wouldn't be all over it blaming Obama's policies.

So this is how it goes on the right eh? If it goes up its his fault. If it goes down, he gets no credit.

Just try selling that crap to Obama's supporters. He got a break today and they should hype it just as much as you trogs on the right hype it when he gets bad news.

Posted by: jaxas70 | February 5, 2010 11:29 AM | Report abuse

Isn’t this the same man who said that more Americans should learn a foreign language — even though he doesn’t speak any himself?

""It’s embarrassing when Europeans come over here, they all speak English, they speak French, they speak German. And then we go over to Europe and all we can say is merci beaucoup, right?""

Speak for yourself, Mr. President.

http://bigjournalism.com/mwalsh/2010/02/05/teleprompter-lets-commander-in-chief-down-as-he-misprounces-corpsman-mangles-french/#more-18206

worth a laugh at mr teleprompters only skill fading away.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 11:28 AM | Report abuse

"and here's the appropriately racist kickoff to the Tea party:

'Nashville, Tennessee (CNN) – Tom Tancredo opened what's being billed as the first Tea Party Convention with a bang.

The former congressman from Colorado and 2008 Republican presidential candidate blasted President Obama, saying "people who could not even spell the word 'vote', or say it in English, put a committed socialist ideologue in the White House. His name is Barack Hussein Obama."

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:15 AM"
__________

Case closed, d.

Janeane Garofalo had it right:

"Garofalo ripped into tea party protesters, or what some of the wizards of smart on the left have deemed "tea baggers" calling them "functionally retarded adults" and "racists." "Do you remember tea baggers?" Garofalo said. "It was just so much easier when we could just call them racists. I just don't know why we can't call them racists, or functionally retarded adults.""

May we hear no more in this space about the tea baggers being about "anti-government" or "tax reform." Enough already.



Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 11:26 AM | Report abuse

Apparently, Chris Cillizza has a very thin skin. He is holding back on a hard hitting piece I wrote that fundamentally challenges his objectivity. In that piece, I was not disrespectful, I used no inappropriate language and I simply questioned where the minds of these independent voters he seems so taken with really are.

All I did Chris was list all of the things that the GOP traditionally puts out as their "solutions" and how I believed that not a single one of these independent voters who voted for Scott Brown seemed to have even a modest inkling that all they were doing was simply giving an obstructionist GOP another No vote.

Why are you holding up that Posting Chris. Did I get just a little too close to the mark on you and Charlie Cook?

Posted by: jaxas70 | February 5, 2010 11:24 AM | Report abuse

"You've seen the reports that Sen. Richard Shelby (R) of Alabama has taken the perhaps unprecedented step of placing holds on ALL of President Obama's nominees until he gets the money for a couple of big earmarked pork barrel projects he feels entitled to back in his home state.

It's an eye-popper no doubt, with gallons more audacity than Obama ever could have hoped for. But I wonder if this story might not end up amounting to much more than the sum of its parts because it brings together three or four of the issues roiling American politics today in a bundle of smack-you-in-the-face arrogance that's too much to ignore.

For Republicans and the Tea Party set you've got pork-barrel spending and earmarks, two catchwords that are frequently abused and used to paint with too broad a brush but in this case seem pretty fairly to describe a senior senator's power to wrestle tens of billions of federal dollars back into his home state.

For Democrats, there's the outrage at archaic Senate obstructionism which has rapidly escalated from annoying to outrageous to pure comedy with a mind-numbing speed. It's the heart of the story about the demise of Health Care Reform, the slow death of so many unobjectionable nominees and much else.

In this case, we're not dealing with a stand on partisanship or ideology or simple political shiv play which I guess can each be respected in their own place. This is more like just a stick up. Gimme my money and I'll give you your Senate back! Worse than a squeegee man and not much better than a bank robber, Shelby is shutting down the president's ability to appoint anyone to anything until he gets his way. In a sense Shelby's gambit is little different from what countless other senators of both parties have done in the past, using the senate rules to get the White House's attention to pry some money free from the federal government. But the scale is unheard and the moment is different. The only mystery about this one is which is more outrageous -- Shelby's hold or the fact that the rest of the senators of both parties allow it."

http://www.talkingpointsmemo.com/archives/2010/02/senate_shark_jump_announced.php#more?ref=fpblg

time to get rid of the filibuster. this is absurd.

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:24 AM | Report abuse

TelePrompter lets Commander-in-Chief
Down as He Misprounces ‘Corpsman,’
Mangles French
Big Journalism, by Michael Walsh Surely, the White House has someone on the staff who can teach the President how to pronounce the word “corpsman.” It would also be great if someone in media knew what a corpsman is, but the Harvard-educated press’s knowledge of anything having to do with the military is limited to the phrases ”baby killers” and “exit strategy,” so there’s probably not much hope there.

CORPSE MAN?

Maybe a foreshadow of his own future.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 11:24 AM | Report abuse

The only americans much interested in the Tea Party are the Cocktail Party elites in DC, the pundits and politicians who hobnob together in their tight little closed circle. the rest of us know it's a stink bomb that will soon dissipate.

'A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey indicates that 26 percent of the public has an unfavorable view of the Tea Party movement and that 4 in 10 have not heard of the movement or don't know enough to form an opinion.'

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:19 AM | Report abuse

DDAWD - berry is for the saints, so I guess that means they will lose.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 11:18 AM | Report abuse

Are you liberals really that daft? the "drop" in the unemployment rate is due to over one million job seekers simply giving up looking for work. they were not hired. their jobs were not saved or created. Jobs were lost last month. there is nothing to crow about here. It is bad news. this is just more ammunition for the overreaching, overspending failure that is the liberal governance.

Posted by: drivl | February 5, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

Tancredo says Obama won because we lack a 'literacy test before people vote '

Should voting rights be subject to a literacy test?

http://www.youpolls.com/default.asp

.

Posted by: usadblake | February 5, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

and here's the appropriately racist kickoff to the Tea party:

'Nashville, Tennessee (CNN) – Tom Tancredo opened what's being billed as the first Tea Party Convention with a bang.

The former congressman from Colorado and 2008 Republican presidential candidate blasted President Obama, saying "people who could not even spell the word 'vote', or say it in English, put a committed socialist ideologue in the White House. His name is Barack Hussein Obama."

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:15 AM | Report abuse

Yes, jrosco, don't look for positive stories about Democrats here, on in most of the WaPo. It's all about Republicans and how everything is good news for them... and here's more R news - from Ezra Klein, one of the better bloggers at WaPo:

;The news of the day, as I mentioned earlier, is that Richard Shelby has decided to place a hold on everything that eats, breathes or moves unless Alabama gets a couple billion more in pork. Before we take a step further on this, it's worth noting that Shelby is doing exactly what Ben Nelson did, but attaching a larger price tag to his demands: He's threatening to obstruct Senate business unless his state gets billions in giveaways. Nelson settled for hundreds of millions. Nebraskans must be pissed."

gee, what happned to small government?

Posted by: drindl | February 5, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

So, who does everyone like in the Superbowl?

(there's only one correct answer, so get it right!)

Posted by: DDAWD | February 5, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

MM, I gotta go with the 600.

In terms of "political news and analysis," the fact only 600 showed up in Nashville, Country Music's mecca, is powerful evidence the tea bag "movement" was always an anti-BHO false media narrative. More than that show up for Porter Wagonner impersonators.

The good news, though, is at least for one day, those 600 will not be throwing rocks off highway overpasses or crowding into Piggly Wiggly to redeem smashed aluminum soda cans. :)

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Are we going to get a Most Important Number of the Day?

Will it be the 600 -- the approximate number of registered attendees for the TEA Party convention (there's a groundswell for you).
Or will it be 9.7 -- the new unemployment rate? If we can match that .3% drop for a few months I don't see voter dissatisfaction with incumbents featuring in the autumn, do you?

And I love the picture of Mark's bachelor party. I hope they were all drinking Grey Goose and cranberry juice: renal system health is so important as we age!

Posted by: margaretmeyers | February 5, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

s50. The first step in recovery is acknowledgment. Hang in there, bud.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 10:51 AM | Report abuse

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35238034/ns/politics/

Todd Palin, Assitant Governor of Alaska! It was a really important position. Someone had to cut off unfriendly press, lie about tanning bed installation, help with budget planning and make decisions about oil shale leasing.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | February 5, 2010 10:49 AM | Report abuse

...and how do you write anything about the tea bag party without mentioning the notorious sign that its "founder and President" (according to media reports), Dale Robertson, carried?

http://washingtonindependent.com/73036/n-word-sign-dogs-would-be-tea-party-leader

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 10:48 AM | Report abuse

Personal to broadwayjoe:

Hey -- I could use some help here.

If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem. Tell your pals. CC, too.

http://NowPublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener50 | February 5, 2010 10:48 AM | Report abuse

Eric, its not even a thousand people it is around 600 actual attendents. The other 300-400 are press and staff from what I heard.

Posted by: AndyR3 | February 5, 2010 10:42 AM | Report abuse

Disappointing on many levels:

Sadly, 6 checks:
Free publicity for the Tea Party "movement." Check.
Free Cook Political Report Ad (doesn't the Post business department want someone to pay for these ads?). Check.
Pawlenty in 2012 (who nobody in D.C. cares or talks about). Check.
Free Meg Whitman ad. Check.
No positive mention of the 44th President of the United States. Check.
GOP comeback. Check.
__________

But most disappointing is the treatment of the tea bag party (in a Post-sponsored blog) as a legitimate "movement" rather than the racist proxy agenda that NUMEROUS award-winning MSM journalists have revealed it to be.

Too bad we can't read in the Washington Post something like the following insight on this "movement." From the New York Times' Frank Rich:

"That demographic is white and non-urban: Just look at the stops and the faces on her carefully calibrated book tour. The affect is emotional — the angry air of grievance that emerged first at her campaign rallies in 2008, with their shrieked threats to Obama, and that has since resurfaced in the Hitler-fixated “tea party” movement (which she endorses in her book). It’s a politics of victimization and sloganeering with no policy solutions required beyond the conservative mantra of No Taxes. Its standard-bearer can make stuff up with impunity: “Thanks, but no thanks on that bridge to nowhere”; Obama’s “palling around with terrorists”; health care “death panels.”"

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/22/opinion/22rich.html

Thank you, Mr. Rich.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | February 5, 2010 10:38 AM | Report abuse

Present ident TelePrompTer hasn't had a press conference since July. Why is he so petrified of answering a few questions? Perhaps without three days preparation , his utter cluelessness emerges.

Posted by: Moonbat | February 5, 2010 10:35 AM | Report abuse

Wow, 1,000 people. Ya know...next weekend the Gaylord around here will be hostign a convention that will draw close to 10,000 people. It's an anime convention called katsucon. 10,000 people, and not a lick of national media pumping.

So...yeah. Other than being an insult to good tea everywhere thw shindig in Nashville don't impress me much.

Posted by: EricS2 | February 5, 2010 10:35 AM | Report abuse

Jaxas,
I don't think that the polls say that the GOP will retake the congress at all. The only people saying that are the pundits like Charlie Cook and CC who make a living trying to predict these things. I will remind you though that CC also said that McCain was dead in the water and their was no way he would win the nomination two years ago.
I think if you asked most people they are just worried, about everything and they want to see real solutions coming out of washington. That hasn't happened at a fast enough rate in their opinion (see what Mark wrote earlier). I think Cook and CC's predictions are way out of line since we still haven't seen who will win the primaries and if the TP group's nominees aren't chosen will they still come out and vote for the GOP, stay at home, or put up a third party candidate. Also if their nominee's are chosen will they beat the more moderate democrats or not? Florida will be the indicator for this IMO.

Posted by: AndyR3 | February 5, 2010 10:26 AM | Report abuse

Andy, thanks.

I suppose these numbers are updated as time goes on. Last November was initially considered a job shedding month, but was updated recently to reflect an uptick in jobs.

Posted by: DDAWD | February 5, 2010 10:26 AM | Report abuse

bsimon1 says:

"MN should be on that list. Gov Pawlenty's legacy of fiscal mismanagment coupled with the GOP's 'no taxes, ever' platform has left the state budget in serious disarray."

I agree MN should be on the "almost certain to change hands list," though it would be even more likely if Pawlenty was running again.

Since MN had caucuses on Tuesday (underreported here), what do you think bsimon about the candidates?

1. RT Rybak -- mayor of MPLS
2. Margaret Anderson Kelliher -- speaker of the House
3. John Marty -- 24-year state senator; son of theologian Martin Marty

Do you think one of these will be endorsed?

Posted by: prairiepopulist | February 5, 2010 10:20 AM | Report abuse

Toyotas remind me of berry's spending. It accelerates out of control without the ability to apply any brakes. It dooms the passengers to a horrible crash.

Posted by: Moonbat | February 5, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

"A sharp increase in the number of people giving up looking for work helped to depress the jobless rate. The number of 'discouraged job seekers' rose to 1.1 million in January from 734,000 a year ago."

"What is throwing people off is probably the 9.7 percent unemployment rate -- the drop in the unemployment rate --, which is positive but is not coming from new jobs created its coming from people dropping out of the work force.

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6142SH20100205

Posted by: doof | February 5, 2010 10:17 AM | Report abuse

DDAWD,
The monthly job rate is calculated from a group of companies and orginizations, whereas the unemployment rate (9.7 now) is calculated from all of the governements unemployment data and it is considered the best indicator of overall employment which is why when it went above 10% it was such a big deal.

Posted by: AndyR3 | February 5, 2010 10:15 AM | Report abuse

I believe that Americans are being sold a bill of goods. And you know how lazy and politically ambivalent American voters--especially independents--can be. H. L. Mencken famously observed that nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people. And their conduct of late seems to bear that out. Else, how can one logically explain the 180 degree turn they made on democrats after having given them a vast majority in Congress?

I know, I know--the economy, loss of jobs, the health care debacle. But look folks, Obama and the democrats did not create this mess. If these independents spent more time actually reading and thinking instead of watching their fav pundits on television or listening to idiotic talk radio, they might gain a better understanding of where we are, how we got here and just who is really responsible for the mess we are in.

But for me, the biggest indicator yet of just how stupid and gullible the voters have become is that--if polls are to be believed--they are about to put back in power in Congress, the very people who caused the economic and financial problems they are all suffering from.

I guarantee you folks that if you put the GOP back in office, the very first act they will undertake is to reinstate the Bush tax cuts, probably make them permanent, deregulate the banks and financial institutions along with the rest of the corporate sector, increase spending in Defense and call for more foreign interventions, and pay for it through borrowing while insisting that as soon as the tax cuts for the wealthy work their way trough the economy, jobs and growth will return.

Now do you believe that? I guess you do if these polls are correct. Believe me, it will be the biggest mistake you ever made. It will turn a steady recovery into a Great Depression. Mark my words.

Posted by: jaxas70 | February 5, 2010 10:13 AM | Report abuse

Palin, Pawlenty, Whitman, Heye = Round up the usual suspects, and get out the shovels. It's going to start piling up.

***

URGENT TO THE GOOD PEOPLE ON THE INSIDE OF THE FBI (and I know you follow this blog)

cc: Obama White House security advisers; Washington press corps

The "distraction du jour" -- the big snowstorm -- is coming. So the microwave torturers at the MAGLOCLEN Mid-Atlantic fusion center in Newtown, Bucks County, PA are "upping the amplitude" in response to widely published articles exposing the misuse of the U.S. government's secret, nationwide cell tower- based microwave/laser directed energy weapon system...

...to attack, injure, impair and entrain unconstitutionally and unjustly "targeted" citizens.

YOU MUST ACT. NOW. IF YOU DO NOT, YOU ARE COMPLICIT AND NEGLIGENT BY YOUR INACTION.

And that goes for Team Obama, too.

WHY ARE YOU COVERING UP ATROCITIES AGAINST AMERICAN CITIZENS THAT WERE SPAWNED OR VASTLY EXPANDED UNDER BUSH-CHENEY?

And Washington press corps -- including WaPo:

WHY HAVE YOU NOT QUIZZED THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION ABOUT THIS?

PEOPLE ARE BEING HARMED AS A RESULT OF YOUR INACTION.

For details, see latest comments:

http://nowpublic.com/world/u-s-silently-tortures-americans-cell-tower-microwaves
http://nowpublic.com/world/gestapo-usa-govt-funded-vigilante-network-terrorizes-america
OR: NowPublic.com/scrivener (see "stories" list) OR poynter.org/subject.asp?id=2 (see "articles" list)

Posted by: scrivener50 | February 5, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

Bsimon that is really interesting about CS. The thing is the GOPs solution to that problem will be to cut more taxes so that people have more money to by new mowers to cut the grass in the park.

Mark, did you see that Representative Paul Ryan (R) released a plan for reducing the deficit by addressing entitlemnt reform, and Obama mentioned him in his meeting the the House republicans last week. There are things about his plan that I like (increasing retirement age, and reducing the rate of social security benefits, etc) and somethings I don't corporation tax cuts, privatizaiton of future medicare benefits. The thing is I think the democrats (and Obama) could use this as starting point for true entitlement reform. They could keep some of the ideas and then push for things like increasing the eligible payroll tax ceiling and then tacking it to inflation, or adding a plan that would increase the retirment age but allow people to by into medicare at 65, etc. Than they could say that any future surpluses in the budget is automatically split into half going to pay down the debt, and the other half is sent back to the taxpayers as a refund. Bascially I think if they tried they could get something together which actually might help to fix the long-term deficit. Here is the link to the story.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/04/AR2010020404238.html?hpid=topnews

Posted by: AndyR3 | February 5, 2010 10:11 AM | Report abuse

BB, you read the column on the lower unemployment rate, right?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/05/AR2010020500396.html?hpid=topnews

How is it that the total job count is reduced while UE rate is also reduced? Is it just a discrepancy between two different studies?

Posted by: DDAWD | February 5, 2010 10:06 AM | Report abuse

If Dems were smart, they would publicize the story of Colorado Springs more. CS is a 'famously tax-averse' city, and city government is cutting back services to live within their budget. That is the correct response to a reasonable choice made by voters: low taxes = low services. Tax cuts do not pay for themselves. If Dems were smart they would extrapolate that example to the Fed level.


http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_14303473

COLORADO SPRINGS — This tax-averse city is about to learn what it looks and feels like when budget cuts slash services most Americans consider part of the urban fabric.

More than a third of the streetlights in Colorado Springs will go dark Monday. The police helicopters are for sale on the Internet. The city is dumping firefighting jobs, a vice team, burglary investigators, beat cops — dozens of police and fire positions will go unfilled.

The parks department removed trash cans last week, replacing them with signs urging users to pack out their own litter.

Neighbors are encouraged to bring their own lawn mowers to local green spaces, because parks workers will mow them only once every two weeks. If that.


Posted by: bsimon1 | February 5, 2010 9:48 AM | Report abuse

Chris, I would appreciate it if you wouldn't make editorial comments that you really cannot back up. You say that "passion in politics is in short supply." where in the world did you come up with that?

Look. Passion, anger, frustration, irrationality, and conspiratorial convictions are running high in this country and have been for years. If anything, at the moment and indeed for the past 20 years or so, Americans have been blinded by this unaccountable anger on the right. The left gets angry as well but they don't show up at town halls with packing heat and making threatening, intimidating yelps like a pack of wild Australian dingoes.

This is why so many of us in the center and on the left are becoming increasingly angry ourselves. All we hear from pundits and analysts like you is this giddy high you all seem to have at the prospect of democrats losing big time in November. You have ignored the voices of moderate and liberal Americans and like the town hall bullies themselves, literally flooded the print, broadcast and television media with sentimental blubberings about how this low intellect, barbaric, bilesoaked gang that represents no more than 10% of the electorate when their silly, overgeneralized ideas are put on an actual ballot, is somehow, some way now to be considered a mainstream movement.

My question is this: Assuming this all washes out in November with the republicans back in charge of both Houses, then what? Does anyone have any idea of what they specifically propose to do about the intractable problems facing us? No, they don't. Why? Because cowards like you who have abandoned the central mission of professional journalists have allied with the right wing to conceal what it is they actually propose doing about any of the problems we face.

You have indeed committed the worst possible sin of a professional journalist: Instead of informing the public, you have misled them into believing that this insane band of morons who make up about 10% of the electorate is representative of the maionstream of American thinking.

I have nothing but contempt for you.

Posted by: jaxas70 | February 5, 2010 9:46 AM | Report abuse

Jaxas,
I have been saying for a while that when unemployment goes down the democratic prospects will improve quickly. I also feel that lowering of unemployment will lead to more lowering of unemployment since a good amount of our current recession is because of nervous investors and employers. The interesting thing about the unemployment data is that productivity, temp workers, and the length of the average work week all went up, which should all indicate more hiring in the future.

Posted by: AndyR3 | February 5, 2010 9:37 AM | Report abuse

Hey Mark, when I talk to most of my friends (who BTW are all employed) they feel the same way, that we just need to get some things done, and unemployment has to be addressed before we can actually do anything else. I do agree with your friend that getting the COC and Unions to work together would only happen if the State Puff Marshmellow man makes an apperance.

Posted by: AndyR3 | February 5, 2010 9:24 AM | Report abuse

Notwithstanding Charlie Cook's breathless giddiness, what I take away from this report is that as it stands right now, republicans are set to make gains but not take back either House. So, a traditional mid-term rather than a transformational sweep.

Note also that the unemployment rate just unexpectedly dropped to 9.7%. As that number dwindles and the dems get their act together, and the democratic base bvegins to reawaken as we near the elections in November, I would look for this giddiness on Charlie Cook;s part to dwindle. And Chris' as well.

Posted by: jaxas70 | February 5, 2010 9:23 AM | Report abuse

Is it just me or does this quote "But they're all waving American flags and speaking out against the galloping socialist agenda." remind any of you or the GREATEST Simpson's episode ever where aliens take over bill clinton and Bob Dole's bodies.

Posted by: AndyR3 | February 5, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

"At the gubernatorial level too, the editors at Cook see gains for the GOP -- three to five seats -- although the number of difficult open seats Republicans must defend (Rhode Island, Hawaii, California and Connecticut to name a few) make more widespread gains difficult."


MN should be on that list. Gov Pawlenty's legacy of fiscal mismanagment coupled with the GOP's 'no taxes, ever' platform has left the state budget in serious disarray. Gov Ventura was a more fiscally responsible executive, and left the state in better shape than Pawlenty will for his successor. I've been wrong before about the GOP's ability to fool the voters, but remain skeptical that they can do so again, at least here in Minnesota. Caveat: the Dems have a long habit of choosing poor candidates for Gov. here.

Posted by: bsimon1 | February 5, 2010 9:14 AM | Report abuse

We'll see about the TP movement. Perot's movement fizzled away, but did leave fiscal conservatism as a short-lived legacy. If these folks are truly concerned about growth in government and debt, they'll have something to say. Much of what I heard appears that this is a proxy movement for resentment of change (with Obama as a lead example) and power (Pennsylvania Avenue taking care of Wall Street).

Most interesting numberS of the day? Employment. 20,000 jobs were lost last month while the number of employed Americans grew by 541,000. I suspect I know which number is going to be touted by which side. Is the worm turning? There could be some real changes in the political climate if employment grows.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | February 5, 2010 9:09 AM | Report abuse

The Tea Party is typical of the emotion-driven grass roots movements that spring up in politics from time to time. They are disorganized, lack mainstream support and have trouble working together. They will die out soon enough.

http://www.political-buzz.com/

Posted by: parkerfl1 | February 5, 2010 8:14 AM | Report abuse

Andy, I attended a bachelor party last night for an old and dear friend who is a retired district judge. Not quite the hoot younger guys would have had - four men in our 60s, two in their late 50s, and one in his mid 30s [the son of the prospective groom]. A pediatrician, a SWA pilot, a software tech [the son], a government managerial employee, and three lawyers. Dinner in a corner of a restaurant. No cakes with strippers. Lots of funny and two terrifying reminisces about our shared hiking and skiing trips [not all of us had ever been on the same trip, so half of us were new to each story].

Some political talk. We shared a sense that the political climate was corrosive. Not anywhere near the worst ever, but quicker to turn, probably because of
the decline of newspapers and the rise of 24/7 manufactured and repeated "news". The ability to pick a channel that reinforces one's own anger and to shut out others is relatively new, too. Fear is feeding this anger, as it did in the McCarthy era and in '79-'82. The fear will be lessened if jobs pick up. Regardless of our political views, we all hoped for jobs to pick up. The COC and the NFIB and the unions all hope for jobs to pick up. If ever there was an opportunity in adversity, it is for these "conservative" and "liberal" groups to join forces in lobbying for job growth measures. They can push the two parties to get one thing right, and in concert. But then the pediatrician looked at the three lawyers and said that would be like us - cats and dogs, living together. :-)

Posted by: mark_in_austin | February 5, 2010 8:10 AM | Report abuse

No worries jr, this is a Republican Rising! column. As Chris has pointed out, if you want to see what the Democrats are up too, there is the rest of this paper, the NYT, your Seattle Times, my Oregonian. This is where we find out what the Rs are up to.

Anyway, it is good they they, the Republicans, have no leaders. Whether it is because of a dearth or because real leaders are no longer tolerated, the Republicans are all over the place, flag waving won't win back the Presidency.

Sure they will win back lots of seats in this or that paralyzed state or our ever more laughable Congress. The White House is where the Republican agenda has become so dangerous and I can't see anyone serious coming on to challenge Obama in '12, though '16 is going to be interesting.

Posted by: shrink2 | February 5, 2010 8:10 AM | Report abuse

Dems are making arangements for party supplies, for This sunday, while we let the tea-baggers have the headlines. After all, if your enemy is killing himself, dont interfere.

Posted by: elijah24 | February 5, 2010 8:03 AM | Report abuse

All five Fix stories this morning focus on Republicans. Are the Dems doing anything?!? Well, at least out here in Washington State, Senators Murray and Cantwell make almost no news nationally or locally . . .

Posted by: jrosco3 | February 5, 2010 7:59 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company