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Retirement of SEIU president Andy Stern rocks labor world

1. Service Employees International Union president Andy Stern's expected retirement at the end of this week signals a changing of the guard atop one of the most politically powerful unions in the country.

Stern, whose departure was first reported by Politico's Ben Smith, has stood atop SEIU since 1996 and had been widely rumored to be considering retirement in recent years.

SEIU spokeswoman Michelle Ringuette would not confirm Stern's plans, saying only that he would "address these rumors at the close of the SEIU Executive Committee
meeting this week."

Stern's departure would come roughly six months after AFL-CIO president John Sweeney retired, handing the reins to longtime deputy Richrd Trumka. It would also be roughly five years after Stern led SEIU out of the AFL-CIO to serve as the primary building block for a rival labor coalition known as Change to Win.

The heir apparent for Stern at SEIU is Anna Burger who currently heads up Change to Win. The other name prominently mentioned as a Stern replacement is SEIU executive vice president Mary Kay Henry.

The pick would be made within 30 days of Stern's resignation by the SEIU executive committee. A simple majority would be all that was required to win the job.

No matter the choice to replace Stern, the challenge for the president will be significant. There is talk that Change to Win may eventually return to the AFL-CIO fold -- a delicate dance with which the next head of SEIU will be tasked.

2. Texas Republicans will choose their nominee in the state's 17th congressional district today with the winner to take on Rep. Chet Edwards in one of the most GOP-friendly seats held by a Democrat in the country.

Wealthy businessman Bill Flores finished ahead of 2008 Republican nominee Rob Curnock on March 2 but fell well short of the 50 percent mark needed to avoid a runoff.

Flores, who has given his campaign $320,000 of his own money, is regarded by establishment Republicans as the stronger of the two candidates as he has the capacity to compete financially (or come close) with Edwards. (As of mid February, Edwards had $1.4 million on hand.)

The central Texas district, which includes Texas A&M University in College Station, is strongly Republican. Sen. John McCain carried the seat with 67 percent in 2008 even as Edwards was beating Curnock 53 percent to 46 percent.

Edwards, who was House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's (Calif.) choice for vice president in 2008, has held the district since 1990 despite being a top Republican target for much of the last decade.

The Cook Political Report rates the race as "Lean Democrat" while the Rothenberg Political Report puts it into the "Democrat Favored" category.

ALSO READ: State Sen. Ted Deutch (D) is a heavy favorite to win the House special election in Florida's 19th district today.

3. Hoping to pull off a come-from-behind victory in the May 4 primary, former North Carolina state senator Cal Cunningham (D) took to the airwaves to introduce himself to Tarheel State voters.

The ad plays heavily on Cunningham's military service: "I always wanted to serve," Cunningham says at the start of the ad. He also seeks to draw a direct line between his service in Iraq and his current Senate run. "I'm running for U.S. Senate to fight a different kind of war," Cunningham says.

The ad is the first of Cunningham's primary race against attorney Ken Lewis and Secretary of State Elaine Marshall. Cunningham has the support of national Democrats who believe he is the best (only?) candidate who can beat Sen. Richard Burr (R) this fall. But Marshall is the best known of the three candidates and Lewis has the support of several prominent black leaders including former Charlotte mayor Harvey Gantt.

With six total candidates running, a runoff on June 22 is the most likely scenario. Both Cunningham and Marshall express confidence that if they make it to the runoff they are positioned to win.

4. Florida Sen. George LeMieux (R) will step aside from his seat at the end of the 111th Congress but is already weighing the possibility of a race against Sen. Bill Nelson (D) in 2012, according to several well-informed Republican sources.

LeMieux, who was appointed to his current post by Gov. Charlie Crist (R) in September 2009, has received generally positive grades for his service -- a remarkable contrast to Crist, his political patron, who has seen his one-time lead over former state House speaker Marco Rubio in the Senate primary race evaporate over the past few months.

It remains to be seen whether LeMieux would have a free shot at the Senate race. Most party strategists suggested that it was too early to handicap the 2012 race but emphasized that LeMieux's political fate was tied closely to that of Crist. An embarrassing Crist lost in the Aug. 24 primary could well short-circuit any future political plans for LeMieux.

Nelson will almost certainly be a major Republican target in 2012 no matter the candidate. He won reelection in 2006 thanks to a strong year nationally for Democrats and the fact that Republicans nominated then Rep. Katherine Harris, an unelectable and divisive candidate due to her role during the 2000 presidential recount. It's hard to envision GOP recruiters making such an egregious mistake again.

5. Democrats, hoping to keep former judge Brian Sandoval from winning the Republican primary for governor of Nevada, are running ads assailing his record on taxes.

The ad asserts that Sandoval "personally intervened, using the courts to force an $800 million tax increase; at the commercial's conclusion a narrator alleges that Sandoval is "not what he seems."

The commercials are being paid for by the Committee to Protect Nevada Jobs (innocent sounding enough, right?) a group, according to the Reno Gazette-Journal's Anjeanette Damon, that has financial ties to the Democratic Governors Association.

Democrats hope taking Sandoval down a few pegs politically in advance of the state's primary might help ensure that Gov. Jim Gibbons, the embattled chief executive of the state, winds up as the GOP nominee -- a scenario that would virtually ensure a victory this fall by Clark County Commission Chairman Rory Reid.

Polling conducted by Mason-Dixon for the Las Vegas Review Journal
suggests that Sandoval is in the driver's seat in the primary. He took 39 percent to 25 percent for Gibbons and seven percent for former North Las Vegas mayor Mike Montandon.

By Chris Cillizza  |  April 13, 2010; 5:55 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  
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Next: Republicans hold lead in generic ballot

Comments

@12BB - I'd highly recommend taking time to listen to a couple of shows from This American Life. The Giant Pool of Money and TGPoM-2. There was also a terrific report this past weekend on a company that apparently made the collapse much, much worse--Magnetar. Basically, they made sure that the CDOs would keep being issued by supporting the weakest tranches and then took out insurance to more than cover any losses. It was a joint report with Propublica--the firm that just won a Pulitzer.

http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/405/inside-job

BB

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | April 14, 2010 12:24 AM | Report abuse

Once labor unions began to co-opt "grass roots" organizing it was only a matter of time that businesses would do the same. Some pols have their own old fashioned grass roots organizations cultivated over time and with the expenditure of more shoe leather than cash. That is not what anyone in the press is talking about today. All these organizations, left and right, funded by lobbies, are astroturf. If the insurance industry can turn out 75000 employees to engage in politicking, that is like a grass roots organization in numbers. Same for unions turning out thousands of volunteers. But it is all astroturf.

==

Mark, this is the Ken Lay "everybody does it" defense and it's beneath you. Organized advocacy isn't grassroots spontaneity no matter how widespread nor who's doing it.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 8:21 PM | Report abuse

@ cryos,

Reasonable people can agree, eh.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:59 PM | Report abuse

Gotta go but thanks for the posts 12. Always good to learn new things and bounce ideas.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 6:57 PM | Report abuse

@ddawd,

You are kind to say it, but I feel like a blind man feeling an elephant. The financial system is so big, so complicated, and so global, that I fear that even the real experts (not me) don't understand it.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:54 PM | Report abuse

@cryos,

I am beginning to get concerned that the urgency for financial regulation has passed and now, it's back to business as usual. So, if some of the players who got us into this are part of the regulatory process, we'll just have to grit our teeth. We CAN'T wait until all clean players emerge--there aren't that many top Wall Street guys and firms and they just recirculate. If we wait for the innocent, I don't think it will ever happen.

I'm approaching retirement age, and it's hell trying to invest conservatively when the conservative equities turn out to blow up in your face. I thought widows and orphans bought bank stocks.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:45 PM
=====================================
I hope you are wrong but share your concerns.

The problem is if we let the dirty politicians design the laws they will make a shell game while the dirt gets swept under the rug and we will think we are covered when we are not.

Unfortunately retirement accounts have been hit REALLY hard this recession but they also got nailed in the dot-com and then tech crashes (which in my opinion those bubbles helped create the outsourcing and trade deficit situation as we become too "good" for "petty" manufacturing and labor jobs in favor of the service industry.

Regardless of political stripes to me the #1 priority needs to be stability and letting people who live the right way reap the rewards of their actions instead of have it all taken from them (whether by the government or companies).

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 6:53 PM | Report abuse

Thanks 12BB, I'm sure you're probably by far the most informed of all the regs on here. At least one of the few who won't be spouting nonsense Glass-Stegall related crap.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 6:38 PM
=============================
It is nice to debate and share information with someone like 12 who uses facts to back up opinions.

DDAWD I have tried several times with your on other threads but you always play the one sided games and deflect or simple ignore pertinent questions.

I can get into partisan sniping but my goal is to gain more information and people I disagree with I actually learn more from when productive.

You could learn a lot from 12.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 6:48 PM | Report abuse

@cryos,

I am beginning to get concerned that the urgency for financial regulation has passed and now, it's back to business as usual. So, if some of the players who got us into this are part of the regulatory process, we'll just have to grit our teeth. We CAN'T wait until all clean players emerge--there aren't that many top Wall Street guys and firms and they just recirculate. If we wait for the innocent, I don't think it will ever happen.

I'm approaching retirement age, and it's hell trying to invest conservatively when the conservative equities turn out to blow up in your face. I thought widows and orphans bought bank stocks.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:45 PM | Report abuse

To me though if we want sensible regulation you don't have the people in charge during the disaster in the back pocket of the companies writing it.
------------------------------------
Well, that is the HUGE problem isn't it. I fear our government is so sold out to Wall Street (this and prior administrations) that it is really Wall Street who writes all the financial laws. So, it might not matter which Senators draft the laws, it's really ole Goldman Sachs. I was hoping that our government got so scared at the near implosion, that they'd shake off the tentacles of Wall Street for a little while.

You know more about the European angle than I do, so I'll defer to you on that.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:35 PM
===============================
Yeah Goldman Sachs played both sides. It didn't matter if McCain or Obama won the election; Goldman Sachs was a winner.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 6:41 PM | Report abuse

Thanks 12BB, I'm sure you're probably by far the most informed of all the regs on here. At least one of the few who won't be spouting nonsense Glass-Stegall related crap.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 6:38 PM | Report abuse

To me though if we want sensible regulation you don't have the people in charge during the disaster in the back pocket of the companies writing it.
------------------------------------
Well, that is the HUGE problem isn't it. I fear our government is so sold out to Wall Street (this and prior administrations) that it is really Wall Street who writes all the financial laws. So, it might not matter which Senators draft the laws, it's really ole Goldman Sachs. I was hoping that our government got so scared at the near implosion, that they'd shake off the tentacles of Wall Street for a little while.

You know more about the European angle than I do, so I'll defer to you on that.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:35 PM | Report abuse

@cryos,

I'm not worried about Congress putting in too much financial regulation--I'm worried about too little. Further, what I'm really worried about is that we need global coordinated regulations, and that we'll never get cross jurisdictional agreement and enforcement. The days when financial firms are operate in one jurisdiction is gone. A lot of shenanigans took place in a London derivatives market whose U.S. firms' positions were hidden to US regulators. There was game playing that was unbelievable.

So, to tell you the truth, I don't care a great deal about Dodd's sweetheart deals. Not that it's right, but it's petty larceny. We need to get some kind of harness on the financial system, or the next time, we could have global disaster, and all my assets and yours will be worthless. THAT'S what I'm worried about.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:17 P
=============================
Agree with most of your post.

To me though if we want sensible regulation you don't have the people in charge during the disaster in the back pocket of the companies writing it.

So far as deregulation part of the reason for some of the deregulation like Glass-Steagall was to "stay competitive" with European banks who helped push the model of today's American "investment banks" who have no personal stake in the game.

Granted a small part but global banking definitely didn't do us any favors.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 6:26 PM | Report abuse

@cryos,

I'm not insinuating that you don't have a grasp of the disaster. What I'm saying is that I didn't have a grasp, and maybe still don't really know. I thought it was a mortgage problem, and bubble in the housing market, but that's just the tip of the iceberg.

I read a lot of blogs, and I am struck by how skeptical most people are that there even was a crisis.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:23 PM | Report abuse

@cryos,

I'm not worried about Congress putting in too much financial regulation--I'm worried about too little. Further, what I'm really worried about is that we need global coordinated regulations, and that we'll never get cross jurisdictional agreement and enforcement. The days when financial firms are operate in one jurisdiction is gone. A lot of shenanigans took place in a London derivatives market whose U.S. firms' positions were hidden to US regulators. There was game playing that was unbelievable.

So, to tell you the truth, I don't care a great deal about Dodd's sweetheart deals. Not that it's right, but it's petty larceny. We need to get some kind of harness on the financial system, or the next time, we could have global disaster, and all my assets and yours will be worthless. THAT'S what I'm worried about.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:17 PM | Report abuse

It WILL happen if we don't get better financial regulation -- there is nothing to stop it. The greed of Wall Street is unquenchable.

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 6:13 PM | Report abuse

Thanks by the way for the reference to Sorkin "Too Big to Fail" 12BarBlues.

Had heard of it I think but haven't read it.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 5:42 PM
----------------------------
It's a big huge book, but I stayed up at night turning the pages. First, you are reading about what was happening only 16 months ago, and you are reading who was doing what, and you'll know the names--Paulson, Geithner, the Lehman guy ?, ceo's of the Wall Street firms, etc. You'll recognize the names.

If you read that, you'll know more about what happened that 99% of the people, who just want to focus on some small part of the problem and think it's the whole thing. ]

Actually, I found it disturbing to find out just HOW bad things were. And, you know, nothing has changed legally, so it could happen again. How's that for scary?

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:00 PM
==================
Oh yeah I've spent I don't even know how many hours researching all the different angles on the financial and housing bubble.

I figured for several years we would see a crash since the rising housing prices were simply unsustainable and you can't price yourself out of reach of your consumers.

You seem to insinuate that I don't know the whole picture but you are far from correct if you are insinuating (might not be). I have a family member who works in management for a financial services corporation so have gotten unique perspectives from them as well.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 6:12 PM | Report abuse

Thanks by the way for the reference to Sorkin "Too Big to Fail" 12BarBlues.

Had heard of it I think but haven't read it.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 5:42 PM
----------------------------
It's a big huge book, but I stayed up at night turning the pages. First, you are reading about what was happening only 16 months ago, and you are reading who was doing what, and you'll know the names--Paulson, Geithner, the Lehman guy ?, ceo's of the Wall Street firms, etc. You'll recognize the names.

If you read that, you'll know more about what happened that 99% of the people, who just want to focus on some small part of the problem and think it's the whole thing. ]

Actually, I found it disturbing to find out just HOW bad things were. And, you know, nothing has changed legally, so it could happen again. How's that for scary?

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 6:00 PM | Report abuse

Thanks by the way for the reference to Sorkin "Too Big to Fail" 12BarBlues.

Had heard of it I think but haven't read it.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 5:42 PM | Report abuse

Who is at the bottom of the dogpile? Fannie/Freddie guaranteeing all of these mortgages. That was the enabler.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 5:10 PM
--------------------------------
There are a number of excellent books out about the 9/2008 crisis. One I recommend is ? Sorkin "Too Big to Fail". I guarantee it is worth reading and is very easy to read.

There are a lot of people to blame, & Fannie/Freddie bear their part. But blaming Fannie/Freddie for the global financial implosion is sort of like blaming the getaway car for the bank robbery. Granted, you need the car, but there are a LOT more guilty parties.

F/F played a part in the mortgage debacle, but that was actually a small part of the whole problem. There were 63 trillion dollars in credit default swaps that have nothing to do with mortgages.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 5:25 PM
==========================
yes but the assets behind many of those CDSs were the bad mortgages. Is Fannie/Freddie solely to blame? Of course not.

Private companies saw a way to make money off of bad loans and they lowered the standards across the board.

Part of my point is you have people embedded in these issues like Dodd and Frank writing the bills? Not a good move. Look forward to Dodd inserting a lot of poison pills into the bill.

Funny too Dodd plainly lied about the VIP mortgage issue which got very little attention.

A republican in his position lying about a loan directly tied to a bailout recipient would have meant his chairmanship if not his job. However the cover up job since he is a democrat means it will take the public to vote him out.

Look what it took to get the tax cheat Rangel from being responsible for heading writing tax laws.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 5:37 PM | Report abuse

Who is at the bottom of the dogpile? Fannie/Freddie guaranteeing all of these mortgages. That was the enabler.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 5:10 PM
--------------------------------
There are a number of excellent books out about the 9/2008 crisis. One I recommend is ? Sorkin "Too Big to Fail". I guarantee it is worth reading and is very easy to read.

There are a lot of people to blame, & Fannie/Freddie bear their part. But blaming Fannie/Freddie for the global financial implosion is sort of like blaming the getaway car for the bank robbery. Granted, you need the car, but there are a LOT more guilty parties.

F/F played a part in the mortgage debacle, but that was actually a small part of the whole problem. There were 63 trillion dollars in credit default swaps that have nothing to do with mortgages.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 5:25 PM | Report abuse

@drindl,

The rats are coming out of the woodwork. What this hedge fund did, was done all over the place. I just heard that WaMu was determined to have sold knowingly risky mortgages, packaged them up and sold them further down the line. Duh! Everyone was doing that, that WAS the problem. We have to realize that Wall Street/banks/hedge funds will do EVERYTHING they can to maximize profit, even if the entire global system goes down as a result. It's up to the regulators to keep pouring cold water on them, as best they can.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 2:40 PM
=========================
Who is at the bottom of the dogpile? Fannie/Freddie guaranteeing all of these mortgages. That was the enabler.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 5:10 PM | Report abuse

If crimes have been/are being committed by Wall St then why isn't the O admin prosecuting? Maybe because O likes the color of their money.

Posted by: leapin | April 13, 2010 4:57 PM
-----------------------------------
This isn't political. The reason that NONE of these "crimes" will be prosecuted is because they are NOT crimes. This is just like Enron--defrauds everyone, but just on this side of the law. That's why the laws should change. I don't know about you, but I lost a ton on money on Enron, Bank of America, Washington Mutual, Citi Bank, and I'm not going to get a damn penny back.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 5:07 PM | Report abuse

You read about the Magnetar trade, didn't you 12Bar?

"A hedge fund, Magnetar, helped create arcane mortgage-based instruments, pushed for risky things to go inside them and then bet against the investments."

"A few savvy financial engineers at a suburban Chicago hedge fund helped revive the Wall Street money machine, spawning billions of dollars of securities ultimately backed by home mortgages.

When the crash came, nearly all of these securities became worthless, a loss of an estimated $40 billion paid by investors, the investment banks who helped bring them into the world, and, eventually, American taxpayers. "

http://www.propublica.org/feature/the-magnetar-trade-how-one-hedge-fund-helped-keep-the-housing-bubble-going

Posted by: drindl
------------------------------------------
If crimes have been/are being committed by Wall St then why isn't the O admin prosecuting? Maybe because O likes the color of their money.

Posted by: leapin | April 13, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

1. I agree with Mark in Austin that it's unlikely that the Union's will speak with one voice again, at least for a very long time. EFCA failed and would not pass right now, either. I think each of the different labor sects have their own agenda and sort of now fights on their own. Stern's replacement will be someone in Stern's mold, so not a whole lot will likely change.

3. Here in my home state of NC, our primary on 05/04 should be a close one. Our sitting Senator Richard Burr is well liked, well funded, doesn't have alot of negatives and has no serious primary. He has 2 people running against him, but he will cruise to the primary victory with, likely, 60% or so of the vote. Then the Democratic primary for the senate seat is muddled and competitive, 3 ways. We have Sec. of State and state party establishment favorite Elaine Marshall vs. ex. state Sen. and National party establishment favorite Cal Cunningham vs. trial lawyer type & netroots type favorite Ken Lewis. Conventional wisdom suggests that Marshall & Cunningham will be the top 2 vote getters on 05/04 and will face off in the run-off. It's possible that Cunningham & Marshall could split the establishment vote allowing Lewis to capture enough votes to come in 2nd and make the run-off against either Marshall or Cunningham. At this juncture in the primary, I believe Elaine Marshall has her support high enough to make the run-off. Lewis could give national Dems. headaches as he siphons the anti-establishment and truly liberal voters from Cunningham to him. This is an interesting primary. I think it will likely be Marshall vs. Cunningham in the run-off, but watch Lewis as he could muster enough steam to knock out Cunningham and make the run-off. There is a reason Cunningham is starting to spend on t.v. already, he must or he risks losing the race before the run-off even happens.

Posted by: reason5 | April 13, 2010 2:50 PM | Report abuse

@drindl,

The rats are coming out of the woodwork. What this hedge fund did, was done all over the place. I just heard that WaMu was determined to have sold knowingly risky mortgages, packaged them up and sold them further down the line. Duh! Everyone was doing that, that WAS the problem. We have to realize that Wall Street/banks/hedge funds will do EVERYTHING they can to maximize profit, even if the entire global system goes down as a result. It's up to the regulators to keep pouring cold water on them, as best they can.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 2:40 PM | Report abuse

You read about the Magnetar trade, didn't you 12Bar?

"A hedge fund, Magnetar, helped create arcane mortgage-based instruments, pushed for risky things to go inside them and then bet against the investments."

"A few savvy financial engineers at a suburban Chicago hedge fund helped revive the Wall Street money machine, spawning billions of dollars of securities ultimately backed by home mortgages.

When the crash came, nearly all of these securities became worthless, a loss of an estimated $40 billion paid by investors, the investment banks who helped bring them into the world, and, eventually, American taxpayers. "

http://www.propublica.org/feature/the-magnetar-trade-how-one-hedge-fund-helped-keep-the-housing-bubble-going

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 2:28 PM | Report abuse

Bwahahaha!!!!!

I thought I suggested the most obvious, the least controversial idea that most people would support (of course, not Wall Street firms, but regular people like us).

What do I hear? [crickets]

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 2:16 PM | Report abuse

lol

and hush, we don't want Republicans to start being FOR any kind of regulation!

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

If I'd known my suggestion would stop all arguments, I would have proposed it before. Go figure...

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

@moonbat, cryos, ddawd,

I'll bet all of us can agree that some kind of financial regulation should govern credit default swaps and their derivatives. The idea that traders can take a position in the credit worthiness of another entity (in which they have no interest), and make money by "talking their credit down" strikes me as plain wrong and against public policy. That is a LARGE part of the reason for the meltdown in the banks and AIG.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 1:37 PM | Report abuse

My primary signal is the three month bollinger band backed up by fast stochastic and the 50 day / 100 day difference.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 1:32 PM | Report abuse

I know what you mean. I'll never buy mu for the same reason. It feels like a curse to me.

Isn't that funny--like the stock knows we owned it, but I STILL won't buy it.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 1:28 PM | Report abuse

I made no such accusation. Also, I couldn't find what specific type of finreg you hate. All I saw was...

"Oh that's right financial regulation and cap and trade are more important now.

Posted by: Cryos"

Obviously no one cares what you think sinc you're just a weird kid with an internet connection that only gets one page/

but if this is indicative of your party's thing, that's great for Democrats who get to run against these guys.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 1:27 PM | Report abuse

I was tempted by mu but it did not make my threshold. I will never buy lsi again after suffering miserably through a loss.

I had jdsu long ago around 250. Looks even better in the teens.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

I'll look at kopn. I've made money on that one.

Do you use gap-ups for buy signals? Looks like cat had one, which seems unusual for such a large float stock.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

Also back into gbx, wynn and kopn.

When everything is in breakout, it is more difficult to differentiate.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 1:21 PM | Report abuse

@moonbat,

Is jdsu a semi stock? I think I've owned it before, or did it have a different symbol. Any other semis? I've never seen one of the semis go up alone, and it always starts with the specialty chips like altr. I just have a feeling...

CAT is an expensive stock. I'm impressed.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 1:21 PM | Report abuse

'Where is the media blitz to change people's minds on health care?'

is there a meaning behind this word salad?

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 1:20 PM | Report abuse

sorry, cryos, I missed the part where you made a distinction as to what type of financial regulation you are against. I'll go back and look to see what specific concerns you had.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 1:14 PM
=======
LOL deflection again. You are pathetic.

It's ok that you can't answer the question. Criticizing as the opposition is easier than actually having to lead isn't it.

Care to answer any of the questions?

How about admitting you are lying about the spitting accusation?

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 1:18 PM | Report abuse

I did a major reshuffle yesterday. Bought jdsu, cat, and many others and took out the profit on my high flyers.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

sorry, cryos, I missed the part where you made a distinction as to what type of financial regulation you are against. I'll go back and look to see what specific concerns you had.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 1:14 PM | Report abuse

I know, drindl. This is my form of procrastinating on what I'm really supposed to be doing right now.


Berry. Is that you?

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 1:13 PM | Report abuse

Cryos, if it becomes a standard talking point that financial regulation is a waste of time, that's a political gift to Democrats equal to ten George Bushes.

Teabaggers blame Obama for the recession. Americans blame Wall Street. They can choose which side will give them the most votes.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:51 PM
============================
It is the TYPE of financial regulation. Just saying "financial regulation" and passing some garbage law only makes liberals cheer.

The point of my post which you seem to ignore is where is the focus on jobs? Is Obama's only plan on jobs to keep extending unemployment?

How is cap and trade going to help jobs?

Where is the media blitz to change people's minds on health care?

Don't worry I expect you to deflect or ignore.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 1:10 PM | Report abuse

@moonbat,

Techtalk: making any money going long today? Are you playing any semiconductor companies. I'm getting some buys there in the old, good names like Altera.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 1:09 PM | Report abuse

Berry is in an all day summit again. Like the previous ones, this is sure to produce nothing but it will make liberals gleeful because of the appearance of activity.

Like the climate summit.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Let me get that right...

Goes to prove the market always does the ONE thing that will create the maximum discomfort for the maximum number of investors.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Stock market is trying AGAIN to make new highs. Chug, chug. Don't know if it can do it. Goes to prove the market always does the ONE thing that will make create the maximum discomfort for the maximum number of investors.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 12:59 PM | Report abuse

cryos wrote: Liberals need GWB back. Without him you are an empty shell without a leg to stand on.
------------------------------
Too bad you couldn't get 65 million people to agree with you.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 13, 2010 12:54 PM | Report abuse

the violence starts to escalate, with Republican officials egging the traitors on:

"The Associated Press reports that Oklahoma tea party leaders, “frustrated by recent political setbacks,” are working with right-wing Republicans in the Oklahoma legislature to create a new “volunteer militia to help defend against what they believe are improper federal infringements on state sovereignty.” State Sen. Randy Brogdon (R-OK) and State Rep. Charles Key (R-OK) have met with tea party leaders, like J.W. Berry of the Tulsa-based OKforTea group, to plan legislation for a state-authorized militia. Brogdon, who is running for Governor and sponsored the right-wing anti-health reform “state sovereignty” resolution in his state, explained that he believes his anti-federal government militia has constitutional backing:

The founding fathers “were not referring to a turkey shoot or a quail hunt. They really weren’t even talking about us having the ability to protect ourselves against each other,” Brogdon said. “The Second Amendment deals directly with the right of an individual to keep and bear arms to protect themselves from an overreaching federal government.”

But critics say the tea party militia idea could “throw fuel in the fire of radicals.” Even some Republicans are opposed to Brogdon’s initiative. “If the intent is to create a militia for disaster relief, we have the National Guard,” said Sen. Steve Russell, (R-OK), a retired Army lieutenant colonel. “Anything beyond that purpose should be viewed with great concern and caution.” Indeed, the news of the state-sponsored militia movement arrives shortly before the 15th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, on April 19.

Berry, the tea party leader who first solicited support for the militia, has posted rants against President Obama: the “Muslim President” — a “reincarnation of Pol Pot” who is trying imprison Americans for resisting health reform. One ominous posting from Berry says that his militia should “launch a thousand guerrilla attacks on the plans that these people have to ruin us and our country.”

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 12:52 PM | Report abuse

Cryos, if it becomes a standard talking point that financial regulation is a waste of time, that's a political gift to Democrats equal to ten George Bushes.

Teabaggers blame Obama for the recession. Americans blame Wall Street. They can choose which side will give them the most votes.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:51 PM | Report abuse

Liberals need GWB back. Without him you are an empty shell without a leg to stand on.

Being the opposition you at least could complain about how someone else was doing it wrong and throw out your unrealistic ideology.

Now that liberals are in power America sees they don't have the slightest clue how to govern and you have no one to blame. So pathetic even with a supermajority democrats try still blaming republicans for their own failures.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:48 PM | Report abuse

What a sad thread. I guess it's for liberals to circle jerk each other and throw out slanderous accusations they can't back up.

Good thing the liberal leadership went overboard and the American people are seeing through the media propaganda and figuring out the trailer/ghetto trash the democratic party has become.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:44 PM | Report abuse

Writing something, dawd? It's always easier to do almost anything else, I always find. Check this out, speaking of unions today:

"Last Friday, Rush Limbaugh asked why a coal miner union didn’t protect the 29 miners who were killed when Massey Energy’s Upper Big Branch Mine in Montcoal, WV, exploded under unsafe conditions:

Was there no union responsibility for improving mine safety? Where was the union here? Where was the union? The union is generally holding these companies up demanding all kinds of safety. Why were these miners continuing to work in what apparently was an unsafe atmosphere?


There’s a simple reason the union didn’t protect the miners: the Upper Big Branch Mine, like nearly all of the mines under Massey CEO Don Blankenship’s control, is non-union. In fact, the United Mine Workers of America (UMW) “tried three times to organize the Upper Big Branch mine, but even with getting nearly 70 percent of workers to sign cards saying they wanted to vote for a union, Blankenship personally met with workers to threaten them with closing down the mine and losing their jobs if they voted for a union.”

Blankenship rose in Massey’s ranks by breaking its union mines in the 1980s. Blankenship said then that busting unions is “invaluable” to profits, as non-union companies can “sell coal cheaper and drive union coal out of business.”

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 12:38 PM | Report abuse

'You have the analytical capabilities of a 6 year old girl.'

ooo, dawd, got you a live one there! LOL, where do they find these idiots.

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 12:35 PM | Report abuse

I know, drindl. This is my form of procrastinating on what I'm really supposed to be doing right now.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:34 PM | Report abuse

lol@Cryos thinking financial reg isn't important.

Do YOU have one of those connections that doesn't go to any webpage but this one?

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:30 PM
=================
What's a matter can't counter my posts?

You must make minimum wage as a paid blogger.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:33 PM | Report abuse

You can't argue with someone whose brain is fried on fox propaganda, dawd. they couldn't recognize truth if it bit them. sad cases, past help.

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 12:31 PM | Report abuse

lol@Cryos thinking financial reg isn't important.

Do YOU have one of those connections that doesn't go to any webpage but this one?

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:30 PM | Report abuse

@Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:06 PM

So it is your argument that McDonnell was raked over the coals because it was an attempt to distract the country from HCR and the economy?

Posted by: ModerateVoter | April 13, 2010 12:21 PM
=====================
Yep that's exactly what it is. McDonnell, Steele, the lying congressmen, the "brick in the window" all that garbage is the "media blitz" propaganda spin.

Where is the "focus on jobs" and "health care blitz" otherwise?

Oh that's right financial regulation and cap and trade are more important now.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:25 PM | Report abuse

And what is it with Conervatives just making stuff up. Like seriously, you do realize I have the whole internet here, right? I don't have one of those connections where I'm limited to this webpage.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:24 PM | Report abuse

There was a murder last week and no arrests were made. And OMG, it turned out he was really not dead!!!!

Nice job, yo.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:22 PM | Report abuse

@Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:06 PM

So it is your argument that McDonnell was raked over the coals because it was an attempt to distract the country from HCR and the economy?

Posted by: ModerateVoter | April 13, 2010 12:21 PM | Report abuse

If you people have such problem being characterized as racists, perhaps cut it out with the racial slurs and the spitting on black congressmen?

Just a thought.

Or I guess you can go with the "this is everybody's fault, but mine!"

Good luck trying to get sympathy with that line, haha.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:13 PM
===============
You are such a tool it's sad.

You prove exactly my point where liberals' policies are so horrible and so out of touch all you can do is slander. What's a matter quivering because your ilk will be dog food come November?

The congressman RECANTED THE SPITTING ACCUSATION in case you didn't hear Sherlock. Also there were no arrests that day so it makes him a liar X 2.

Just keep your head in the sand though and lie.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:19 PM | Report abuse

BTW, I think Scott Brown knows that he is precariously positioned as a GOPer in Massachusetts and is starting to look a lot more like Olympia Snowe than Tom Coburn. I will be interested to see how he votes on the Bank Reform legislation/SC nominee/climate change bill. On climate change I think the Kerry/Lieberman/Graham group would be smart to approach him now on the climate bill and start courting his support. I think his vote is there to be had. That is if he wants to remain a senator??

==

Fascinating stuff.

The three Republican "taunting points": McDonnell, Christie, Brown.

McDonnell: let's celebrate the Confederacy. Slavery? What was that?

Christie: cutting essential services and scrupulously leaving the wealthy untouched

Brown: we shall see, we shall see (to the tune of The Stranglers' "Shah Shah A-Go-Go")

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 11:10 AM
===============
Actually with posts like this I think you are the boil.

McDonnell: - Oh boohoo. Slavery wasn't mentioned lets all cry about it because whites don't feel guilty enough.

Christie: Liberals pass all these entitlement programs and waste education money on administrators and unqualified teachers and then you try claiming it is essentially services? Sorry but cuts have to happen from somewhere.

Guess what the "rich" people are the people creating cash register jobs for people like you.

Brown: Can't even interpret that crackhead post.

You have the analytical capabilities of a 6 year old girl.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:15 PM | Report abuse

Also, Gene Weingarten won his second Pulitzer for this work.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/27/AR2009022701549.html

Beautifully done. It's on the phenomenon of parents forgetting their kids in cars.

==

REALLY need to wonder why a paper with such luminaries in its stable would also host such thick-witted mediocrities and sickies like Will, Krauthammer, Thiessen, and the like.

And permit this GOP water carrier.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 12:15 PM | Report abuse

If you people have such problem being characterized as racists, perhaps cut it out with the racial slurs and the spitting on black congressmen?

Just a thought.

Or I guess you can go with the "this is everybody's fault, but mine!"

Good luck trying to get sympathy with that line, haha.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 12:13 PM | Report abuse

Zouk, you are a boil on the azs of this blog. Shut the f uck up.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 12:10 PM | Report abuse

Berry is in an all day summit again. Like the previous ones, this is sure to produce nothing but it will make liberals gleeful because of the appearance of activity.

Like the climate summit.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 12:07 PM | Report abuse

"You liberals are so pathetic. The "health care blitz" has turned into PC overboard trying to make republicans look bad because you know the health care bill is garbage.

Get a life. Face it America is finding out liberal policies suck and they know the MSM is in the tank. Boohoo liberals should have kept some cards at their chest instead of going all out.

Posted by: Cryos"


http://cdn2.knowyourmeme.com/i/7281/original/blurb_facepalm2_20090622.jpg

Dude, the Robinson column was on McDonnell's proclamation of Confederate History Month, not health care.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 11:44 AM
====================
Sorry I forgot I was speaking to the mentally deficient. Here let me put it in more simple terms.

Democrats announced they would have this "health care blitz." They are saying nothing about health care.

However there is a lot of media propaganda about "extremists making threats," and making mountains out of molehills of every single small issue ($2,000 at a strib club for example).

Why? Because their only shot is blowing up non-stories to try to discredit republicans because they know their bill is garbage along with their other economy killing proposals.

Democrats can't win with the issues so they are resorting to slander. Race baiting liars lying about being spit on for example and media not covering him recanting the accusation.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 12:06 PM | Report abuse

Also, Gene Weingarten won his second Pulitzer for this work.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/27/AR2009022701549.html

Beautifully done. It's on the phenomenon of parents forgetting their kids in cars.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 11:56 AM | Report abuse

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/04/12/AR2010041203297.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

Eugene Robinson on Barbour, McDonnell, and slavery

==

Jesus god that was great.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 11:52 AM | Report abuse

A preview of the all stooge nutwork today:

palin is dumb

==

What a pity she's withholding all evidence to the contrary. Leaves you nothing to work with.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 11:49 AM | Report abuse

Kung pao dog for lunch?

Garlic leeches instead?

Good thing blow up dolls don't eat. Keeps the cost down.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 11:46 AM | Report abuse

"You liberals are so pathetic. The "health care blitz" has turned into PC overboard trying to make republicans look bad because you know the health care bill is garbage.

Get a life. Face it America is finding out liberal policies suck and they know the MSM is in the tank. Boohoo liberals should have kept some cards at their chest instead of going all out.

Posted by: Cryos"


http://cdn2.knowyourmeme.com/i/7281/original/blurb_facepalm2_20090622.jpg

Dude, the Robinson column was on McDonnell's proclamation of Confederate History Month, not health care.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 11:44 AM | Report abuse

I don't think McDonnell is going to tone it down.

I think he's going the other way. His Confederacy move wasn't just tone-deaf, it was a two-handed shove to the chest. He's looking for a fight.

We told you so, we told you so. Nyaah nyaah nyaah nyaah nyaah.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 11:41 AM | Report abuse

Eugene Robinson on Barbour, McDonnell, and slavery

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 11:36 AM
====================
Who cares what that racist, leftist thinks.

You liberals are so pathetic. The "health care blitz" has turned into PC overboard trying to make republicans look bad because you know the health care bill is garbage.

Get a life. Face it America is finding out liberal policies suck and they know the MSM is in the tank. Boohoo liberals should have kept some cards at their chest instead of going all out.

Posted by: Cryos | April 13, 2010 11:41 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 11:36 AM | Report abuse

You clowns have nothing to say, yet you post on.

Poor lonely Ped.

Obviously he must retire before his appointment to the court.

A preview of the all stooge nutwork today:

palin is dumb
repubs are evil
Obama is god
we need more government. More spending
surrender is good.


You loons can now take the rest of the week off.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 11:34 AM | Report abuse

ACORN, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the SEIU and an essential component in the whole money-laundering scheme by which money from taxpayers is transferred to political campaigns, is in deep trouble. Maybe that's where Stern will end up, though of course he will keep his private office in the White House.

Posted by: JBaustian | April 13, 2010 11:33 AM | Report abuse

I know it's pretty early to talk about McDonnell's demise, but I really don't think Virginia is going to enjoy his nonsense. Obviously he's always been too conservative for the purple/blue state, but he managed to hide that in his campaign. The hope was that he'd turned over a new lead or something. Obviously not the case. Virginia can't vote him out since he's term limited, but they do have a say over the next governor as well as how they vote in other elections. It's like how Bush couldn't be voted out in 2008, but he was essentially booed off the stage. McDonnell is really going to need to tone it down to avoid that same fate.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 11:32 AM | Report abuse

Ask Creigh Deeds, Jon Corzine and Martha Coakley about the false narrative of ascendent Republicans.

Posted by: JakeD3 | April 13, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

Is anyone talking about a political appointment for Andy Stern?


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 13, 2010 11:29 AM | Report abuse

Chris usually does identify the political leanings of a group, but to ID political leaning isn't the same thing as pointing out ties and loyalties to other groups. I could start a group right now and it would be a liberal group, but it would be a grassroots group as it's without ties. You can't say that about anything that Dick Armey is doing. Not that it necessarily diminishes the legitimacy of whatever he is trying to do, but it's very different.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

Zouk, your act is tired as Vaudeville. If you've nothing to say, then say nothing.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 11:19 AM | Report abuse

Oh, No! The Dow has slipped below 11,000!

DAMN YOU, PRESIDENT OBAMA!!!

Posted by: Bondosan | April 13, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

The ever loyal and perpetually unassigned stooges of the left carpet post the usual idiocy. Again.

Posted by: Moonbat | April 13, 2010 11:10 AM | Report abuse

BTW, I think Scott Brown knows that he is precariously positioned as a GOPer in Massachusetts and is starting to look a lot more like Olympia Snowe than Tom Coburn. I will be interested to see how he votes on the Bank Reform legislation/SC nominee/climate change bill. On climate change I think the Kerry/Lieberman/Graham group would be smart to approach him now on the climate bill and start courting his support. I think his vote is there to be had. That is if he wants to remain a senator??

==

Fascinating stuff.

The three Republican "taunting points": McDonnell, Christie, Brown.

McDonnell: let's celebrate the Confederacy. Slavery? What was that?

Christie: cutting essential services and scrupulously leaving the wealthy untouched

Brown: we shall see, we shall see (to the tune of The Stranglers' "Shah Shah A-Go-Go")

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 11:10 AM | Report abuse

We know it means that, Mark. I would bet, though that a lot of the folks who show up for tea party events don't know they are funded by industry groups. Don't know they are the unpaid foot soldiers in a PR war. Probably a lot of them don't know that Freedom Works was founded by a group of super-wealth heirs to the tobacco, HC, and oil industry and other elites.

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 11:03 AM | Report abuse

If you would like to maintain even a semblance of journalistic integrity, perhaps from now on, when you mention any lobbying group, you might also mention who it is that's behind them -- whose money is setting the read agenda.

==

Since journalistic integritynis at odds with the false narrative of ascendent Republicans, and since this blog is clearly dedicated to the Republican Rising portrayal, I wouldn't hold my breath if I were you.

Some very informative posts today. Thanks.

I don't nurture a lot of hope that the fact of the reduced deficit will intrude too effectively into the "national environment favoring Republicans" meme. Matter of fact I expect it to be drowned out entirely in noise.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 11:00 AM | Report abuse

TexasProud, drindl, and Ddawd are all correct because the definition of "grassroots" as was understood in 1950 is no longer followed by the media or even by the public. TexasProud distinguishes between party arms and external funding. CC usually identifies external funding as "conservative" or "liberal" or "industry or labor or--" so he does not deserve heat for saying "the conservative grass roots organization", among political junkies. We know it means an organization funded by a conservative lobby.

Once labor unions began to co-opt "grass roots" organizing it was only a matter of time that businesses would do the same. Some pols have their own old fashioned grass roots organizations cultivated over time and with the expenditure of more shoe leather than cash. That is not what anyone in the press is talking about today. All these organizations, left and right, funded by lobbies, are astroturf. If the insurance industry can turn out 75000 employees to engage in politicking, that is like a grass roots organization in numbers. Same for unions turning out thousands of volunteers. But it is all astroturf.

So do not call each other names, but read the code.
And please, CC, always identify "conservative" or "liberal" or party affiliated and we will get it. If you know more, such as which union or which industry started the astroturf organization, and how many people it can actually turn out, tell us that, too.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | April 13, 2010 10:49 AM | Report abuse

SEIU used 60 Million in Union dues to fund President Obama's Campaigns...How much do they spend on members Healthcare benefits?

Posted by: jab3698 | April 13, 2010 10:48 AM | Report abuse

From the Post,
"The federal deficit is running significantly lower than it did last year, with the budget gap for the first half of fiscal 2010 down 8 percent over the same period a year ago"

If this trend continues this will be bad news for the GOP's take over hopes. One of their big points is that Obama isnt' addressing the massive deficits that we are facing. If he can argue that he decreased the deficit by 300 billion dollars (the estimated effect currently) than it will build on the idea that we should stay the course. I said it before and I'll say it again the GOP peaked with Scott Brown's election, and since that point it has been better and better news for the White House.

BTW, I think Scott Brown knows that he is precariously positioned as a GOPer in Massachusetts and is starting to look a lot more like Olympia Snowe than Tom Coburn. I will be interested to see how he votes on the Bank Reform legislation/SC nominee/climate change bill. On climate change I think the Kerry/Lieberman/Graham group would be smart to approach him now on the climate bill and start courting his support. I think his vote is there to be had. That is if he wants to remain a senator??

Posted by: AndyR3 | April 13, 2010 10:33 AM | Report abuse

'liberal blinders.' LOL.

Founders of Freedom Works/Tea Party:

--C. Boyden Grey, heir to the Reynolds tobacco fortune and King of Astroturf:

"In a lengthy profile of Gray in 1997, The New Republic magazine wrote "So many different money trails lead to, by and through Gray it is bewildering." There is Gray the lobbyist, Gray the lawyer, Gray the former White House Counsel, Gray the chairman of Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE), Gray the head of the Alliance for Reasonable Regulation, Gray the co-chair of the Air Quality Standards Coalition, Gray the board member of Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, Gray the major soft money contributor to the Republican Party, Gray the friend of judges and justices (many of whom owe their jobs to him), to name but a few." [3]

Add to this the most recent of Gray's "organizations" and you come up with (see other links below) Gray, John D. Podesta and Timothy E. Wirth, connected by funding provided by R. E. Ted Turner in both the Energy Coalition Foundation (June 2003) and Energy Future Coalition (2002-3), Gray's newest media connection to Media General (May 2003), the Committee for the Republic (July 2003), and a continuous link to all things "Bush" and "corporate."

--Republican Dick Armey, former U.S. House Majority Leader

--Jack Kemp --- co-chairman of the Alexis de Tocqueville Institute (AdTI), a conservative, anti-tax think-tank, in the mid-1990s at a time when AdTI was involved in pro-tobacco activities sponsored by Philip Morris . In 1996, the Republican Party's vice presidential candidate.

--William Bennett - William J. Bennett, formerly Secretary of Education under Ronald Reagan and Director of National Drug Control Policy under George Herbert Walker Bush."

Very GRASSROOTY, huh? nothing to do with indsutry front groups or the Republican party or anything like that.

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 10:32 AM | Report abuse

"drindl,

the differences between the two is 1)freedom works is a grassroots organization not tied to any Republican affiliated campaign groups. They are conservative but not directly responsive to the GOP and 2) DGA is a democratic affiliated group. Take off the liberal blinders and see the difference.

Posted by: TexasProud1"

facepalm
http://cdn3.knowyourmeme.com/i/6515/original/jesus-facepalm-facepalm-jesus-epic-demotivational-poster-1218659828.jpg

You do realize that Armey used to have a different career, right?

Posted by: DDAWD | April 13, 2010 10:23 AM | Report abuse

drindl,

the differences between the two is 1)freedom works is a grassroots organization not tied to any Republican affiliated campaign groups. They are conservative but not directly responsive to the GOP and 2) DGA is a democratic affiliated group. Take off the liberal blinders and see the difference.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | April 13, 2010 10:04 AM | Report abuse

"The commercials are being paid for by the Committee to Protect Neada Jobs (innocent sounding enough, right?" a group, according to the Reno Gazette-Journal's Anjeanette Damon, that has financial ties to the Democratic Governors Association."

Question, CC - you post the names of astroturf orgs all the time that are nothing but fronts for the Republican party -- yet you have never once, that I have seen, called them out on it.

You have mentioned, for instance, many times, Dick Armey's Freedom Works, yet you have never mentioned that it's a front group for health insurance industry, and that they paid for all the buses, hotels, food and per deim expenses for most of the larger tea party events, or that they are also the recipients of quite a bit of Republican party largesse.

If you would like to maintain even a semblance of journalistic integrity, perhaps from now on, when you mention any lobbying group, you might also mention who it is that's behind them -- whose money is setting the read agenda.

Posted by: drindl | April 13, 2010 9:45 AM | Report abuse

Politics becomes a meaningless sideshow when mainstream media takes the handout and refuse to see the forest for the trees:

THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA HAS YET TO PICK UP ON 'PROJECT GENEVA' ...

...APPARENTLY A SECRET TEAM OBAMA-ORDERED TASK FORCE TO STOP COVERT DOMESTIC TORTURE AND IMPAIRMENT OF EXTRAJUDICIALLY, UNJUSTLY 'TARGETED' AMERICAN CITIZENS.

***
Key political leaders, Congress, kept in the dark about cell tower superweapon?

"MR. OBAMA, TEAR DOWN THOSE HOMELAND CELLULAR TORTURE TOWERS!"

http://nowpublic.com/world/u-s-silently-tortures-americans-cell-tower-microwaves
http://nowpublic.com/world/gestapo-usa-govt-funded-vigilante-network-terrorizes-america

ATTENTION 'PROJECT GENEVA' TEAM MEMBERS:

Let me shortcut your important work; see latest "comments" pages of this article:
http://nowpublic.com/world/u-s-govt-uses-cbs-news-cover-microwave-cell-tower-torture OR NowPublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener50 | April 13, 2010 9:36 AM | Report abuse

Does anyone think that Glenn Beck is considered a reason for Andy Stern's resignation?

Posted by: siennablue | April 13, 2010 9:21 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: joekenehan | April 13, 2010 9:09 AM | Report abuse

Mark, Interesting info on the union break down. Frankly, I see unification of the major unions as an inevitable conclusion to all this. Strong unions are an important part of our economy and I think are essential to the future prosperity of america. The recent mine disaster in WV is an example of why we need strong labor unions. The situation that led to that explosion would never happen in a union mine because of the safety requirements that the union requires. That being said the current union leadership is a joke. These folks don't give a squat about the working man or progress, they only care about their political clout and their own influence in the process. If they did care about the worker than they would check their egos at the door and reunite to present a more powerful front.

Chet Edwards is just fine. He is one of those congressmen who basically knows most of his constituents by name.

On NC, I think Marshall may win the primary. Cunningham has been lack-luster at best, and Lewis doesn't have a chance. I would be interested to know who Kay Hagan is backing (either publicly or privately) in this race. She built a pretty descent grassroots following last year and I would be willing to bet that she would tap that orginization to take down Burr. I also think Burr needs to support something like Bank Reform or cap and trade to strengthen his independent credentials, which is what he ran on 6 years ago.

By 2012, the economy will be pretty well recovered and the deficit will be heading down (around 300 billion or so). The Democrats (like Bill Nelson in FL) will ride Obama's coattails to victory.

Posted by: AndyR3 | April 13, 2010 7:48 AM | Report abuse

Nelson may get a 2012 challenger? So that's why he cut those special deals for angry Florida seniors...

http://www.political-buzz.com/

Posted by: parkerfl1 | April 13, 2010 7:35 AM | Report abuse

re: Stern

Short history:

1. Sweeney rides growth of his SEIU to presidency of AFL-CIO. His protege, Stern, becomes prez of SEIU.
2. In 2005, Stern leads SEIU out of AFL-CIO, stabbing his mentor in the back by claiming AFL-CIO had become the bank for the Ds.
3. Stern gets the textile union [UNITE] and the hotel and restaurant union [HERE], which had united in 2004 as UNITE-HERE, and the Teamsters to form a competing coalition to AFL-CIO called "Change To Win" [CTW]. CTW has the growing unions, further weakening AFL-CIO.
[4. Specter leaves the Rs and the Ds want to get his vote on an EFCA compromise. ]
5. Stern announces his willingness to compromise. At that time I was sure a compromise had been worked out.
6. Then Wilhelm, also of CTW [HERE], says Stern does not speak for all of CTW.
7. Trying to get their house in order, AFL-CIO, CTW, and the eleven international unions form the National Labor Coordinating Committee [NLCC]. They meet with BHO in July. They do not agree among themselves what they want.
8. David Bonior tries to get AFL-CIO, CTW, and NEA to merge. That goes nowhere. Sweeney and Stern hate each other.
9. UNITE and HERE begin to fall apart [power struggle between Wilhelm and another guy, Raynor, who calls his opponents "thugs". Wilhelm accuses Raynor of "looting"].
10. Stern tries to pick off health care locals from the UNITE-HERE fallout for SEIU. NYT labor columnist Steve Greenhouse calls it the "nastiest...labor fratricide in decades".
11. Two biggies in AFL-CIO call Stern "divisive" and "Darth Vader".
12. International Association of Machinists [IAM] accuses AFL-CIO of financial wrongdoing.
13. SEIU's Pension Fund is reported in "critical status". IAM accuses AFL-CIO of wasting $200M on lobbying since 1993 and then Stern helpfully adds that SEIU spent $60M on BHO.
14. To help advance the political agenda of SEIU, it laid off 75 field organizers [guess I don't have to worry about SEIU organizing, anyway] and moved $10M to political efforts.

The result: Labor no longer talks with one voice, or two, or three, and the rifts and cleavages are so deep and mean that EFCA was crippled beyond offering any possible compromise I thought all would accept. The American Federation of Teachers [AFT] with whom I deal most often, sent me a newsletter about this and this is their conclusion, that I am repeating.

Sweeney, and now Stern, leaving, would seem to give organized labor a chance to reunite, as CC suggested.
But the emerging leaders also are not fond of each other. Woodruff orchestrated the SEIU split from AFL-CIO for Stern and is a tough organizer. I think a shake-out period is to follow, and perhaps some diminution in political clout for the 2010 midterms while the instability reigns.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | April 13, 2010 7:27 AM | Report abuse

We are an nonprofit representing the Azerbaijani-American community, and are trying to do research on health care, taxation and social security issues. Basically, through our research, we are overwhelmed with tons of information, and in order to be able to clearly and concisely formulate the choices to our members, we would be very interested in seeing some one-pagers outlining the pro's and con's on these topics. It would be also interesting to see what are other similar nonprofits thinking and doing. Being a grassroots organization, with a diverse membership, we need to be able to "keep it short" and easy to understand for busy people who don't particularly like or enjoy politics. If you have some tips, pointers and such information, could you please email it to me directly , or via our website www.USAzeris.org

Posted by: jancanan | April 13, 2010 7:10 AM | Report abuse

We are an nonprofit representing the Azerbaijani-American community, and are trying to do research on health care, taxation and social security issues. Basically, through our research, we are overwhelmed with tons of information, and in order to be able to clearly and concisely formulate the choices to our members, we would be very interested in seeing some one-pagers outlining the pro's and con's on these topics. It would be also interesting to see what are other similar nonprofits thinking and doing. Being a grassroots organization, with a diverse membership, we need to be able to "keep it short" and easy to understand for busy people who don't particularly like or enjoy politics. If you have some tips, pointers and such information, could you please email it to me directly , or via our website www.USAzeris.org

Posted by: jancanan | April 13, 2010 7:03 AM | Report abuse

Nothing gets CC out of bed earlier than the opportunity to post more Bad News For Democrats narratives. At least it isn't the P-people this time.

Hard to envision the GOP recruiters making a big mistake? Not on this planet it isn't.

Posted by: Noacoler | April 13, 2010 6:16 AM | Report abuse

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