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Alabama voters shake up status quo (again)

1. Alabama voters added their names to a growing list of those who are mad as hell at establishment politicians and not going to take it anymore.

Party switching Rep. Parker Griffith was stunned by Madison County Commissioner Mo Brooks in the northern Alabama 5th district while Rep. Artur Davis, long touted as a rising star nationally in the Democratic party, was soundly defeated in a gubernatorial primary by state Agriculture Commissioner Ron Sparks.

Griffith's defeat was the more surprising of the two as most Republican strategists had cast the worst case scenario as the incumbent receiving just under 50 percent of the vote and being forced into a July 13 runoff.

That Griffith could barely muster one in three GOP primary votes with the full support of the national party behind him is a stern reminder that voters are fed up with politicians acting like, well, politicians. That Griffith's loss came two weeks to the day after party switching Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter (D) lost his race to Rep. Joe Sestak (D) means that any Member of Congress who was even considering a party switch won't be doing so any time soon.

Griffith is the second House Member to lose his bid for renomination; West Virginia Rep. Alan Mollohan (D) was the first. On the Senate side, Specter and Sen. Bob Bennett (R-Utah) have already been defeated in their runs for re-election while Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.) faces a tough runoff race next Tuesday. (The last time this many Senators lost in primary fights was way back in 1980.)

Davis' loss was more complicated but no less telling about the dangers of sticking to political conventional wisdom in an election as volatile as this one.

He made a decision early in the campaign to run away from President Barack Obama's agenda -- voting, most notably, against the health care legislation -- under the (mistaken) belief that it was the only way for him to remain viable in a general election in conservative minded Alabama.

But, that strategic approach -- coupled with Davis' politically inexplicable decision to openly antagonize unelected black leaders in the state -- undermined his political base in the African American community and foreclosed any chance of him being the state's first black governor.

2. Doña Ana County District Attorney Susana Martinez routed former state party chairman Allen Weh in the New Mexico Republican gubernatorial primary, a win that sets up a battle with Lt. Gov. Diane Denish (D) in the fall.

With 27 of the state's 33 counties reporting, Martinez led Weh in all but two: Roosevelt County in the eastern part of the state, and Cibola County in the west. Martinez's widest margins were in Hidalgo and Sierra Counties in the southwest, as well as in northwestern Rio Arriba; she broke 60 percent in all three.

The Republican Governors Association played a major role in Martinez's victory -- steering more than half of Martinez's total fundraising receipts to her campaign (she raised $720,000 between May 4 and May 25), and playing a key role in orchestrating the endorsement of Martinez by former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin (R) last month.

Together with the GOP's lieutenant governor nominee, John Sanchez, Martinez sits atop the first all-Latino gubernatorial ticket in New Mexico history.

Democrats wasted little time in seeking to slow Martinez's momentum. "Susana Martinez is all sizzle, no steak," said state Democratic party chairman Javier Gonzales in a statement late Tuesday night.

3. California Attorney General Jerry Brown (D) is out with his first ad of the 2010 gubernatorial campaign -- a pre-emptive strike at his two GOP opponents in advance of the state's June 8 primary.

The Brown ad notes that former eBay CEO Meg Whitman and state Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner have spent $110 million on the race and run "100,000 negative ads." (Um, is that a scientific calculation?)

The ad features audio clips of Whitman and Poizner bickering over their primary and notes the state's financial woes. "Enough already!" flashes on the screen, next to a picture of Brown. "Let's get California working again!"

The message is simple: Whitman and Poizner represent politics as usual while Brown equals change. That may be a somewhat complicated argument for Brown to make given that he is running for an office that he first held more than three decades ago.

The former governor caught a break in his primary when several serious contenders -- including Sen. Dianne Feinstein, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom and Rep. Loretta Sanchez either opted out or ran and then dropped out.

With Whitman -- and her billions -- very likely to emerge as the Republican nominee next week, California political observers are predicting an extremely competitive general election.

4. Pennsylvania Rep. Joe Sestak (D) holds a seven-point edge on former Rep. Pat Toomey (R) in a new poll in the Keystone State Senate race commissioned by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

Sestak took 47 percent to 40 percent for Toomey in the survey, which was conducted by Fred Yang of Garin Hart Yang Research from May 21-23.

Despite taking a pounding -- particularly in the Philadelphia area -- in ads from Sen. Arlen Specter (D) in the primary, Sestak's favorable scores are still respectable with 34 percent seeing him in a favorable light as compared to 18 percent who regarded him unfavorably. Toomey, who faced no primary, has similar ratings to Sestak with 30 percent viewing him favorably and 19 percent regarding him unfavorably.

Those numbers suggest that roughly half of voters haven't formed an opinion of any sort about either man -- meaning that the campaign each runs will matter in the final outcome.

The DSCC poll is the second survey since Sestak's primary upset of Specter that gives the Democrat an edge. A survey done by Research 2000 for the liberal Daily Kos blog put Sestak at 43 percent to 40 percent for Toomey.

(Both polls should be taken with a measure of caution as one was paid for by the Democratic Senatorial campaign arm and the other funded by a liberal blog.)

Sestak almost certainly is benefiting from the flood of positive press he received following his win on May 18. It remains to be seen whether that momentum can be maintained through the fall.

5. With the Arkansas Senate runoff entering its final six days, Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D) and Lt. Gov. Bill Halter (D) are up with new television ads aiming to close the deal with Razorback State voters.

Halter is dual-tracking at the end -- running a positive spot calling Halter "the only voice for change," and a negative one that features a senior citizen criticizing Lincoln's position on Medicaid and Social Security.

Lincoln's final ad is a direct to-camera appeal in which she acknowledges the forces that have led to her vulnerability; "I know you're angry at Washington," she says. "Believe me; I heard you on May 18th."

Lincoln is also running a radio spot in which former President Bill Clinton touts her chairmanship of the Senate Agriculture Committee, her efforts on Wall Street reform and her vote for the federal health care overhaul.

"She hasn't changed just because they call her 'Senator,' no matter what those nasty TV ads say," Clinton says in the 60-second spot.

The ad follows on a visit by Clinton to the state last Friday in which he delivered a blistering speech accusing labor unions of trying to make Lincoln the "poster child" for what happens to legislators who don't vote their way.

Both Lincoln and Halter are criss-crossing the state in advance of next Tuesday's vote. Halter was in southwest Arkansas yesterday, and is heading to the north-central part of the state today. Lincoln will be spending the bulk of her time in eastern, central and northwest Arkansas, according to her campaign.

With Felicia Sonmez and Aaron Blake

By Chris Cillizza  |  June 2, 2010; 6:00 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Party switcher Parker Griffith, Rep. Artur Davis lose in Alabama primaries
Next: GOP seeks to re-create Joe Sestak job drama in Colorado

Comments

Thanks for correcting the Gonzales quote.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | June 2, 2010 11:32 PM | Report abuse

All of the above shows the danger of the Tea Party. Any elected official will have some votes that upset one group or another. Gather together everyone who is discontented: The result is that almost no incumbent can get re-elected. That also does not mean the discontented get anything like what they want. The new office holder will got through the same cycle. It is impossible to please all the people all the time. The end result of this process is amateurism running the government, with special interests all the more in control.

Posted by: DrMarkJohnHunter | June 2, 2010 5:31 PM | Report abuse

Raving is right. Sometimes these folks name themselves so aptly.

Posted by: drindl | June 2, 2010 3:49 PM

Now I'm going to LOL in advance of one of them telling ME I have no life. Laughing already.

Posted by: drindl

the stopped clock phenom.

Posted by: bumblingberry | June 2, 2010 5:09 PM | Report abuse

I think the media needs to step back from over interpreting every election. All that can be drawn from the Griffith and Specter elections is that it is hard for a party-switcher to reclaim the trust of voters in this cycle.
I don't really see these cases as supporting the theory of an anti-incumbant feeling in the country.

Posted by: AlaninMissoula | June 2, 2010 5:05 PM | Report abuse

"Give Arlen credit. At least he was honest about his party switch. Parker suddenly discovered principles, the principle one being saving his own job.

There has been one party switcher (in office) who earned my respect. He resigned as a Democrat and ran for election as a Republican. A Texas senator, I think.

Jake in 3D out

Posted by: JakeD3 | June 2, 2010 11:12 AM | Report abuse

"

Phil Gramm did it, but he wasn't yet a Senator when he resigned to run under a different party. In 1965, Rep. Albert Watson (SC-2) did the saem thing after Dems stripped him of his committee assignments for backing Goldwater in 1964.

Posted by: joeyjoejoe | June 2, 2010 4:54 PM | Report abuse

""Remember when California worked? Let's go back to the good old days - we need to put Jerry Brown back in office!" "

If he can get Linda Ronstadt to come out of retirement and run around with him again, he can really play on nostalgia. They can campaign to "Yesterday once more" (Yeah, I know, that was Karen carpenter,. but nostalgia dims everybody's memories.)

Posted by: ceflynline | June 2, 2010 4:45 PM | Report abuse

" I think Sestak has the tougher sale to make & will have to define Toomey, before Toomey can define himself. Posted by: bsimon1 "

Considering that Toomey has already defined himself as exactly an irrational ideologue who wants to talk about shrinking government but not say where or how, Sestak's job might not be as hard as all that.

Posted by: ceflynline | June 2, 2010 4:41 PM | Report abuse

"That Griffith could barely muster one in three GOP primary votes with the full support of the national party behind him is a stern reminder that voters are fed up with politicians acting like, well, politicians"

Or perhaps that White Alabama Republicans don't like Black Alabama Democrats, even when they switch parties to preserve their seats.

The cognoscenti who paid attention called this denouement way back when Griffith bailed on Pelosi.

He got what he paid for. Loyalty is a funny thing.

Posted by: ceflynline | June 2, 2010 4:34 PM | Report abuse

"Let this be a clear warning to all career politicians. Go quietly into the dark night, as we rave against the dying of the light of freedom

Posted by: crazycharleyd "


Raving is right. Sometimes these folks name themselves so aptly.

Posted by: drindl | June 2, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Yes, folks in Alabama are mad as hell and will not take it anymore.

Let this be a clear warning to all career politicians. Go quietly into the dark night, as we rave against the dying of the light of freedom.

Americans are revolting against the sickening mess you politicians have made of our country.

Voters will forgive nothing.

They want you to join the ranks of the unemployed, something all elected officials (and most bureaucrats) in Washington D. C. richly deserve.

Posted by: crazycharleyd | June 2, 2010 3:33 PM | Report abuse

uh oh, someone forgot to take his message board Valtrex

Posted by: DDAWD | June 2, 2010 2:34 PM | Report abuse

Wow, Margaret. I wonder if bumblingzouk and 37 are now living out of the same basement, because zouk is posting as frantically as 37 lately--maybe 37 is giving him some of his crystal meth. Like about 200 times since yesterday -- they apparently have their computers in front of their potty chairs, so they never have to take a break!

Now I'm going to LOL in advance of one of them telling ME I have no life. Laughing already.

Posted by: drindl | June 2, 2010 2:23 PM | Report abuse

:-)

Posted by: margaretmeyers | June 2, 2010 1:54 PM | Report abuse


The country deserves an INDEPENDENT PROSECUTOR TO INVESTIGATE:


1) Whether the Obama people, through a Union Official, made an offer to Blago with the intent to get Valerie Jarrett the appointment to the US Senate.

2) The Sestak affair, whether the Obama perople, through another third party, Bill Clinton, made an offer to Sestak to illegally influence the PA primary.

3) The Romanoff affair - whether an offer was made there to influence that election.


IT APPEARS THAT THERE MAY BE A CRIMINAL ENTERPRISE HERE - REPEATEDLY BREAKING THE SAME LAWS.

THAT WOULD MAKE OBAMA GUILT OF RACKETEERING.


ALL THESE CRIMES ARE IMPEACHABLE OFFENSES.


The American people need to clean house -


When MMS wasn't cleaned out properly, and oil rig safety was allowed to continue to be lax, look what happened to the Gulf of Mexico.

We have to clean house with Obama - NOW.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | June 2, 2010 1:46 PM | Report abuse


The country deserves an INDEPENDENT PROSECUTOR TO INVESTIGATE


1) Whether the Obama people, through a Union Official, made an offer to Blago with the intent to get Valerie Jarrett the appointment to the US Senate.

2) The Sestak affair, whether the Obama perople, through another third party, Bill Clinton, made an offer to Sestak to illegally influence the PA primary.

3) The Romanoff affair - whether an offer was made there to influence that election.


IT APPEARS THAT THERE MAY BE A CRIMINAL ENTERPRISE HERE - REPEATEDLY BREAKING THE SAME LAWS.

THAT WOULD MAKE OBAMA GUILT OF RACKETEERING.


ALL THESE CRIMES ARE IMPEACHABLE OFFENSES.


The American people need to clean house -


When MMS wasn't cleaned out properly, and oil rig safety was allowed to continue to be lax, look what happened to the Gulf of Mexico.

We have to clean house with Obama - NOW.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | June 2, 2010 1:43 PM | Report abuse

Margaret


I guess you are the type of person - that when people are trying to get something done, all you do is annoy and slow down progress.

You really are a drag on society.

Would you just stop it with you anger, your lashing out at innocent people?

I think you may need to be on medication - or even committed to a mental hospital.

The people around you are surely in danger.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | June 2, 2010 1:34 PM | Report abuse

Obama blaming BP is not going to help Obama much - OBAMA WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SAFETY STANDARDS - THE INSPECTIONS - AND THE ATMOSPHERE AT THE MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE.


Obama can not accept responsibility.


Is Holder going to prosecute Obama over his failure to make sure proper safety protocols were followed? How about the lack of proper environmental preparedness reports ???


The PEOPLE OF THE GULF REGION DESERVE A GOVERNMENT WHICH FUNCTIONS PROPERLY.


THE SAME LAW THAT THEY ARE PROSECUTING BLAGO - FRAUD FROM FAILURE TO PROVIDE PROPER GOVERNMENT SERVICES - THAT IS WHAT OBAMA IS GUILTY OF.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | June 2, 2010 1:28 PM | Report abuse

Margaret


Take a hike You have no idea what you are talking about

Your postings reveal real stupidity


AND yet you feel like you have something to say about everyone else.

Keep your ridiculous insults to yourself

AND IF YOU ARE ON A GOVERNMENT COMPUTER, YOU ARE BREAKING THE LAW - IDIOT.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | June 2, 2010 1:26 PM | Report abuse

Striking a partisan tone, President Barack Obama said Wednesday he is working to rebuild the economy without much help from Republicans, saying they have mostly "sat on the sidelines and shouted from the bleachers."
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>...
well at least they should take up golf or basketball or something if they want to dither.

I get the sense that berry sees himself making that half court shot at the buzzer with the entire world acting as bleacher creatures; you are either in his bleachers or you are on the other side of the court.

Truly a picture of arrogance and out of touch megalomania.

What is most amusing is that he only needs ONE Repub in the Senate and the House is a rubber stamp, and he still can't cope. so instead he blames, blames, blames. I think most people are catching on now. the pitiful press conferences, all two of them, are not helping.

Posted by: bumblingberry | June 2, 2010 1:19 PM | Report abuse

Those aren't the guys who are all the same person!

cannula popped up after a long silent spell. I can only figure there was no connectivity wherever he was incarcerated... errr, staying.

37th is odd because the tag is used by more than one poster for sure. That or 37th has multiple personalities.

Brigade is older than the average poster, just my feeling.

bumblingberry is what I say to the kids at night to keep them in bed. "buuummmmbling berrrrry." He's like something out of Stephen King!

Posted by: margaretmeyers | June 2, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

The message the White House seems to be sending this week is, "When all else fails, send in the lawyers and prosecute."

This raised the strange, if not laughable spectacle of Obama, who was also a lawyer, initiating a criminal investigation or civil action against the company that Obama has conceded is the only one who has the expertise to deal with the crisis and hopefully, end it.

This is taking command of the crisis? This is taking responsibility?

But this was just the beginning of the White House's Keystone Kops response. On Monday -- brace yourself -- the administration said it was no longer sharing the daily briefing podium with BP.

I feel much better now, don't you?

Posted by: bumblingberry | June 2, 2010 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Chris - actually perhaps the biggest story coming out of New Mexico last night was Ben Lujan's (father of Ben Ray Lujan, freshmen congressmen) near death experience at the hands of an untested, not very credible candidate who had no platform to speak of. Lujan is one of the longest serving and most powerful politicians in the state; he hasn't even had a challenger in more than a decade, and he barely eaked out a win of around 70 votes. THAT is anti-incumbent sentiment.

Posted by: russoruss | June 2, 2010 12:38 PM | Report abuse

Congressmen Jason Altmire and Tim Murphy have previous engagements. Sen. Bob Casey Jr. and Rep. Mike Doyle are out of town on anniversary trips with their wives. Allegheny County Executive Dan Onorato will be campaigning in Philadelphia.When President Obama and Sen. Arlen Specter land at Pittsburgh International Airport today, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl will receive them by himself.The rest of the region's top elected officials declined White House invitations to attend Obama's speech at Carnegie Mellon University this afternoon, their offices said.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Obungler's in town. run for the hills if you want to keep your job!

Posted by: bumblingberry | June 2, 2010 12:25 PM | Report abuse

no cannula, no 37th, no brigade and no bumblingberry

Posted by: margaretmeyers |


According to the dingbat drivl, that is all one person. they are either all here or none are.

consider the other side - an entire array of simpleton Obamabots all thinking the exact same socialist approach to failure and incompetence with the same old disproven dimwitted big government methods. Can you hit them over the head with the idiot stick enough to get them to think differently. Seemingly not.

Economy down - a commission
Oil spill - a brain trust
Foreign failure - a board
health care - death panel
energy policy - a summit

Nowhere do we ever find ACTION. the only action they take is to raise taxes, increase bureaucracy and government corruption and run for reelection based on trumped up lies. the ditherer in chief is AWOL, probably golfing or Bball.

Posted by: bumblingberry | June 2, 2010 12:19 PM | Report abuse

The Moonbat is batty as ever. He tries to extract a message out of this fairly neutral appraisal of the political scene. That's his "business as usual". CB

Posted by: chrisbrown12 | June 2, 2010 11:48 AM | Report abuse

The Moonbat is batty as ever. He tries to extract a message out of this fairly neutral appraisal of the political scene. That's his "business as usual". CB

Posted by: chrisbrown12 | June 2, 2010 11:47 AM | Report abuse

In re: "All steak no sizzle" (or the reverse, which makes more sense), I do not believe that any candidate endorsed by Sarah Palin could claim to be either. Not substantial, and not (intellectually, at least) exciting. Rather, I would expect such a candidate to present as a semi-coherent, marginally articulate mixture of thinly veiled prejudice, belief in superstitious folklore, and blind devotion to that which is least admirable in American consumer culture. No steak, no sizzle, just a big gassy bowl of moose chili with all the cartilage still in it.

Posted by: bokonon13 | June 2, 2010 11:28 AM | Report abuse

Give Arlen credit. At least he was honest about his party switch. Parker suddenly discovered principles, the principle one being saving his own job.

There has been one party switcher (in office) who earned my respect. He resigned as a Democrat and ran for election as a Republican. A Texas senator, I think.

Jake in 3D out

Posted by: JakeD3 | June 2, 2010 11:12 AM | Report abuse

Just an example of "take out the trash". That particular sentiment has no political party and works on both sides. Certainly looks like members of both major parties are not interested in the old "business as usual" baloney which has been going on for far too long. Neither side trusts any of the career politicians these days.

How refreshing to see the electorate wake up and start to do some actual thinking for a (REAL) "change"!

Posted by: OregonStorm | June 2, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

no cannula, no 37th, no brigade and no bumblingberry

Posted by: margaretmeyers | June 2, 2010 10:49 AM | Report abuse

The Moonbat is batty as ever. He tries to extract a message out of this fairly neutral appraisal of the political scene. That's his "business as usual". CB

Posted by: chrisbrown12 | June 2, 2010 10:42 AM | Report abuse

The blog is mostly intelligent and interesting this morning. What changed?

Oh I see it now. No drivl. No Ped. No broadway.

Obamabots and free spending RINOs beware. The voters are done with you. Same lesson different day.

Posted by: Moonbat | June 2, 2010 10:35 AM | Report abuse

why no mention of Shelby beating the TeaPrty candidate? But I guess that runs conter productive to the subject of this blog. Funny how CC mentions to take the poll results with a grain of salt, cause they were done by lib companies, when we never see that warning with Club for Growth polls, I guess they're written in stone...

Posted by: katem1 | June 2, 2010 10:31 AM | Report abuse

Definitely not a good year to be an incumbent in Alabama. State Senator Steve French, one of the top Republicans there, got destroyed by challenger Slade Blackwell in his primary. George Wallace and Troy King lost big too. That's not a good sign for AL Senate Democrats, where a couple of incumbents have tough challengers. That, combined with the fact that there are two open Dem State Senate seats that lean GOP, means that Republicans could get a majority of 18 seats for the first time since Reconstruction there.

Posted by: joeyjoejoe | June 2, 2010 9:55 AM | Report abuse

Parker Griffith sealed his political future with his very first vote in Congress - voting for San Fran Nan as Speaker of the House. He was "rewarded" with cuts in his District's bread and butter - NASA and Missile Defense.

In a state that is forgiving of party switchers (i.e. Fob James, Richard Shelby, Bradley Byrne) and in a "moderate" district where no GOP congressman in a century, the moderate Democrat turned Republican was shown the door without a runoff. Griffith also shot himself in the foot by not doing the groundwork regarding his party switch with local GOP and conservative organizations. He had already become a creature of Washington, thinking if Boehner was good with his switch, the 5th District would be.

For the number crunchers out there, the GOP candidates garnered 70,000 total votes and the Dem candidates combined for 45,000 votes. The general election is Mo Brooks' for the taking against Dem Steve Raby, a Washington insider and lobbiest trying for his first elective office. He will have a very hard sell in North Alabama defending against the claim that his first vote in congress will be for Nancy Pelosi as speaker. It killed Griffith, and Raby will not overcome that charge in the general election. This run is really to increase his name recognition for a future office.

There is a sea change in Congress coming this November, thanks to Obama, Reid, and Pelosi's radical leftist agenda.

PS - Race did not pay a role in Artur Davis' run for governor as he could not manage to sweep Alabama's "Black Belt" counties. Davis' best results were in the GOP stronghold counties of Shelby and Mobile. He had to know he was toast when he could not even win minority bellweather Macon county, home of Tuskeegee University. Youtube videos of Artur Davis fighting against Bush admin audits of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac before the housing bubble burst clearly became an anchor to his campaign hopes as well. Dems garnered 319,000 primary votes, GOP received 355,000 votes statewide which indicates that the governor's race was the main driver for primary voters yesterday, and is not a hopeful sign for Davis' future prospects in the state.

Posted by: Redwarning | June 2, 2010 9:42 AM | Report abuse

I really hope America shakes the very foundation of politics as usual and sends a very clear message to Washington, CLEAN UP YOUR ACT and SHOW SOME ACCOUNTABILITY!

Posted by: jblow50 | June 2, 2010 9:39 AM | Report abuse

I wonder if this bipartisan anti-establishment sentiment that seems to be pervasive might call for a re-interpretation of the generic ballot. The conventional wisdom is that the President's party needs to maintain a sizable advantage in the GB to simply maintain the status quo. This is working against the Dems since now they only have a small advantage in the GB. Could it be that the CW interpretation isn't correct? Or perhaps the GB is meaningless this year.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 2, 2010 9:28 AM | Report abuse

DDAWD, thank god for small favors I guess.

Posted by: AndyR3 | June 2, 2010 9:27 AM | Report abuse

You have to wonder if Obama's people deliberately made only a half-effort to show support to Specter by offering a non-paid job to Sestak through a second party (Bill Clinton). Sestak was projected as a stronger candidate but Obama and the Democrats owed Specter for his party-changing.

Posted by: sam38 | June 2, 2010 9:26 AM | Report abuse

Margaret, lets not forget the Club For Growth was all kinds of anti-oil regulation pre-BP.

Posted by: AndyR3 | June 2, 2010 9:22 AM | Report abuse

Looks like thugs and criminals who don't give a rip about Alabama won.

http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2010/06/mcmillan_grace_in_runoff_for_g.html

I guess we can lay this great ad to rest.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jU7fhIO7DG0

Posted by: DDAWD | June 2, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

bsimon1, most definitely Sestak needs to get out there fast and let people know what vision of government Toomey and Club for Growth have. They are in favor of everything that has put this country in the ditch. It is their vision of free markets, weak Federal government and an unregulated work place that has resulted in the stock market crash, Madoff-type fraud and dead miners.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | June 2, 2010 8:52 AM | Report abuse

"The message is simple: Whitman and Poizner represent politics as usual while Brown equals change. That may be a somewhat complicated argument for Brown to make given that he is running for an office that he first held more than three decades ago."

Brown benefits from the soft glow of nostalgia. "Remember when California worked? Let's go back to the good old days - we need to put Jerry Brown back in office!" Its an arguably conservative message that may be very appropriate for the times. Casting Whitman/Poizner as bickering idealogues & himself as a no-nonsense, can-do, hard worker is a reasonable strategy. How long before he puts out an ad "remember what a dump Oakland was before I became mayor? Let me fix California the way I fixed Oakland!"

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 2, 2010 8:50 AM | Report abuse

Fix, I feel like you are missing an aspect to the definition of a political insider. Jerry Brown does have a long history of political activism, but he has never fit the definition of an insider: he hasn't lined his pockets; he hasn't built a power circle of people who owe him; he hasn't stayed out of something or gone into something just because his party told him to (look at his trouble with Clinton); he has moved up and down in position as he wants to, without seeing it as losing.

Jerry Brown really seems to view politics as a calling and a responsibility, not as an ego trip full of perks for him and his pals. I think that is the reason he is willing to take on the misery that this governorship will be. Whoever wins the election in November is going to have tough going. I think Californians would be smart to choose Brown.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | June 2, 2010 8:46 AM | Report abuse

"Sestak seems to have weathered the whole job offer scandal just fine. He will hopefully build on this and whip Toomey in November."

Toomey looks to have an opening. He'll want to cast Sestak as the de facto incumbent - a member of Congress already, looking for a promotion - "but, does he deserve one?" Whereas Sestak will have to paint Toomey as an irrational idealogue who talks about shrinking government without providing details or discussing the consequences of such shrinks. I think Sestak has the tougher sale to make & will have to define Toomey, before Toomey can define himself.

Posted by: bsimon1 | June 2, 2010 8:42 AM | Report abuse

POLITICS THE ULTERIOR MOTIVE IN GULF OIL SPILL DISASTER?

Politics -- specifically, the geopolitics of chaos and confusion -- may be the ulterior motive behind criminal actions that led to the Gulf oil spill disaster.

ENDLESS GULF OIL SPILL: PURPOSEFUL 'END OF DAYS' POWER PLAY?

http://nowpublic.com/world/endless-gulf-oil-spill-purposeful-end-days-power-play

Gulf oil spill diverts attention from domestic atrocities against American citizens...

HOMELAND FUSION CENTERS SILENTLY ASSAULT, IMPAIR 'TARGETED' AMERICANS WITH CELL TOWER MICROWAVE RADIO FREQUENCY WEAPON SYSTEM, COMMUNITY VIGILANTISM, FINANCIAL SABOTAGE: VETERAN JOURNALIST

Are political leaders "targets" too?

http://nowpublic.com/world/u-s-silently-tortures-americans-cell-tower-microwaves

IDEOLOGICAL CENSORSHIP OF THE NET: NOT FOR CHINA ONLY

http://nowpublic.com/world/u-s-govt-censors-net-political-speech-targeted-americans OR NowPublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener50 | June 2, 2010 8:14 AM | Report abuse

I wonder if Griffith's loss increases the chances that the Democrat in the race wins in November. Griffith was a democrat so the seat can obviously go that way if you have the right candidate. This is Alabama though, which is about as red as they get.

Sestak seems to have weathered the whole job offer scandal just fine. He will hopefully build on this and whip Toomey in November.

Posted by: AndyR3 | June 2, 2010 7:52 AM | Report abuse

"Democrats wasted little time in seeking to slow Martinez's momentum. 'Susana Martinez is all steak, no sizzle,' said state Democratic party chairman Javier Gonzales in a statement late Tuesday night."

This is extraordinary high praise for an opponent.

Ds thought that of Alan Simpson[R] and Rs thought that of Mike Mansfield[D].

Susana Martinez is thus in rare company with two historic and respected mountain west legislators.

Or Gonzales misspoke, hilariously. Or FS and AB transposed, disastrously.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | June 2, 2010 7:37 AM | Report abuse


Under Health Care Reform, Health insurance is a must, but now you can easily find health insurance for $40 http://bit.ly/c3RV9F

Posted by: winsenronec | June 2, 2010 6:13 AM | Report abuse

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