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Morning Fix: Jetting to the Left Coast



The Fix's destination! Robert Holmes -- California Travel & Tourism Commission

The Fix is headed off to the wine country for a few days so today's Morning Fix will be abbreviated and posting for the remainder of the day -- and weekend -- will be light.

Friday Line junkies, never fear. We will have a Line later today.

Friday Fix Picks:

1. Obama pitches health care in Wisconsin.
2. The Iranian election.
3. Mike Murphy on the coming GOP "Ice Age."
4. A primary challenger for Kirsten Gillibrand not named Carolyn Maloney.
5. To buy the new iPhone or not?

Ryan Steps Forward: Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, touted as a rising star within the GOP ranks, led the assault against President Obama's health care plan on Thursday -- insisting that the president's rhetoric and the reality of his plan do not match up. "When you take a look at what the president is saying and what he is proposing they are two very different things," said Ryan, who hosted a conference call with reporters organized by the Republican National Committee to counter the president's town hall in the Badger State. Ryan insisted that Obama was setting up a "false choice" between the status quo and the administration's plan; the Wisconsin Republican also seized on Obama's support for a so-called "public option" in health care insisting that such a solution would lead to the government "rationing" care. Expect Ryan to play a lead role in the fight against Obama's health care plan this fall as he is one of the young, articulate faces currently active in the Republican Party.

Kerry Collects Cash For Franken: Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry (D) has sent an e-mail appeal asking for cash to help Minnesota Democrat Al Franken "fight back against the money of the Republican party and win his legal fight." Kerry added that "Republicans need to accept the fact that we will have 60 Democratic Senators." Franken leads former Sen. Norm Coleman by 312 votes but Coleman has pursued a series of legal challenges that has brought the election before the Minnesota Supreme Court. There's no timetable for a ruling by that court on Coleman's challenge but the cementing conventional wisdom is that the former Republican will not take the case to the federal level if he loses in the state's court.

Click It!: Kudos to the Republican Party of Pennsylvania for an ingenious Web site aimed at pressuring party switching Sen. Arlen Specter (D) to return contributions given to him when he was still a GOPer. The site, called "Give It Back Arlen," allows past donors to send an email to the Specter campaign asking for their money back. "If you are like thousands of other Americans who were conned into supporting Arlen Specter, exercise your First Amendment rights and ask Arlen to give your money back," reads the site.

Schweich Is Out: Washington University law professor Thomas Schweich dropped his consideration of a GOP run for the Missouri open Senate seat on Thursday and urged Republicans to unite behind the candidacy of Rep. Roy Blunt. Establishment Republicans in Washington and Missouri have worked to get behind Blunt's candidacy but former state treasurer Sarah Steelman has formed an exploratory committee and appears to be moving toward a bid. Democrats have cleared the field for Secretary of State Robin Carnahan who has to be considered the frontrunner at the moment.

Budgetball: The Fix is a sucker for new sports -- especially ones with "Budget" in the title. So, we were intrigued by the Budgetball tournament going on this Sunday on the National Mall. What the heck is Budgetball? "Budgetball is a team sport similar to Ultimate Frisbee and designed to build awareness, especially among young people, about the nation's growing financial challenges and the trade-offs involved in solving them," according to a release from the Peter G. Peterson Foundation, which is sponsoring the tournament. Let's hope Budgetball is better than "BASEsketball."

Follow Me: A few more pop music Twitterers to check out -- Lefsetz, Aquadrunkard, and Ilovethissong.

Say What?: "I don't want to prejudge the conclusion of a result that hasn't come to pass just yet." -- White House Deputy Press Secretary Bill Burton channeling his boss White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs.

By Chris Cillizza  |  June 12, 2009; 5:41 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  
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Next: Mouthpiece Theater: The Moustache Edition

Comments

"does not the congressman pronounce his name "bay-ner"?"

I believe so. Which sounds suspiciously French to me. Someone should check his papers.

==

"an inquiry will place the blame where it belongs"
-- the Minister of the Interior or Inferior (Clockwork Orange, 1975)

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 12, 2009 4:35 PM | Report abuse

"does not the congressman pronounce his name "bay-ner"?"

I believe so. Which sounds suspiciously French to me. Someone should check his papers.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 4:00 PM | Report abuse

"bsimon! at 2:28P has the post of the day.

But it git me thinking - does not the congressman pronounce his name "bay-ner"?"

It's kind of like how the seventh planet is pronounced UR-a-nus instead of ur-A-nus. Just a contrived pronunciation change to curtail the childish hilarity.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 12, 2009 3:58 PM | Report abuse

bsimon! at 2:28P has the post of the day.

But it git me thinking - does not the congressman pronounce his name "bay-ner"?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | June 12, 2009 3:19 PM | Report abuse

kwoods2, I think you're misunderstanding what Reichert said. Here's a longer excerpt from the Big Question piece you link to by Bob von Sternberg:


" City elections director Cindy Reichert gave a brief rundown of how the ballots disappeared from Ward 3 Precinct 1. “We were quite busy, there was a lot going on,” she noted. Her bottom line: “We determined definitively the ballots were missing” — a contention that’s been dismissed by Coleman’s team. Reichert recommended that the board accept the number of votes in the precinct counted on Election Night: 2,028 (which is actually 132 votes higher than recounted because of what she called an insigificant math error).

Attorney General Lori Swanson said that based on case law, the board can accept the number counted on Election Night “if you believe those [votes] were cast and counted on Election Night.”

After several board members questioned Reichert about her calculations about the vote totals, she stated simply, “I am convinced those are correct.”

Board member Eric Magnuson, the Supreme Court’s Chief Justice, moved that the board certify the Election Night count of 2,028 votes and the board adopted the motion unanimously. Magnuson noted that court precedents have noted that a challenge to that decision would rely on firm evidence and “if you don’t have the ballots, you don’t have evidence. I believe the office here acted in the best interest of the public.” "

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 2:57 PM | Report abuse

good point.

Posted by: drindl | June 12, 2009 2:35 PM | Report abuse

bsimon1,
Your comment on Phantom ballots was posted right at the moment I was posting to drindl, and so now let me elaborate. You are incorrect that the machine tally was 133. There is a discrepancy with the machine tally and the non-existent or Phantom ballots which supports the debate that Cindy Reichert was correct:

In an article in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, according to Minneapolis elections director Cindy Reichert, she stated she is "confident" that on election night an error occurred when election judges, at the precinct, mistakenly ran ballots with write-in candidates through a counting machine twice.

The 2008 Minnesota law states that a physical manual hand count is required to determine voter intent whenever the election results between the candidates fall within a specified error threshold.

The law envisions a painstaking physical manual hand count is to be taken over any results from the automated machines.

If the machine tally was to be relied on, Coleman won.

The very purpose of a hand count is to count actual ballots to determine the voters' intent.

It is physically impossible to gain the voter intent of a phantom ballot that does not exist, and, therefore, including them was in violation to MN state law causing the hand count tally to be diluted with illegal ballots thus destroying the value and credibility of the physical hand count. The physical hand count will be soiled until the phantom ballots are rejected and removed.

Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Magnuson, who sat on the Election Canvassing Board noted court precedents have noted that a challenge to that decision would rely on firm evidence and “if you don’t have the ballots, you don’t have evidence.'”

"He also noted that the issue “no doubt” is headed for court."

http://politicalblogs.startribune.com/bigquestionblog/?p=1246

Posted by: kwoods2 | June 12, 2009 2:33 PM | Report abuse

"When did 'took it in the shorts' become acceptable language for an elected representative [ I mean PUBLICLY]."

With a name like Boehner, he's held to a different (lower) standard.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 2:28 PM | Report abuse

When did 'took it in the shorts' become acceptable language for an elected representative [ I mean PUBLICLY]. It seems rather crude for TV. I know I'm older, but have things changed that much?


"In an interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-OH) pinned the blame for his party’s current failures on the Bush presidency:

“We’re digging ourselves out of a deep hole,” he admitted. “We took it in the shorts with Bush-Cheney, the Iraq War, and by sacrificing fiscal responsibility to hold power.”

Boehner has only to blame to himself. He voted to authorize use of military force against Iraq, and voted against a House-approved Iraq withdrawal in 2007. He also voted for the 2001 and 2003 Bush tax cuts, which were largely responsible for turning our nation’s surplus into a massive deficit. As Boehner himself said in 2006, “I think that Republicans ought to stand up and support George W. Bush for the job that he’s done.”

Posted by: drindl | June 12, 2009 2:17 PM | Report abuse

"To slander our great American sport of BASEketball is tantamount to knocking a hot dog out of the hand of a child holding a sparkler on the fourth of July while a bald eagle rests on his shoulder."

That movie might have been decent if Parker and Stone got real actors to play their parts. Those two were just terrible.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 12, 2009 2:13 PM | Report abuse

Whoops. I apparently used a Phantom 'n' when I wrote "Phatom Ballots".

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 2:08 PM | Report abuse

drindl wrote: "What are Phantom ballots?"

drindl,
Phantom ballots are just that - phantom ballots or non-existing ballots. 133 Phantom ballots have diluted the true count which Phantom ballots are nonexistent and cannot obviously be counted in a physical manual hand count in accordance to the 2008 Minnesota law and where 4,900 ballots similarly situated to others already counted have not been allowed.

Posted by: kwoods2 | June 12, 2009 2:06 PM | Report abuse

"What are Phantom ballots?"

Phatom Ballots are ballots that went missing during the recount process. In one district (in Minneapolis, if I'm not mistaken) one envelope of 133 ballots was misplaced between election night & the recount. The canvassing board chose to use the machine tally to count those votes, even though the physical ballots could not be located. The canvassing board ruled this was an acceptable alternative because the machine tally properly matched the other physical ballots that were hand counted - i.e. the disparity between the physical ballots and the optical scanner used to count the ballots on election night was 133, so the board decided using the machine's count was preferable to not counting the misplaced ballots. The 3 judge panel that reviewed the canvassing board's decisions unanimously upheld this decision.

kwoods2 appears to believe that both the canvassing board and 3 judge panel ruled incorrectly on that issue. I'm not a legal expert so can't discuss the nuance of election law is it relates to this particular issue. Perhaps kwoods2 can offer some insight there, with appropriate links & supporting evidence.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 2:05 PM | Report abuse

Once again the Fix has gone too far.

To slander our great American sport of BASEketball is tantamount to knocking a hot dog out of the hand of a child holding a sparkler on the fourth of July while a bald eagle rests on his shoulder.

For shame. Beg Coop and Sir Swish for forgiveness lest you befall a terrible PSYCHE OUT.

Posted by: Calispiral | June 12, 2009 2:00 PM | Report abuse

What are Phantom ballots? Is that a brand name? Or do we have Rogue Capitalization Syndrome going on here?

Posted by: drindl | June 12, 2009 1:55 PM | Report abuse

bsimon1 wrote: "Nothing to lose but more money. I imagine writing that $95,000 check to Sen-elect Franken stung a bit. Of course, former Sen Coleman isn't spending his money, he's spending donors' money. I think that means the decision on whether or not to try further appeals rests with those who write the checks. The former Senator is more a bystander at this point."

As Professor Richard Hasen, Loyola Law School in Los Angeles states:

"Democracy is expensive and disruptive."

Cheating the system, like the three (3) judge panel and the Election Canvassing Board has done, costs much much more than 95,000. It costs Minnesota its dignity, its respect, a damaged election process for the future, a legal train wreck, and Minnesotans not being able to trust their election process not to mention the voters and Coleman's civil rights being abridged.

I think a little bit of time and 95,000 is cheap, for the voters and those funding this process, when you look at the harm that is cost if the failures or the wrongful decisions, of the ECC and the three judge panel, are not reversed.

It is unlikely the Minnesota Supreme Court will do anything other than rubber stamp the present violations of law inclusive of counting Phantom ballots in Franken's favor.

Posted by: kwoods2 | June 12, 2009 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Maybe he's not a racist but this constant public drumbeat of hatred for obama is really not helpful right now. When we already know that having a black man as president has unhinged some people and we are in the midst of a deep financial downturn that will further derange them, why provoke people like this? It's one thing to legitimately criticize the president, another to accuse him of thinking he's a messiah.

Posted by: drindl | June 12, 2009 1:07 PM | Report abuse

I don't think Krauthammer is a racist, I think he's more an Israel apologist than anything else. His relationship to responsible journalism is congruent with a streetwalker's to romance. I remember when he wrote for The New Republic as a center-right columnist, then the whole Bush phenomenon happened and he, along with Fred Barnes, sold out completely.

Once a year or so Krauthammer does a really good column, very insightful and clear, but this one is so rare that it's just too toxic to read the ugly, nasty, doctrinaire drivel he writes the rest of the time. He really has swallowed the line and the sinker along with the hook.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 12, 2009 12:45 PM | Report abuse

Mike Murphy's article in the list above is a good read, and offers good advice to the GOP, but there's no chance they'll take it. We'll have a few more presidential cycles of Reagan nostalgia and denial as identification shrinks even further. The GOP remains intent on Kremlinesque ideological purges that reduce their numbers and leave them isolated in the rural south and Utah.

Considering what a lousy job they do with power, this is a good thing.

Posted by: chrisfox8 | June 12, 2009 12:41 PM | Report abuse

"While the rapid repartee is fun, you know that there are, both, politicians' dissembling for shameless advantage and a place for civil discourse among "real" people. From chrisfox8-thinman-jakeD we get the perpetual back and forth that you three usually [and DDAWD always] avoid[s].

Do we think CC's blog is a place for civil discourse, or not? Drindl believes that the right wing media voices call for violence and that encourages bad actors. I cannot add anything to that because I do not listen to media beyond PBS/NPR. Bhoomes thinks tying an 88 year old anti=semite who wanted to bomb "FOX" and the "Weekly Standard" to conservatism is unfair. That sounds reasonable to me."


I'll have a little fun with the back and forth when its amusing to me. Kind of when KOZ posted his statistical analysis. Or what I posted earlier today about the 9/11 references. I'm not about to get into it as much as jaked and chrisfox. Now jaked would easily be the most bigoted person I've ever "met" both in real life and on the internet, but chrisfox can be really stupid himself.

I think sites like these serve a few functions. For guys like drindl to play Keith Olbermann, for guys like vbhoomes, to play Bill O' Reilly, and for guys like me to play a somewhat partisan political scientist who has a clue what he's talking about.

The other is that I think the internet is cathartic. There are a lot of people who use this to get the anger off their chests. I know that in my day to day life I don't find many people to talk politics with. I'm sure these angry "Obama is a secret Muslim socialist" people don't either. So they get on the internet and clog these boards with their ranting. We were ground zero for that when Drudge linked here for some Nancy Pelosi column.

So between all that, we can certainly try to work in some intelligent conversation. I know I'll respond to anything that looks interesting.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 12, 2009 12:08 PM | Report abuse

"Krauthammer is not ignorant of history. He is quite well educated and that's what makes what he does doubly disgusting. "

I'm just referring to what he wrote, not what he knows.

And just because a racist agrees with him doesn't make what he said racist. I'm sure many racists would celebrate if they knew blacks get more heart attacks than whites, but that doesn't make epidemiologists closet Klan members.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 12, 2009 11:53 AM | Report abuse

Krauthammer is not ignorant of history. He is quite well educated and that's what makes what he does doubly disgusting.

if you were a racist, wouldn't you say he agreed with you?

Posted by: drindl | June 12, 2009 11:43 AM | Report abuse

The Fix is a sucker all right -- suckered into promoting Peter Peterson -- a wall street billionaire who wants to get rid of all social programs:

"Mr. Peterson has never been shy about using his Wall Street wealth to try to cut Social Security and Medicare, and he recently stepped up his efforts. Last year he spent $1 billion to endow the Peter G. Peterson Foundation, which seems to have destroying these programs at the top of its agenda. (Mr. Peterson also has a think tank named after him, the Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics.)

Peter G. Peterson does not believe in the need for a social safety net and considers spending on broad reaching social programs to be an example of fiscal irresponsibility by government. Being a Wall Street made billionaire, Peter G. Peterson is in a luxurious position of likely never needing to access a government backed social program, so no wonder he is against paying for it.

Peter G. Peterson was the Commerce Secretary under Richard Nixon. In case you need a refresher, ethics was not Nixon's strong suit, but the fiscal policies of that disgraced president still stand today as an example of responsible government spending in the eyes of the Peter G. Peterson Foundation."

Sucker.

Posted by: drindl | June 12, 2009 11:32 AM | Report abuse

kwoods2 writes
"I wouldn't bet on it. Coleman has nothing to lose and everything to gain by taking his case to the federal courts"


Nothing to lose but more money. I imagine writing that $95,000 check to Sen-elect Franken stung a bit. Of course, former Sen Coleman isn't spending his money, he's spending donors' money. I think that means the decision on whether or not to try further appeals rests with those who write the checks. The former Senator is more a bystander at this point.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 11:29 AM | Report abuse

"Not that Obama considers himself divine. (He sees himself as merely messianic, or, at worst, apostolic.) But he does position himself as hovering above mere mortals, mere country, to gaze benignly upon the darkling plain beneath him where ignorant armies clash by night, blind to the common humanity that only he can see. Traveling the world, he brings the gospel of understanding and godly forbearance. We have all sinned against each other. We must now look beyond that and walk together to the sunny uplands of comity and understanding. He shall guide you."

Translation: He an uppity n*gger. He thinks he's better than you. He thinks he's above your God and relgion."

Whoa, what Krauthammer said was stupid and ignorant of history, but that doesn't follow that he was being racist.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 12, 2009 11:22 AM | Report abuse

"But antisemitism was not von Brunn's only hobby horse. His note specifically cited the belief that his guns were about to be confiscated as his immediate trigger."

Ironically, as a convicted felon, Von Brunn's guns already had been "confiscated."

Posted by: VTDuffman | June 12, 2009 11:20 AM | Report abuse

"Republicans need to accept the fact that we will have 60 Democratic Senators." John Kerry

Kerry needs to accept the fact that we will have 59 Democratic Senators.

Posted by: kwoods2 | June 12, 2009 11:17 AM | Report abuse

mark_in_austin,

As usual, an excellent point.

I totally agree that antisemitism exists on both the left and the right. The DC sniper provides and example of racial extremism on the left that can be traced to the rhetoric of Farrakhan, nominally on the left.

But antisemitism was not von Brunn's only hobby horse. His note specifically cited the belief that his guns were about to be confiscated as his immediate trigger. And while no major broadcast entity or political party is loudly and consistently propagating Farrakhan's conspiracy theories, a major political party and several major media outlets are engaged daily in propagating utterly unfounded conspiracy theories such as that your guns are about to be confiscated.

There are unstable people who no one wants to encourage. The daily use of wild and irresponsible theories to stir up your base will have side effects that you may not desire, that do not strictly represent your cause, but that you should be able to foresee. I do not think it is wrong to point this out.

Posted by: nodebris | June 12, 2009 11:16 AM | Report abuse

There's no timetable for a ruling by that court on Coleman's challenge but the cementing conventional wisdom is that the former Republican will not take the case to the federal level if he loses in the state's court.Chris Cillizza

I wouldn't bet on it. Coleman has nothing to lose and everything to gain by taking his case to the federal courts

Posted by: kwoods2 | June 12, 2009 11:14 AM | Report abuse

"As a jew, you are well aware there are plenty of anti-semetics in the left wing of your party."

Actually not, bhoomes. The reform congregation I belong to is mostly democratic voter. What many jews feel too is that they are being co-opted by evangelists, who want them in Israel as part of their beleif system regarding the second coming, when all the jews will either convert to Christianity or be killed. This doesn't thrill most of us.

You are mistaking what i say in any case. The Southern Strategy has always relied on flirting with racists. It gives aid and comfort to racists and please don't pretend that doesn't happen. The point is about inflammatory rhetoric and frightening people. Why did the guy in Pittsburgh shoot four cops? He told everyone he knew that he was afraid Obama was going totake his guns, like he heard on the radio... on Fox.. in mainstream newspaper.

Then this other guy murders a doctor, a doctor called out and maligned 28 times on the air by Bill OReilly. Then this guy, the museum shooter, was a regular poster on Stormfront, a popular white supremacist site which has many posters who call themselves conservatives. Does that make all conservative racists? Of course not. But they are far too tolenant of hate speech. And MSM pundits, who know better, are among the most hateful. Look at the despicable Krauthammer this morning:

"When President Obama returned from his first European trip, I observed that while over there he had been "acting the philosopher-king who hovers above the fray mediating" between America and the world. Now that Obama has returned from his "Muslim world" pilgrimage, even the left agrees. "Obama's standing above the country, above -- above the world. He's sort of God," Newsweek's Evan Thomas said to a concurring Chris Matthews, reflecting on Obama's lofty perception of himself as the great transcender.

Not that Obama considers himself divine. (He sees himself as merely messianic, or, at worst, apostolic.) But he does position himself as hovering above mere mortals, mere country, to gaze benignly upon the darkling plain beneath him where ignorant armies clash by night, blind to the common humanity that only he can see. Traveling the world, he brings the gospel of understanding and godly forbearance. We have all sinned against each other. We must now look beyond that and walk together to the sunny uplands of comity and understanding. He shall guide you."

Translation: He an uppity n*gger. He thinks he's better than you. He thinks he's above your God and relgion.

It's purposely designed to fan the flames of hatred and bigotry, to make ignorant people angry and make them want to rise up and do something. Many rightwing bloggers and talk radio hots are quite open about wanting a 'revolution' - a violent one. And it certainly seems to me that while Krauthmmer is more veiled and coded, that's what he's aiming for too.

Posted by: drindl | June 12, 2009 11:11 AM | Report abuse

In the interest of "civil discourse" however, I offer this:

When the DHS report was released a while ago, Republicans including Sens. Mcconnell and Boehner made the calculated choice to get outraged and indignant that the report included mentions of threats from "right Wing Extremists," to the point of demanding apologies from Sec. Napolitano.

These republican leaders made the choice to align themselves with the subjects of he report because they thought they could score some political points off of it.

What happened was that several attacks followed that fit exactly into the mold that the DHS report described. Now we are witnessing a scramble to completely separate the party from the attackers.

At best, the behavior of GOP leaders in this whole fiasco can be described as intellectually dishonest.

Posted by: VTDuffman | June 12, 2009 11:08 AM | Report abuse

Coleman, good for you for your appeal of this wrongful setback which can easily be transformed into a win.

Posted by: kwoods2 | June 12, 2009 11:06 AM | Report abuse

"Do we think CC's blog is a place for civil discourse, or not?"

Could it be? Sure.

Is it? No.

vbhoomes is just as guilty as the rest of them for the cheap shots and deserves to be mocked when he calls for "civil discourse" during times that reflect negatively on his political party of choice.

He's pretty much the king of "what's good for me is not for thee" around here.

Posted by: VTDuffman | June 12, 2009 11:02 AM | Report abuse

The Fix should investigate the theft of water by a non native fish and the environmentalists in California. No water for the farmers, not much food for the east coast people.
Downsizeca.org

Posted by: yokohlman | June 12, 2009 11:00 AM | Report abuse

"Excellent retort, VTDuffman."

Yes, but vbhoomes is still correct.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 10:55 AM | Report abuse

NoDebris, DDAWD, and VTDuffman -

While the rapid repartee is fun, you know that there are, both, politicians' dissembling for shameless advantage and a place for civil discourse among "real" people. From chrisfox8-thinman-jakeD we get the perpetual back and forth that you three usually [and DDAWD always] avoid[s].

Do we think CC's blog is a place for civil discourse, or not? Drindl believes that the right wing media voices call for violence and that encourages bad actors. I cannot add anything to that because I do not listen to media beyond PBS/NPR. Bhoomes thinks tying an 88 year old anti=semite who wanted to bomb "FOX" and the "Weekly Standard" to conservatism is unfair. That sounds reasonable to me.

But there is a lot I could learn here from a real discussion of that, with links, that I cannot learn from the talking head level of cheap shot, however amusing. Thanx, guys.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | June 12, 2009 10:49 AM | Report abuse

Excellent retort, VTDuffman.

Posted by: nodebris | June 12, 2009 10:37 AM | Report abuse

"" An effort to take political advantage of a tradegy only adds to uncivil discourse."

I agree. I 9/11 applaud Republicans 9/11 for the 9/11 fact that 9/11 they have never 9/11 taken political advantage 9/11 of a tragedy...9/11"

I was actually starting to get used to being told that I'm trying to give aid and comfort to the terrorists.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 12, 2009 10:35 AM | Report abuse

" An effort to take political advantage of a tradegy only adds to uncivil discourse."

I agree. I 9/11 applaud Republicans 9/11 for the 9/11 fact that 9/11 they have never 9/11 taken political advantage 9/11 of a tragedy...9/11

Posted by: VTDuffman | June 12, 2009 10:17 AM | Report abuse

I think the 'reform' candidate is a bit of a stretch since all the candidates are pretty hard-line, but at least he wasn't once a terrorist like the Ahmadinejad. I do agree though that if the other guy wins then it will give Europe, Russia, and America a window to negotiate an agreement with Iran that will hopefully ratchet down the tension between the different groups.

Not to mention the benefit to the people of Iran who have suffered through an extended recession in a country with the third largest oil reserves and the second largest reserves fo natural gas in the world.

Posted by: AndyR3 | June 12, 2009 9:31 AM | Report abuse

"It will be interesting to see how this plays out."

Yup. From the sounds of it, even in Iran "its the economy, stupid" is true. Whether the mullahs see it that way is unclear.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 9:21 AM | Report abuse

The Fix tags
"Mike Murphy on the coming GOP "Ice Age.""

Mr Murphy says nothing that hasn't been written in the comments here over the last year. Murphy's writing is more clumsy too - an ark metaphor in the lede, the ice age in paragraph two and loaded dice in the third. Yet Time found it fit to print. Wow.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 9:17 AM | Report abuse

newbeeboy gets post of the day.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | June 12, 2009 9:15 AM | Report abuse

I hope you are right BSIMON, if the Reform candidate wins, there could be a chance of improved relations. It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

Posted by: vbhoomes | June 12, 2009 9:12 AM | Report abuse

vbhoomes writes
"I wish we had international poll watchers because I suspect the mullahs will decide who the winner is, not the people."

Where's Jimmy Carter when you need him?


Flippancy aside, it seems that while the Ahmadinejad-controlled agency that counts the votes has some ability to manipulate the outcome, it is possible they might not have enough power to overcome a landslide, which might be possible. Naive? Overly Optimistic? Perhaps. According to NPR this AM Ahmadinejad has alienated some of the religious leaders - including close allys of the Ayatollah. So my amateurish guess is that there's a reasonable chance Ahmadinejad will lose.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 12, 2009 9:07 AM | Report abuse

Hey Mark, I share your suspicion about the Iranian election. I think there is a danger Americans may believe this a true democracy instead what it really is a Theocracy where Mullahs have the last say, not the President of Iran. I wish we had international poll watchers because I suspect the mullahs will decide who the winner is, not the people.

Posted by: vbhoomes | June 12, 2009 8:56 AM | Report abuse

You should be able to see the Russian River from the back porch.

Posted by: newbeeboy | June 12, 2009 8:56 AM | Report abuse

CC, Let me second everything Andy said. If you are with the family and get to the Calistoga end of the Valley, take the cable car [ski lift] up to the Sterling Vineyards on the cliff overlooking a great stretch of the Valley.

I am learning that it is more difficult to get the babies to say "Nonno" then it was to get them to say "Dada". I hope you are "working" Charlie on this!
-----------------------------------------------------------
I am hopeful they do not "FIX" the Iranian election, and that ImADinnerJacket fades from view.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | June 12, 2009 8:46 AM | Report abuse

Drindl trying to tie mainstream conservatism to the extremist nut, Von Brunn is beneath you. An effort to take political advantage of a tradegy only adds to uncivil discourse. Neo Nazis are not conservatives, they are haters outside the established standards of deceny. As a jew, you are well aware there are plenty of anti-semetics in the left wing of your party.

Posted by: vbhoomes | June 12, 2009 8:40 AM | Report abuse

HOLOCAUST MUSEUM SHOOTER ENABLED BY FED-BACKED 'GESTAPO USA' EXTRAJUDICIAL TARGETING VIGILANTE NETWORK?


Holy cow, I am agreeing with (paid?) blog-mobber drindl.

Is this his "Casablanca Moment"? "The start of a beautiful friendship" -- ??


***


Fact is, a federal "multi-agency coordinated action" program appears to provide funding, organizational structure and, the evidence indicates, direction, for what amounts to an "American Gestapo"...

... an extrajudicial targeting and punishment "matrix" that has drafted hundreds of thousands of citizen volunteer vigilantes to stalk, harass, terrorize and yes, TORTURE, many many thousands of unjustly "targeted" American citizens and their families...

...using covertly implanted GPS tracking devices and classified microwave radiation "directed energy weapons" -- which have been proliferated to local law enforcement nationwide by government agencies that include the Department of Justice.

This "multi-agency coordinated action" appears to be overseen by secretive security forces close to the seat of executive power (but apparently under the radar of POTUS and his closest aides).

My task here is to issue a WAKE-UP CALL to POTUS, VPOTUS, AG Holder and Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano, David Axelrod and Rahm Emanuel.

If their aides are reading this, please forward the following link to their immediate attention:

http://nowpublic.com/world/gestapo-usa-govt-funded-vigilante-network-terrorizes-america

OR (if link is corrupted / disabled):

http://NowPublic.com/scrivener

***
A NOTE TO SEC. NAPOLITANO: My postings here appear to be subject to near- real-time prior restraint and outright censorship that I believe emanates from the Homeland Security- supervised "fusion center" based in Newtown, Bucks County PA.

Secretary Napolitano, I believe your charges are allowing the imposition of unconstitutional prior restraint and censorship on political speech and telecommunications in America. Please do something about this. Thank you.

Posted by: scrivener50 | June 12, 2009 8:19 AM | Report abuse

While Mr. Cillizas and Milbank clown around about Jeremish Wright, further ratcheting up the hatemongering, groups like this are proliferating:

- Hate groups have intensified their rhetoric in recent months.

They also say that many white supremacist groups have been energized by a sour economy and the election of a black U.S. president.

"The traffic [on online hate discussion groups] has really been high, and there are more people who feel their voice isn't being represented," said Randy Blazak, associate professor at Portland State University in Oregon and director of the Hate Crime Research Network.

"I've heard white people say whites are being fired from their jobs because they're white, and that there's going to be a new left-wing regime that will restrict people's rights," Blazak said.

The 88-year-old Maryland man charged in Wednesday's fatal shooting at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington has a long history of ties to white supremacist groups and anti-Semitic views, according to an FBI criminal complaint in the case.

A Web site attributed to the suspect, James von Brunn, proclaims itself "a new, hard-hitting expose of the Jew conspiracy to destroy the white gene-pool."

Authorities have not mentioned a motive in the shooting.

The number of active hate groups in the United States rose from 602 in 2000 to 926 in 2008 -- an increase of 54 percent -- according to the Alabama-based Southern Poverty Law Center."

Words have consequences -- and all the racist hate -- coming frm perople like Krauthammer in this paper-- is bound to raise the level of the rhetoric and the violence.

Funny thing is, they know it. And they don't care. And I can honestly beleive at this point in time that they want things to go terribly wrong, that they want people to be killed, to serve their own incredibly selfish corporate agenda.

Posted by: drindl | June 12, 2009 7:43 AM | Report abuse

Have fun in California CC!
I think any political junkie has their eyes on Iran today. I heard that the lines were hours long and that they have extended the voting for two hours and may extend it two more hours after that. Here's to hoping that the Iranians get rid of the wack-job that's running their country right now.

Posted by: AndyR3 | June 12, 2009 7:39 AM | Report abuse

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