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Morning Fix: Virginia Governor's Race Viewer's Guide



State Sen. Creigh Deeds, former state Del. Brian Moran and former Democratic National Committee Chairman Terry McAuliffe face off for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in Virginia today. (Photos: Steve Helber/AP and Bill O'Leary/The Post)

Today's Virginia Democratic gubernatorial primary is the premiere contest of the first half of 2009 featuring a larger than life personality -- former Democratic National Committee chairman Terry McAuliffe -- and the likelihood of the nominee being part of an extremely competitive general election with national implications for 2010 and beyond. (Check out all coverage on The Post's Race to Richmond page.)

McAuliffe, taking advantage of the state's lack of limits on campaign contributions, used his national fundraising ties to vastly outpace both state Sen. Creigh Deeds and former state Del. Brian Moran -- showering the state with television ads and leaping into a polling lead.

But, Deeds, buoyed by the endorsement of the Washington Post and the sense that he was the honest broker amid the back and forth between Moran and McAuliffe, has surged in northern Virginia and statewide, and is now seen as the odds-on favorite in today's vote.

Here at the Fix, we aim to take our readers beyond the traditional analysis to give Fixistas the inside dope. So, below you'll find our viewer's guide for today's primary -- the trends, counties and communities to keep an eye on if you want to understand who is going to win and why.

Keep this "Morning Fix" handy later tonight as you watch the results roll in. Use it wisely and you'll be able to wow your friends and vanquish your enemies.

Norfolk City: For McAuliffe to win, he must perform well among black voters in the city of Norfolk as well as the broader Norfolk media market. The bigger portion of the electorate comes out of Norfolk, the better for McAuliffe who has spent considerable time and money organizing black voters in the city. If Deeds stays close to McAuliffe in Norfolk city, it will be very difficult for the Macker to win.

Momentum: In a primary where there are very few significant policy differences between the candidates, voters -- and state elected officials -- tend to side with the guy (or gal) who looks like they are going to win. Those familiar with the internal polling being conducted by the campaigns suggest that undecided voters have flocked to Deeds in recent days catapulting him into the lead. That same phenomenon is playing out among elected officials as state Sens. Linda "Toddy" Puller of northern Virginia and John Miller of Hampton Roads announced their endorsement of Deeds less than 24 hours before polls open in Virginia. Primaries tend to be self-fulfilling prophecies; the candidate who looks the winner usually is.

Fairfax County: One of the crown jewels of the northern Virginia vote, Fairfax should be a county solidly for Moran. But, how big -- if at all -- will Moran win it? Deeds has made huge strides in NOVA and if he stays within a single digit margin in Fairfax, it suggests Moran is tanking. In a fascinating twist given the relationship (or lack thereof) between the two men, McAuliffe needs Moran to stay strong in northern Virginia to have a chance at winning the race. The stronger Deeds is in NOVA, the worse off McAuliffe is statewide.

Electability: Deeds has used the electability argument throughout the race, noting that his profile -- more moderate than either McAuliffe or Moran -- is more in keeping with the successful strategies employed by Govs. Mark Warner and Tim Kaine. In the race's final days, McAuliffe has tried to turn Deeds's argument on its head by arguing that the state senator has already lost once to former state attorney general Bob McDonnell, the GOP nominee, and likely will lose again. Do voters buy McAuliffe's last-minute electability argument? Or Deeds's longer-term case for his chances in the fall? Or neither?

Fix Tuesday Picks: If it's Tuesday, that means a new episode of "Mouthpiece Theater." Stay tuned.

1. Newt(!) helps congressional Republicans raise $14.5 million.
2. SCOTUS rules on campaign contributions for elected judges.
3. Barney Frank sits for a chat with GQ's Lisa DePaulo.
4. Former Florida Senate candidate Dan Gelber (D) is now running for Attorney General.
5. The new iPhone debuts!

White House Rallies Support for Sotomayor: As Judge Sonia Sotomayor continues to make the rounds on Capitol Hill, the White House is continuing the rollout of public support for her nomination to the Supreme Court. Today at 11 a.m., Vice President Biden will headline the first full-fledged event aimed at building momentum for her confirmation -- a gathering where Sotomayor will be endorsed by a handful of national law enforcement groups. Although Sotomayor's confirmation appears to be on solid ground, the White House is taking no chances -- trying to win every day of the coverage of the nomination.

New York Senate Coup Could Aide House Dems: The coup that saw control of the New York state Senate handed from Democrats to Republicans on Monday could have a major impact on the special election ahead to replace Rep. John McHugh (R) in the 23rd district. Democrats' preferred candidate for the vacancy is state Sen. Darrel Aubertine who scored an upset in a 2008 special election in the western part of the 23rd. The concern -- prior to the coup -- was that an Aubertine House candidacy would force a special election that Democrats would likely lose, a defeat that would hand control of the state Senate back to Republicans. With that scenario off the table, Aubertine is free to pursue a House candidacy, which he was already considering before the power switch in Albany. A hummingbird flaps its wings halfway around the world. . . .

Trippi to Maloney: Joe Trippi, a Democratic consultant known his stewardship of former Vermont governor Howard Dean's presidential bid in 2004, has signed on to advise Rep. Carolyn Maloney on her challenge to appointed Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand in 2010. "I think if she runs, she will win and as someone who was born in Jamestown, N.Y., I would like to help make that happen," Trippi said of Maloney. Trippi knows something about underdog candidacies, having worked for Dean and then former Sen. John Edwards (N.C.) in the 2008 presidential race. Trippi is also advising former state Del. Brian Moran's (Va.) gubernatorial bid in Virginia. Maloney, who has held Upper East side 14th district since 1992, appears set to run against Gillibrand despite the fact that a number of her colleagues -- 11 to be exact -- have endorsed the appointed senator. Maloney's first major challenge is to prove she can stay competitive financially with Gillibrand, who has a well-earned reputation as a voracious fundraiser. Maloney ended March with $1.33 million in the bank; Gillibrand showed $2.2 million on hand in that same time period.

Follow Me: With the summer movie season upon us, three movie-themed Twitterers to follow: Le Doctor, MediaMajik, and Peter Travers.

Shuler Out . . .: Senate Democrats can't seem to find a top tier challenger to Sen. Richard Burr (R) in 2010 despite poll data that suggests the freshman senator is vulnerable. The latest candidate to remove his name from consideration is Rep. Heath Shuler (D) who told the Hendersonville Times-News: "I am not running for Senate. I have said that a thousand times, and I don't know why they keep coming up (with the idea)." Okeeeey. No need to overreact there, Heath. Shuler's no-go comes after state Attorney General Roy Cooper turned down the race despite cajoling from the White House. Expect recruitment to turn to Rep. Mike McIntyre, who has expressed interest in running, and maybe even Rep. Bobby Etheridge whose name is regularly in the mix for statewide office.

. . . Schakowsky Out: Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D) removed her name as a possible candidate for the Illinois Senate seat in 2010 citing her closeness to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) as enabling her to have a larger role in the lower chamber. With Schakowsky out, only state Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias is running on the Democratic side although Merchandise Mart head Chris Kennedy, the son of Robert and Ethel Kennedy, is preparing to run and has hired John Anzalone as his pollster and, according to Michael Sneed of the Sun-Times, AKPD as his media consultant. The field is essentially frozen until state Attorney General Lisa Madigan decides whether she is going to run for Senate or governor. (The current betting is governor.) Rep. Mark Kirk is Republicans' strongest candidate but seems to want to wait to see what the Democratic field looks like before deciding whether to run.

Say What?: "It defies economy practices and principles that tell ya you gotta quit digging that hole when you are in that financial hole." -- Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin critiques President Obama's economic approach during an interview with Fox News Channel's Sean Hannity.

By Chris Cillizza  |  June 9, 2009; 5:42 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  
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Next: Mouthpiece Theater: The Macker's Eternal Campaign, Palin's Economy and Grassley's Twitter

Comments

Jen is not the greatest of actresses.. I just think she is beautiful..

Posted by: newbeeboy | June 9, 2009 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Ok, it seems like Jon Gruden, not Keith Olbermann will be replacing Kornheiser in the booth. This I actually like.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 4:44 PM | Report abuse

"...and I'm a huge Jennifer Garner fan.. as well.... I actually knew some of her relatives, but was never fortunate enough to meet her in person...."

I saw her play Roxanne in a version of Cyrano de Bergerac. (Kevin Kline was Cyrano)

It was pretty bad.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 4:33 PM | Report abuse

You know, I'm not sure why they feel the need to have a third person in the booth. I'm too young to know anything about how Howard Cosell worked out, but with Dennis Miller and Tony Kornheiser, it just seemed like the two were straining to get some airtime. At least Kornheiser knows a lot about sports, but it seemed like his job was to scour the internet and look up obscure stats. I can't see what Olbermann brings to the table. At least he's a sports person as well.

I like the two person format. You have play-by-play, you have color, you have banter between the two. And you've got the game. I don't consider myself a traditionalist, but having a third person never enhanced my football experience.

If they really wanted a third person, I would suggest having a rotating guest spot that you could fill with a GM or former player or coach or something. Baseball does this all the time (albeit easier to do with a slower game). Maybe football can do something like it.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 4:29 PM | Report abuse

...and I'm a huge Jennifer Garner fan.. as well.... I actually knew some of her relatives, but was never fortunate enough to meet her in person....

Posted by: newbeeboy | June 9, 2009 4:18 PM | Report abuse

I was actually a huge Keith/Rachel fan during the primary season.. but, I either burned out or they got too far out on the limb..

..now, I'm going to start a campaign to have Keith disbarred from the Sunday Night Football pregame show.

Posted by: newbeeboy | June 9, 2009 4:16 PM | Report abuse

You're welcome. I'm not a big Affleck fan, but that was just great. It really captures Olbermann's over-the-top and contrived outrage over nothing. At least from what I've seen of Countdown, it wasn't that much of an exaggeration.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 4:11 PM | Report abuse

DDAWD...
thanks for the Affleck link.. I was howling.. he is awesome.. I was rocked by his impersonation.. brilliant.. he his better at Keith.. than.....Keith!!!!

Posted by: newbeeboy | June 9, 2009 3:56 PM | Report abuse

chrisfox8-
I don't disagree. While I said 'most likely scenario,' I only view at is the least unlikely scenario under which they could rebuild. Barring unforeseen external influences, the GOP won't stage a comeback until they have a compelling platform on which to run; perhaps 2014 or 2016.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 9, 2009 3:49 PM | Report abuse

@bsimon1: these are not the same sort of times that allowed the Bush enablers to broadcast streams of lies and distractions and have them become reality. The GOP is trying to get people to believe that the economy started going south when Obama took office, people are irritatingly remembering otherwise.

Obama's team has managed to get out the message that unemployment numbers will take longest of all to reverse, so the GOP message is falling flat. And it will take more than a year and a half for the GOP to spread the amnesia dust and have it work.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 3:11 PM | Report abuse

"How is the GOP going to make a comeback anytime soon?"

Most likely scenario: the economy stutters along for another year, giving them something to talk about in campaign 2010. The question is whether that is actually likely or a longshot. Personally I think its more of a longshot & they're shooting too soon. The stimulus spending is just entering the economy now, while the numbers (i.e. unemployment) people are watching are trailing indicators. I expect the economy to stabilize by the end of the year, which will bring public opinion more strongly to Obama & the Dems, while the GOP will look more foolish.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 9, 2009 1:40 PM | Report abuse

someone new, fresh, exciting -- and republican. LOL. good luck with that one.

==

No kidding.

Mitt Romney, centering his tie, talking about the magic of the marketplace. Mentioning Ronald Reagan a lot. Talking about business, business, business.

Can't you see the returns coming in now?

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 1:38 PM | Report abuse

drindl: may take a while, requiring as it does an implicit acknowledgement of the multiplicity of religions.

It'll be way behind teleprompter, birth certificate, Messiah, Socialist, and of course "you just wait!! You'll see!! Just wait!!"

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 1:36 PM | Report abuse

Et tu, Ari? Fleischer heaps ashes on the coals of newt's ambitions...

'Newt is a wonderful, fabulous dinner speaker, full of ideas and entertainment. But Newt is not going to be the next nominee of the Republican Party. We don’t know who the next nominee will be. I think it’s going to be somebody who we don’t know a lot about right now. Someone new, someone fresh, someone exciting. The Republican future can’t be back to the future. It has to be a new future. That’s the direction Republicans will go.

Fleischer also downplayed the emergence of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R), saying that although he was an early fan, “she has a long way to go to prove she’s presidential.” He added that she needs to focus on “substance” and has “a long distance to go before she rises to the level of being a serious presidential candidate.”

someone new, fresh, exciting -- and republican. LOL. good luck with that one.

Posted by: drindl | June 9, 2009 1:34 PM | Report abuse

Wonder when this meme will show up here?

Somewhere a troll is moving his lips while he read this...

"Today in his Washington Times column, right-wing commentator Frank Gaffney reviews President Obama’s speech at Cairo University last week and thinks he has stumbled onto something, that “there is mounting evidence that the president not only identifies with Muslims, but actually may still be one himself.” The evidence? “Mr. Obama referred four times in his speech to ‘the Holy Koran,’” he “established his firsthand knowledge of Islam,” and he uttered the phrase “peace be upon them” when referring to Moses, Jesus, and Mohammed. And according to Gaffney, “no believing Christian” would ever make such a statement because “for Christians, Jesus is the living and immortal Son of God.”


Posted by: drindl | June 9, 2009 1:29 PM | Report abuse

vbhoomes -- matthews is not rooting for anybody but himself. while republicans were in power, he drooled all over them. not that dems are, he drools on them. he drools a lot. i never watch him.

i agree with you, i don't watch the TV pundits either, i find them childish and absurdly out of touch.

Posted by: drindl | June 9, 2009 1:25 PM | Report abuse

"It defies economy practices"

no wonder the illiterates love her. she's as simple as they are.

Posted by: drindl | June 9, 2009 1:22 PM | Report abuse

Trust me, Fairlington, there's no love lost there. I think the Dems are spineless and lacking in conviction, I think Harry Reid is a disgrace, and I am not at all happy with the Democrats' performance, nor with Obama's muddied centrism.

But to say the GOP is on the verge of a comeback is simply unsupportable. There is nobody Out There® who has anything to bring them back. The can't win without the Base, and they can't appeal to anyone else while appealing to the Base. And if they are making any movement at all, it's further right. That won't win.

PS you don't have to mince words around "cock."

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 1:21 PM | Report abuse

"The whole "coverage" of the Tiller murder has pretty much eliminated all doubt in my mind as to which side controls the presses. I have yet to hear a single account as to how the large majority of his clientele involve Down syndrome fetuses and otherwise fetuses with no realistic shot at survival. None. The lack of context to this whole thing has pretty much let me know which side is controlling the discussion."

Absolutely. They very conveniently ignore the fact that NO 3rd term fetuses in this country are aborted unless something has gone horribly wrong, usually massive chromonsonal defects like trisomy or hydroencphelus, where the head is vastly enlarged and brian function destroyed from pressure. A geneticist's referall was necessary before the doctor would even see a patient.

But all this is conveniently left out of the picture, so the average person has no idea what the facts are. This is yet another failure of our anemic and lazy media.

But all this is conventl

Posted by: drindl | June 9, 2009 1:20 PM | Report abuse

"She should have known better."

We're talking about something pretty heinous here, so I just MUST give her the benefit of the doubt. It's a classic Dick Morris tactic to twist the words of the Clintons in the worst way and then justify this far fetched analysis by saying that the Clintons never make mistakes. It's pretty weaselly. I'd expect that from Dick Morris, but not from adults.

I'm not going to conclude someone advocated murder without a damn good reason. I just don't have one for Clinton. It was poorly chosen words.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 1:17 PM | Report abuse

@chrisfox - Careful about being too, umm, cocky. I recall having heard something about a permanent majority after the 2004 election. Didn't even last as long as the 1000 year Reich.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | June 9, 2009 1:15 PM | Report abuse

As for Clinton, I didn't like how she ran her campaign. I didn't like the RFK comment, but it was pretty obvious it was just a way of saying anything can happen.

==

She should have known better.

One thing I think really killed her was her speaking style; aside from the fact that what she was saying sounded so calculatedly middle-of-the-road, she did this thing with her voice as she was approaching what was clearly a planned applause line, rising and louder, rising and louder, until the money-shot when her voice turned into a shrill and incisive squeak.

"you know what they say ... as goes Ohio, sO GOES THE NAAAAATION!!!!!"

I had my hands over my ears.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 1:05 PM | Report abuse

125 characters and therefore twitworthy:

"It defies economy practices and principles that tell ya you gotta quit digging that hole when you are in that financial hole."

Posted by: mattintx | June 9, 2009 1:03 PM | Report abuse

How is the GOP going to make a comeback anytime soon? There remains the same problem: the Base. It's not possible to appeal to the base and appeal to other voters, it just isn't. The base is too extreme and too much driven by negative emotions.

McCain lurched back and forth between trying to appeal to centrist voters and appeal to the base. With each lurch he lost support from one or the other. Romney will do the same, and Romney is conspicuous on his fair-weather positions. McCain was bad enough, voting against his own anti-torture bill, but at least McCain had SOME convictions, they just happened to be universally bad ones.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 12:59 PM | Report abuse

"I thought his remarks were spot-on. But that was the only time I've heard him speak, it was online, I don't watch television, so I don't know how he is the rest of the time.

Clinton's remark was hard to take any other way, to even touch the topic of assassination was remarkably tone-deaf, and she made it sound like assassins are a legitimate political group who deserve their chance to weigh in. "

I don't watch much Olbermann either.

As for Clinton, I didn't like how she ran her campaign. I didn't like the RFK comment, but it was pretty obvious it was just a way of saying anything can happen. All those people claiming she was hoping for Obama to be shot or she was inviting for Obama to be shot are just ridiculous.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 12:58 PM | Report abuse

I'm thinking that Brian will eventually make a bid for his brother's seat. I don't think Jim will stay there forever.

Deeds will win and frankly I don't care what happents to Macker. He and Jim Gilmore should go off on an island somewhere and slap each other silly.

Oh, the issue that may lead to a schism in the Democratic Party will be Gay Marriage. This will split the party in DC and may force a second formal party to form. That split may reverberate through the party nationally in time. It will be interesting to see where Obama comes down on this.

Posted by: michaelbindner | June 9, 2009 12:57 PM | Report abuse

After Olbermann's rant on Clinton's RFK comment, I just couldn't watch him anymore. The RFK comment wasn't a good one to make, but Olbermann's rant was WAY over the top.

==

I thought his remarks were spot-on. But that was the only time I've heard him speak, it was online, I don't watch television, so I don't know how he is the rest of the time.

Clinton's remark was hard to take any other way, to even touch the topic of assassination was remarkably tone-deaf, and she made it sound like assassins are a legitimate political group who deserve their chance to weigh in.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 12:55 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 12:50 PM | Report abuse

vb: That's Northeast, Far West, MidAtlantic and Midwest Party. After 2004 election, everyone was talking about a 50-50 nation. After 2006, the Democrats were clearly already both emergent and even the Majority. Last time I checked, that's two elections.

With gaffe machines like Huckabee, Palin, Limbaugh and Gingrich at the top of your heep, how exactly do you expect this to change? I did not mention Romney, but you can simply tell he is changing his position because his lips are moving. He will always say the right thing, even if he said something else previously.

The Republicans may not be coming back. It is more likely that there will be a schism is the Democratic Party when it grows to big in the legislature. The only question is will some people defect to the Greens or claim to be the "real Democrats". Look at DC's situation with two very different camps under the same banner and you will see what I mean (East of the River, West of the Park and the middle - whose allegiance to one or the other determines who is in charge).

Posted by: michaelbindner | June 9, 2009 12:50 PM | Report abuse

After Olbermann's rant on Clinton's RFK comment, I just couldn't watch him anymore. The RFK comment wasn't a good one to make, but Olbermann's rant was WAY over the top.

Incidentally, Ben Affleck's impression of Olbermann has been one of the best things I've seen on Saturday Night Live in a while.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 12:47 PM | Report abuse

Maddow is a huge dork. If you like that, then she's the one for you.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 12:44 PM | Report abuse

Drindl, granted Chris Mathews had it in for Hillary, but not because he was rooting for republicans, he was and is in love with Obama. Frankly I can barely watch many of these political shows on MSNBC and Fox because I find most of the anchors are extremely obnoxious and irratating. This includes that silly Glen Beck, Bully, O'Reilly, Mathews and olberman. I'm okay with the Ed show and Rachael Maddox.

Posted by: vbhoomes | June 9, 2009 12:41 PM | Report abuse

Macker should not be making an electability argument after being involved in the 2000 Gore Campaign, 2004 Kerry Campaign and 2008 Clinton Campaign. Each loss can be traced to his focus on "battleground states". Brining such a focus to the general election will turn Virginia Red - and if it doesn't would have disasterous consequences for governance.

As for New York - the Coup happened after the session had gaveled to a close. The Coup was illegal and will not be reflected in the Journal of proceedings - although it will bring forward one heck of fight if the 2 shady Democrats who assisted it are walking around free when the legislature next meets (or even all of the Republicans, as I understand there was a bit of corruption during GOP rule).

Posted by: michaelbindner | June 9, 2009 12:40 PM | Report abuse

You simply smoking that funny weed if you think dems can hold onto power for more than another election or two.

==

And you're sucking the ol' glass dick if you think the GOP has a shot anytime soon. Nineteen percent, dude, Nine. Teen. Per. Cent.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 12:35 PM | Report abuse

And the major demographic which you ignored was a PEW poll that discovered for every liberal in this country there was two conservatives.

==

Uh, yeah, and a hell of a lot of those "conservatives" voted for Obama.

You nurture that hope, and you keep on hoping Palin runs for President.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 12:33 PM | Report abuse

The whole "coverage" of the Tiller murder has pretty much eliminated all doubt in my mind as to which side controls the presses. I have yet to hear a single account as to how the large majority of his clientele involve Down syndrome fetuses and otherwise fetuses with no realistic shot at survival. None. The lack of context to this whole thing has pretty much let me know which side is controlling the discussion.

The right wing has done a good job at playing the refs. I think the left wing needs to do the same. And not by attacking FOX News. Everyone knows their bias. They need to attack CNN for covering Rush Limbaugh speeches or for failing to provide context to the Tiller assassination.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 12:28 PM | Report abuse

ChrisFox, one election only makes you the majority party until 2010. I could have said you guys were just a northeast party after 2002 elections when we cleaned your clocks. Notice how conservatives are gaining hugh ground in Europe, no party is destined to have majority rule forever, the american public will sour on dems(Pelosi is already below Cheney in polls)just as they soured on republicans. And the major demographic which you ignored was a PEW poll that discovered for every liberal in this country there was two conservatives. You simply smoking that funny weed if you think dems can hold onto power for more than another election or two.

Posted by: vbhoomes | June 9, 2009 12:28 PM | Report abuse

"The November 2009 elections will sweep in Republicans in the both NJ and Va. Obama will be a drag on whoever the dem nominee is for Va. Everything is now falling in place for a big GOP victory in 2010. The idea the Republican party is a regional party and no longer a national party is sheer delusion and fantasy on the part of liberal activists. Chris Mathews you will have plenty of Republicans to go after next year."

You'd better hope so. It seems like the only places Democrats are in trouble are in Illinois, Nevada, Connecticut, Colorado, and Pennsylvania. Only in Colorado was McCain even within ten points of Obama (he lost by 9 points)

Democrats have pickup chances in solid blue states (Ohio and New Hampshire) as well as in the two swingiest states (Missouri and North Carolina)

Republicans are most certainly a regional party. They won't necessarily be forever, but they are as they stand. They are going to have to evolve outside of their comfort zone. The Democrats got flexible and this allowed them to expand. Republicans need to do the same. Ideological purity is death in politics since large groups of human beings are very seldom ideologically homogeneous.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 9, 2009 12:20 PM | Report abuse

"Chris Mathews you will have plenty of Republicans to go after next year."

Chris Matthews's has for years been a democrat basher. he insisted for years that "everybody" likes George W. Bush, except "the real whack jobs"? (Bush's approval ratings at the time were in the 30s.)

He compared Bush to Atticus Finch?

he said Bush "glimmers" with "sunny nobility"? he gushed over Bush's "mission accomplished" stunt, revealing what could only be described as a crush on the president?

he derided Democratic critics of Bush's handling of Iraq as "carpers and complainers"?

and he ridiculed Barack Obama for ordering orange juice in a diner and said Obama's bowling was insufficiently "macho" he called Obama an elitist who had trouble connecting with "regular people" -- by which he meant "white people"?

and he called Hillary Clinton a "She Devil" and said she was "witchy" he said of Clinton "I hate her. I hate her. All that she stands for"

he spent two years absolutely trashing Al Gore, helping to hand the presidency to George W. Bush? he turned over his airwaves to Gennifer Flowers, allowing her to accuse President Clinton of murder

But that was when he was just speaking to "regular" people, telling it like it is. Now that he's trashing Republicans he's being a partisan.

Get over it.

Posted by: drindl | June 9, 2009 12:15 PM | Report abuse

vbhoomes: by any honest demographic analysis, the GOP is the party of the south. They have lost critical support in every other region of the country, and have lost in the south as well, but they had farther to fall there.

You say the blue/red map on election night, and with the racist cant of GOP discourse since then, particularly regarding the Sotomayor nomination, they have lost even more.

Newsflash: Virginia is part of the south. Duh.

So you hang on to little things like gubernatorial races in southern states and you tell yourself "we're NOT a regional party, we're NOT! We're NOT!" but the tide's gonna come in anyway.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 12:10 PM | Report abuse

Okay I will chrisfox, come Nov 2010, make sure you are here, so you can eat crow.

Posted by: vbhoomes | June 9, 2009 12:01 PM | Report abuse

The idea the Republican party is a regional party and no longer a national party is sheer delusion and fantasy on the part of liberal activists.

==

Yeah you keep telling yourself that, it'll help you get to sleep.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 9, 2009 11:56 AM | Report abuse

The November 2009 elections will sweep in Republicans in the both NJ and Va. Obama will be a drag on whoever the dem nominee is for Va. Everything is now falling in place for a big GOP victory in 2010. The idea the Republican party is a regional party and no longer a national party is sheer delusion and fantasy on the part of liberal activists. Chris Mathews you will have plenty of Republicans to go after next year.

Posted by: vbhoomes | June 9, 2009 10:58 AM | Report abuse

I am saving this gem to my computer so I can read it tomorrow after Brian Moran wins. Deeds was pumped by the Post but that has persuaded few voters -- and I've knocked on a lot of doors and made a lot of calls.

No one likes Terry. At all. It's really a Creigh vs. Brian race. All Creigh has is the Post endorsement, and it wasn't that great a list of reasons. The Post endorsed Harris Miller against Jim Webb too.

Brian was asked my Mark Warner to get into politics in the first place. There's a big difference between casting yourself as "like Warner" (Deeds) and being someone Warner likes (Moran).

Posted by: xcrunner771 | June 9, 2009 10:33 AM | Report abuse

Prediction time:

Deeds: 42%
Mac: 30%
Moran: 25%

Posted by: reality_chuck | June 9, 2009 10:33 AM | Report abuse

McAuliffe should sell used cars -- he has the perfect style.

Posted by: reality_chuck | June 9, 2009 10:30 AM | Report abuse

McAuliffe is a hack, with his only claim to fame that he shilled for the Clintons, for years, and helped drive Hillary's candidacy into the ground. He reminds me of JFK's Harvard buddy that they tried to run for Governor of Mass. in 70s, as a payoff for years of loyal goferism. (I think his name was McDonald.) Virginia doesn't need McAuliffe and we don't need him continuing on the national stage.

Posted by: GerryMc97 | June 9, 2009 9:18 AM | Report abuse

If Terry loses, where does he go from here? DisneyWorld?

Posted by: newbeeboy | June 9, 2009 9:10 AM | Report abuse

The kind of people who vote in primaries know that the great Commonwealth of Virginia owes Terry McAuliffe nothing. It was nice that he got some endorsements there at the end, but they were also from people who Virginia owes nothing.

All politics IS local.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | June 9, 2009 8:54 AM | Report abuse

"And, finally, I looked around our world and I thought, you know, we are in just so many deep holes that everybody had better grab a shovel and start digging out."

Hillary Clinton, on "This Week With George Stephanopoulos," June 7

Posted by: meow1 | June 9, 2009 8:26 AM | Report abuse

Deeds is going to win because he is going to sweep the western part of the State. That and the fact that McAuliffe is the definition of a parachute candidate. He has lived in Virginia for 17 years, but by no means should he consider himself a Virginian. And in Virginia that matters.

Posted by: AndyR3 | June 9, 2009 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Come on Virginia! You've given us eight Presidents from Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe to Wilson. Quite a record isn't it. Now give the Democrats a candidate for Governor who can unite the state,move it forward and who has a great track record as a moderate. This "rag" endorsed the right candidate, Deeds is good for VA.

Go "Smack A Macker"!

Posted by: NotBubba | June 9, 2009 6:47 AM | Report abuse

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