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Alan Mollohan fights for his political life

By Chris Cillizza, Aaron Blake and Felicia Sonmez

1. Just days after Utah Sen. Bob Bennett (R) watched his political career ended by an unhappy party base, West Virginia Rep. Alan Mollohan (D) is hoping to avoid the same fate.

Mollohan, who, like Bennett, followed his father's footsteps into Congress, has watched as the anti-incumbent mood nationwide and years of inattention to the politics of his district have combined to imperil him in the Mountaineer State primary today, according to party sources familiar with the race.

State Sen. Mike Oliverio (D) has painted Mollohan as a creature of Washington -- the Congressman has held the 1st district since 1982 -- and used past ethical questions to suggest that the incumbent's time has run out.

The race has gotten very nasty over its final weeks with Oliverio referring to Mollohan as "one of the most corrupt members of Congress" and the incumbent retorting that his opponent is "lying" and "spreading right-wing smears". And, that's just the television ads!

Mollohan, not surprisingly, has enjoyed a financial edge in the race. As of April 21, Mollohan had raised $799,000 with $191,000 in the bank while Oliverio had collected $320,000 with $70,000 left on hand.

Neutral Democratic observers acknowledge that the race is a genuine toss up. Republican strategists are quietly rooting for Mollohan to survive, believing that lingering ethical questions and the GOP nature of the district will deliver them a victory. (Republicans have a six-way primary of their own in the district.)

A Mollohan loss -- coming so quickly after Bennett's defeat -- would add to the growing sense that it's hard out there for an incumbent (of either party) and set the stage for an exciting night on May 18 when Sens. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.) and Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.) are on the primary ballot.

Poll close in West Virginia at 7:30 pm.

2. Conservative outside groups have begun flooding the television and radio airwaves in southwestern Pennsylvania in advance of next week's 12th district special election.

The American Action Network, a center-right advocacy organization founded by former Minnesota Sen. Norm Coleman, is running radio ads that cast businessman Tim Burns (R) as the right man to deal with the nation's economic problems because of his background in business, as opposed to politics.

"Tim Burns is a real job maker," says the ad's narrator. "He came up the hard way, knows the value of a dollar. As a local businessman, Tim created 400 jobs right here. Tim Burns knows how to grow our economy. He's done it before."

The radio buy is costing American Action Network $26,000, according to a source familiar with it.

Another conservative independent group, Americans for Prosperity, is up with television ads in the district that hit former congressional aide Mark Critz (D) on his position on energy policy.

"Barack Obama and Nancy Pelosi are pushing a huge energy tax in their global warming bill that will drive up gas prices and utility bills and cost Pennsylvania jobs," says the ad's narrator. "But Mark Critz won't sign the no climate tax pledge to oppose these taxes and protect Pennsylvania jobs." The narrator goes on to urge Critz to "oppose the Obama/Pelosi hidden energy tax".

The AFP ad is running in the Johnstown market only.

With the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee on Monday pulling out of this month's special election in Hawaii, the Pennsylvania race has taken on added significance as a gauge of the current political environment.

To that end, the National Republican Congressional Committee has now spent $959,000 in independent expenditures in the race, according to the most recent filings to the Federal Election Commission. The DCCC has spent $646,000 on the seat to date.

3. A new poll conducted for the NRCC shows an unlikely target emerging in Florida.

The previously unreleased poll, which was obtained by The Fix, shows Rep. Allen Boyd (D-Fla.) trailing funeral home director Steve Southerland 52 percent to 37 percent despite the fact that less than one in five voters recognize Southerland's name.

The numbers are particularly noteworthy considering that Boyd has barely registered on GOP target lists to date. A GOP source says that the race has taken on new prominence since the Tarrance Group poll was conducted in mid-April.

Boyd's numbers should be a warning sign to other southern Democrats sitting in swing districts who have so far escaped much electoral scrutiny. Just 26 percent of voters say Boyd deserves to be reelected, and his approval rating is just 34 percent (compared to 48 percent disapproval).

Boyd doesn't seem to have pleased anybody with his health care vote; even though he voted for the bill, his approval among Democrats is just 45 percent. That could be why he's already running ads for his August primary against underfunded state Sen. Al Lawson (D). (The district is 22 percent black, and so is Lawson.)

Boyd's Panhandle district is one of more than four dozen currently held by a Democrat that went for Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in 2008; McCain beat President Obama 54 percent to 45 percent.

4. Wisconsin (and national) Democratic officials are coalescing behind state Sen. Julie Lassa (D) as their nominee to run for the seat of Rep. David Obey (D), who announced last week that he will retire after serving 20 terms in the House.

Lassa, who was elected to the state Assembly in 1998 and the state Senate in a 2003 special election, officially kicked off her bid yesterday.

"There is consensus" on Lassa, according to a senior Wisconsin Democratic Party official. "It was done quickly because we understand the importance of keeping this district," the official added. (President Obama won the district by 14 points in 2008 but the Democratic presidential nominees in 2004 and 2000 carried the seat far more narrowly.)

A bevy of state Democratic legislators has been eyeing the seat in the wake of Obey's announcement, but the state party is eager to sidestep a primary battle. The frontrunner for the GOP nod is Ashland County District Attorney Sean Duffy (R), a former "Real World" star who had already announced his bid against Obey. Duffy raised more than $500,000 for the race as of the end of March.

Duffy spokesperson Matt Seaholm cast Lassa as a party-line Democrat who voted to raise taxes in the last legislative session, but nonetheless welcomed her entry into the race. "I know she's well respected in Madison, and I think she's going to be formidable," Seaholm said.

5. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) is becoming an issue in the final days of the GOP Senate primary between ophthalmologist Rand Paul and Secretary of State Trey Grayson.

At a Monday night debate, Paul equivocated when asked whether he would be voting for McConnell as party leader if elected to the chamber this fall.

"I'd have to know who the opponent is and make a decision at that time," Paul said. Meanwhile, Grayson -- who officially received McConnell's support last week but has long been viewed as the Senator's preferred nominee -- said he'd "proudly" vote for the minority leader should he get elected.

Paul's comments came mere hours after McConnell refused to say that nominating Paul would weaken the party's chances of holding the seat being vacated by Sen. Jim Bunning (R) in the fall.

McConnell, in an interview with the ABC/Washington Post show "Topline", said that a unity rally was already planned for the Saturday after next week's primary, adding: "I think there's an excellent chance that Kentucky will keep this seat in Republican hands and we're going to be there to support the winner."

By Chris Cillizza  |  May 11, 2010; 6:00 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Assessing the Bob Bennett fallout
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Comments

Texasproud1,

You say that policies forced creditors to lend to unqualified borrowers.

Please give an example of a specific policy that forced lenders to do that.

Thank you.

Posted by: cathyc1 | May 16, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Brigade asks
"You must also have more than your share of ignorant deadbeats. How else to explain Jesse Ventura and Al Franken?"


They both ran against Norm Coleman.

.

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 12, 2010 9:05 AM | Report abuse

Guns being illegal is one thing I LOVE about Viet Nam.

I wish the Second could be repealed here so all those RKBA lunatics would try to go up against the cops. After it was all over the national IQ would have gone up about 28 points.

I'm no longer interested in whether or not you're a stealth zouk moniker like doof, Brigade, becasue it no longer makes much difference. You have nothing to contribute here.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 8:36 PM | Report abuse

Jaxas70 wrote,
"How in the world do all of those rote, stupid, vapid empty, meaningless slogans about freedom, liberty, the Constitution, God, guns and guts translate into an actual governing philosopy?"

They're only stupid, vapid empty, and meaningless to useless, bitter, welfare chiselers like you. Move to Cuba. No freedom, no liberty, no (privately owned) guns. Michael Moore says the medical care is fanastic, and Castro could always use another pinko lackey to lick his boots and polish his knob.

Posted by: Brigade | May 11, 2010 8:20 PM | Report abuse

JakeD3 wrote,
"The size of state or benefits has relatively little to do with government debt. It's the conscious decision to add expenditures without a corresponding drop in expenditures or increase in taxation."

You're a fox, Jake.

Posted by: Brigade | May 11, 2010 8:13 PM | Report abuse

Drindl,
"This is a good example of how US taxpayers are routinely suckered by industry into paying for the risk while industry pockets the profits."

Can't argue with you there, Drindl. I'm not even a half-way socialist, so I can't see the logic in privatizing profits and socializing losses. However, I don't think it's so much the taxpayers getting suckered as being sold out by those elected to represent them.

Posted by: Brigade | May 11, 2010 8:11 PM | Report abuse

bsimon1 wrote,
"Here in Minnesota, generally considered a 'high tax' state, we have a very well educated workforce."

You must also have more than your share of ignorant deadbeats. How else to explain Jesse Ventura and Al Franken?

Posted by: Brigade | May 11, 2010 8:07 PM | Report abuse

TexasProud1 wrote at 3:50,
"The D.C. schools are considering to be among the worst in the country, but they have the highest per capita spending in the country. Just because you are throwing money at it doesn't mean it works. The fact that there isn't any merit based pay for teachers is a big problem. If there isn't a way to distinguish between the good and bad teachers, the good teachers will leave and go somewhere else. The teacher's unions have made it nearly impossible to fire incompetant ones, and that does lead some of the better teachers to switch schools to get away from them."

And again at 4:04,
"Best solutions are ones where the individual person takes ownership of the situation instead of pawning it off on the government to fix it for you. You can't legitimately answer why the Liberal Utopias like California and New Jersey are facing such dire budget problems, or the social welfare nations that make up the European Union are on the verge of complete collapse without setting up a straw man argument about corporate greed. Corporate greed isn't what is causing the meltdown in Europe or in some states in the US. It's ridiculous growth in government spending at a time when the economy is contracting. Only a liberal can justify the way to get out of a budget deficit is to spend more money."

And about Noacoler,
"I think you are completely clueless when it comes to actually solving problems."

Always nice to find someone here who actually knows what he's talking about. And look how quickly he figured out Noacoler!

Posted by: Brigade | May 11, 2010 8:03 PM | Report abuse

Texas, your suggestion that personal responsibility is alien to liberals is not only a caricature, it's a slanderous and contemptible lie. I think one could make a stronger case in the other direction. I'm not willing to discuss such moronic ideas with you.

As for education and motivation, you're going in circles, so I'm going to make an analogy.

Let's talk about a footrace. The factor that has the strongest influence on who wins the race is how strenuously the racer drills himself. The guy who races every day will almost always beat the guy who goes running once or twice a year.

But if the disciplined runner has to race on a track covered with fallen branches while the other guy gets a smooth track, the slacker is probabaly going to win, and the discplined guy is probably going to end up in the hospital.

I think you've been pursuing this just to make your snarky Reagan-era junk point about conservatives and responsibility. Which is garbage.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 7:53 PM | Report abuse

The primary factor in a successful education is the effort a kid puts in and the accountability of the parents or legal guardian in enforcing the discipline. That fundamentally is what matters. My middle school I went to had been around since the 50s and even the occasional renovations doesn't fix all of the problems. The curiculum provided is also important, but to take the pressure off the kids and blaming it on the situation is just a distraction. When will personal responsibility become a tenant of 'progressive' policy? If you want a policy to help address the situation, allow low-income students to get vouchers to better performing schools. I have no problem with that because one monopoly that needs to be busted right now is the public school. Right now, there is no real competition for students. Schools are about educating the students, not providing more members to the teacher's union. That's a different subject and not worth hijacking the comment section more than it already has been.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | May 11, 2010 6:34 PM | Report abuse

"A new poll conducted for the NRCC shows an unlikely target emerging in Florida.

The previously unreleased poll, which was obtained by The Fix, shows Rep. Allen Boyd (D-Fla.) trailing funeral home director Steve Southerland 52 percent to 37 percent despite the fact that less than one in five voters recognize Southerland's name."

I live in Florida's second district and the anti-Boyd feeling is huge. If the pollsters said would you prefer a ham sandwich over Boyd, it also would probably have gotten over 50%. As another commenter said, I also question the questions asked of respondents. Did they mention any of the other Republicans or Democrat Al Lawson? How about the conservative independent Paul McKain? If under 20% of the respondents knew of Southerland by name, this reinforces the concept that the respondents were voting somewhat blindly AGAINST Boyd as opposed to FOR Southerland.

In another poll conducted by Tallahassee radio station WFLA recently, the respondents could choose from any of several candidates (including Boyd and Southerland). Conservative independent candidate Paul McKain trounced Southerland by nearly 20 points.

This voter is tired of Boyd, but doesn't want more of the same just with a Republican label. McKain has a lot of appeal due to his stated "Principles above party" stance where he values the voters above any party. I've heard both speak and Southerland comes across as a politician, while McKain has a genuineness about him that is undeniable.

Posted by: RPS2 | May 11, 2010 6:01 PM | Report abuse

Texas, see my analysis of The Ped on the McCain page. In only the most recent post she validated my findings.

Posted by: bumblingberry | May 11, 2010 5:47 PM | Report abuse

Texas, my cockatoos make more sense than you.

I acknowledged that student motivation is important. I never disputed that.

You claim that student motivation overpowers all other factors in getting a good education. You're just plain wrong about that.

You can't even make a coherent point without rolling a gutter ball in your zeal to get back to the hate and rage. The same is rue of just about every conservative who posts here.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 5:41 PM | Report abuse

Ped never replies to the truth. the other day I took apart the communist paradise medical system, literacy, economy and more. she replied with juice bar snark, as usual. she knows about 8 or ten sayings that she thinks are so cute:

Israel is racist
God has no email address
birds are smarter than kids
Economics is voodoo

there are about five more she cycles in every once in a while; nothing more to this empty vessel (except Sunday mornings, when she is full).


when she runs out of nasty comments, she insults. you can search high and low and that is all you will ever find.

Posted by: bumblingberry | May 11, 2010 5:23 PM | Report abuse

Noacoler,

I don't know what your problem is, but get over yourself. Your explanation about your Vietnamese friends proves my point. Actually, in the engineering school I attended, most of the top students in my classes were foreign exchange students because they applied themselves more and made A's while the rest of the class was settling for C's. My problem with so-called progressive policies is that they don't achieve what they set out to accomplish. We have significant budget problems in Greece, Portugal, Spain, UK, and their problems are not a revenue problem, but a spending problem. By adding on a new program to try to fix the failing one, it just makes the current problem worse. Bailing out the crooks at AIG, Citigroup, UAW and the Big 3 automakers, we are just enabling the people who screwed up in the first place instead of allowing them to fail and forcing them to reorganize in a business model that is sustaining. The bailouts of Greece is only allowing the government there to continue to do what it has been doing which is what got them into these problems in the first place. The most important tenant of capitalism is the freedom of opportunity to succeed AND fail. Both parties that have gone along with these bailouts are to blame for this, and don't think I, along with other conservatives, have forgiven Bush for pushing these bailouts through. My issue with progressive policies is the lack of accountability for the people who caused these problems in the first place. I've mentioned the problems with the bailouts, but what about the people taking out mortgages they could never afford? Why should we have to bail out people who were being irresponsible in buying more than they can afford? My wife and I live in apartment because we are not in a position yet to buy a house. We are not ENTITLED to a house just because we would want one. We also should be blaming the policies that forced lenders to make loans to high-risk people. We should also hold the creditors who were out to make a quick buck by coming up with the sub-prime mortgage policy. Instead we are throwing billions more at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac because of their political connections on Capitol Hill. Why should I want anymore 'progressive policies' when this is what the last two years have bestowed upon us?

Posted by: TexasProud1 | May 11, 2010 5:16 PM | Report abuse

Notice nobody bothers to strike back at zouk's twisted insults, that's because everyone recognizes that Being Zouk is its own punishment.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 5:15 PM | Report abuse

Norfolk Academy is a semi military boarding high school where little boys are taught shower etiquette and how to overcome daddy's shame.

Being rejected at such a young and impressionable age leaves a mighty scar.

you will notice over time that The Ped never talks about his college education. It is about the only topic that is off limits. how to be an elitist know it all Liberal with a degree in art history from three bears kiddee college? difficult, even for her.

all those Pakis at work with their masters degrees, passing up the white guy (well really more like the bald pastey bozo looking dude). the resentment and anger built up for years. the only solution, run off to a third world country where they understand even less about economics.

Posted by: bumblingberry | May 11, 2010 5:07 PM | Report abuse

Ped took 7 years to graduate community college. He is therefore an expert on downwardly defined deviance, in all of its glamour.

Posted by: bumblingberry
-------------------------------------------
I thought Norfolk State was a university.

Posted by: leapin | May 11, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

Re: lousy teachers, obsolete textbooks
lousy teachers -The progressive creed doesn’t allow for dumping of lousy teachers (see teachers unions). Union supported progressive politicians look the other way. Obsolete textbooks. That would depend on the subject and level. For the basics not so much.

Posted by: leapin | May 11, 2010 4:53 PM | Report abuse

Save it, Texas, you couldn't get back any credibility before the Throne of God. You think that motivation will make up for lousy teachers, obsolete textbooks? A load of bull.

Trust me, I know the strength of motivation in education, most of my friends are Vietnamese, I've seen the kids studying at the dinner table on Saturday night and not under compulsion either. I know better than you what an important factor that is. Their Caucasian classmates would be hanging out at the mall.

But in your idiot zeal to sneer at progressive principles you've dug yourself in too deep to get out.

Kinda funny to read you ranting about education when you misspell a five cent word like "dependent."

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 4:39 PM | Report abuse

Ped took 7 years to graduate community college. He is therefore an expert on downwardly defined deviance, in all of its glamour.

Posted by: bumblingberry | May 11, 2010 4:14 PM | Report abuse

Listening to Oil Spill hearings.

The buzz on the technical blog I follow is that something went wrong when the well was being plugged with cement. Something about using sea water at the wrong time. Methane gas shot up from the well due to the cement setting. Very complicated.

The three parties all share in the responsibility. It's like a ball of string--very hard to tell who did what to whom. And the parties have dummied up, except to point fingers at each other.

The evidence (BOP) is at the bottom of the ocean and the parties may make sure it never makes itself to the surface to be analyzed.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 4:14 PM | Report abuse

So a motivated kid is going to get a good education even if he goes to a school ina building near collapse and with 50-year-old textbooks.

I think we're through with you.

Posted by: Noacoler
-----------------------------------------

Obviously the best education is done in the most modern of settings with latte and pastry available. That’s why old dumps like Harvaaard need to be torn down.

Posted by: leapin | May 11, 2010 4:07 PM | Report abuse

A dirty little secret about education. The level of education depends on the effort a kid is willing to put into it and the level of support his/her family shows in holding the kid accountable. It doesn't matter how much money you throw into a school system, if the kid isn't willing

==

So a motivated kid is going to get a good education even if he goes to a school ina building near collapse and with 50-year-old textbooks.

I think we're through with you.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:56 PM | Report abuse

I think you are completely clueless when it comes to actually solving problems. I think you really think the measure of how to fix something is how much money is thrown at it. YES THE LEVEL OF EDUCATION IS DEPENDANT ON THE LEVEL OF EFFORT HE/SHE PUTS INTO IT. Instead of whining and complaining about inadequacies, you might want to actually come up with solutions outside of spending money we don't have. Best solutions are ones where the individual person takes ownership of the situation instead of pawning it off on the government to fix it for you. You can't legitimately answer why the Liberal Utopias like California and New Jersey are facing such dire budget problems, or the social welfare nations that make up the European Union are on the verge of complete collapse without setting up a straw man argument about corporate greed. Corporate greed isn't what is causing the meltdown in Europe or in some states in the US. It's ridiculous growth in government spending at a time when the economy is contracting. Only a liberal can justify the way to get out of a budget deficit is to spend more money.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | May 11, 2010 4:04 PM | Report abuse

No one can tell you, noa, about a good cheap school. I can, so here goes:

Address: 1401 Avenue E
Location: kitchen table
Teacher: mom
Subjects: English, pretty good
Math, so so
Science, not so much
Textbooks: what?

Well, maybe not really good, but it was really cheap.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 4:01 PM | Report abuse

she would ignore the issue or not directly respond to questions about it if california voters opposed az bill. she probably has her own polls on this too. califonia is heavily democratic with huge hispanic population. she knows what she's doing.

==

There's a name for the the kind of person you're describing, and it isn't "canny politician," it's "liar."

Wow you have done a stellar job of discrediting yourself today. And you say you have kids. I pity them.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 4:00 PM | Report abuse

A dirty little secret about education. The level of education depends on the effort a kid is willing to put into it and the level of support his/her family shows in holding the kid accountable. It doesn't matter how much money you throw into a school system, if the kid isn't willing

==

So a motivated kid is going to get a good education even if he goes to a school ina building near collapse and with 50-year-old textbooks.

I think we're through with you.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:56 PM | Report abuse

May 6, 2010 (5 days ago) Meg Whitman said "I have sympathy for what Arizona is going through and I understand their frustration with the abject failure of the federal government," she said. "But if that law were to come before me, I would oppose it."

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/percent-247639-mail-ballots.html

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 3:56 PM | Report abuse

Looks like "doof" is a little over his head here.

Better mosey back over the redstate, champ, you can brag about how you had the liberals howling in frustration.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:53 PM | Report abuse

whitman is a smart woman. she would ignore the issue or not directly respond to questions about it if california voters opposed az bill. she probably has her own polls on this too. califonia is heavily democratic with huge hispanic population. she knows what she's doing.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 3:50 PM
----------------------------------
So, you lied. There are no polls.

Whitman came out against the law 5 days ago. What the hell are you talking about?

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 3:52 PM | Report abuse

yes, where is there a link to evidence that Calfornians support the AZ law?

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 3:42 PM


proof is in the pudding. whitman is a smart woman. she would ignore the issue or not directly respond to questions about it if california voters opposed az bill. she probably has her own polls on this too. califonia is heavily democratic with huge hispanic population. she knows what she's doing.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

You didn't answer my question, you just used it as a pivot to another dig at unions.

I'm going to presume that you are unable to back up what you say.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:25 PM


my kids grew up in florida. schools were pretty good there. florida doesn't have income tax either. texas has no income tax and i'm sure they have many good schools too. any examples i give would be meaningless to you.

A dirty little secret about education. The level of education depends on the effort a kid is willing to put into it and the level of support his/her family shows in holding the kid accountable. It doesn't matter how much money you throw into a school system, if the kid isn't willing, who cares what software is available. Coming from a family of teachers, I have heard enough horror stories to know there are limits to how much a teacher can do for a classroom full of kids. The D.C. schools are considering to be among the worst in the country, but they have the highest per capita spending in the country. Just because you are throwing money at it doesn't mean it works. The fact that there isn't any merit based pay for teachers is a big problem. If there isn't a way to distinguish between the good and bad teachers, the good teachers will leave and go somewhere else. The teacher's unions have made it nearly impossible to fire incompetant ones, and that does lead some of the better teachers to switch schools to get away from them.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | May 11, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

Kagan and the Big O are kindred spirits. Through a series of events both have walked the path and reached the pinnacle of the mountain without leaving footprints. In the O’s case it was voting “present” . In Kagan’s case no litigation or judicial decisions to cloud the waters. Both are also children of radical parents. Kagan is just another piece, no not just another piece but a center piece and a more than willing participant , in O’s statist schemes and agenda, and self-glorification.

Posted by: leapin | May 11, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

my kids grew up in florida. schools were pretty good there. florida doesn't have income tax either. texas has no income tax and i'm sure they have many good schools too. any examples i give would be meaningless to you.

==

well you got that last part right.

So you don't really have any data, just an anecdote that the schools were "pretty good." Given your ideology I would venture that "pretty good" means your kids didn't learn much biology or civics. I was looking for some actual, you know, information an' stuff.

And by the way, state income taxes are only one kind. The primary source of school funding is property taxes.

You can't back up anything you say.

Now make another dumbsh*t crack about unions, why don't you.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

@doof,

i said california voters support the law. whitman can read the polls.
---------------------------------
You said there were polls.

Then you cite some guy. That's a poll? Then you link to Debra Saunders...no poll there.

Where are the polls you cite?

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 3:47 PM | Report abuse

@doof,

i said california voters support the law. whitman can read the polls.
-------------------------------------
What is your evidence? I'd like to study it.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 3:31 PM


"Hector Barajas, a former California Republican Party spokesman, said of Democrats, "They'll attend an immigration march and march with you, but on the back end, they'll say they want more agents to deport you. It's become a racket.""

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/05/08/INS81D45GB.DTL


Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

yes, where is there a link to evidence that Calfornians support the AZ law? I know many people -- friends and family there, who think it's atrocious. Ny sister in law, in fact, who is 4th generation Mexican American and conservative, voted Republican until recently, but now she says they have declared war on Latinos, never again. She just registered as a Democrat.

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 3:42 PM | Report abuse

You didn't answer my question, you just used it as a pivot to another dig at unions.

I'm going to presume that you are unable to back up what you say.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:25 PM


my kids grew up in florida. schools were pretty good there. florida doesn't have income tax either. texas has no income tax and i'm sure they have many good schools too. any examples i give would be meaningless to you.


Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 3:35 PM | Report abuse

@doof,

i said california voters support the law. whitman can read the polls.
-------------------------------------
What is your evidence? I'd like to study it.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

And in unrelated news, Sen. Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma (one of the most "socially conservative" states in the union) is the first to come out in opposition to Elena Kagan's nomination to the Supreme Court.

Bet you never saw that coming, huh?

He "remains concerned." Yeah I bet he does.

You don't need to read his statement, you can probably pretty much guess what he said. Pig goes in on top and all you have to do to make sausage is turn the crank.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:29 PM | Report abuse

If I were you, I wouldn't count on Meg Whitman to lay down on the railraod tracks to support AZ undoc law.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 3:09 PM


i said california voters support the law. whitman can read the polls.

when she gets elected, she's just another john mccain. republicans know that. still better than brown though.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 3:28 PM | Report abuse

You didn't answer my question, you just used it as a pivot to another dig at unions.

I'm going to presume that you are unable to back up what you say.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:25 PM | Report abuse

How do you get good school on the cheap?

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:10 PM


by not handing the money to teachers unions. they're the problem here in california.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 3:22 PM | Report abuse

I've worked there for half the last 21 years, and the difference between 1989 and now is simply staggering. It's more repressive than IBM ever was. I think Ballmer's administrative model is the Kremlin.

Posted by: Noacoler
---------------------------------------
You just like to talk neocom but not live it? Kremlin should be like paradise to statists.

Posted by: leapin | May 11, 2010 3:19 PM | Report abuse

many places have good schools without high taxes.

==

name three such "places" please. How do you get good school on the cheap?

Are you an employer? Why would anyone not worth billions be against labor organization? Why is it that you guys side, against your own self-interest, with the wealthy?

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 3:10 PM | Report abuse

@doof,

Did you see this:

Republican National Hispanic Assembly of California endorses Meg Whitman

May 04, 2010

CUPERTINO - Meg Whitman today announced the endorsement of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly of California...The Republican National Hispanic Assembly is the only Hispanic Republican organization chartered by the Republican National Committee.

http://www.megwhitman.com/story/2721/republican-national-hispanic-assembly-of-california-endorses-meg-whitman.html
-----------------------------
Maybe this explains why she for it/against it/for it etc. If I were you, I wouldn't count on Meg Whitman to lay down on the railraod tracks to support AZ undoc law.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 3:09 PM | Report abuse

If you want to make the point that California likes AZ undoc law, make that point.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 2:52 PM

that's what i'm saying. many posts the last few days on this blog said the law would hurt republicans. doesn't seem to hurt them in california even with all the democrats here.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 3:05 PM | Report abuse

I support a tax structure that is designed to fund good schools

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 2:49 PM

california has that design but it's all diverted to the unions. schools are a joke here. waste of money. many places have good schools without high taxes.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 2:57 PM | Report abuse

In March, Meg Whitman was for "comprehensive immigration reform".

In April, Meg Whitman says she against the AZ undoc law.

In May, Meg Whitman says she'll be tough on illegals.

In June, Meg Whitman says [fill in the blank].

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 2:14 PM

her new commercial said she opposes sanctuary cities. add that for june. you sound like steve poizner.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 2:40 PM
---------------------------------
May 6, 2010 (5 days ago) Meg Whitman said "I have sympathy for what Arizona is going through and I understand their frustration with the abject failure of the federal government," she said. "But if that law were to come before me, I would oppose it."

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/percent-247639-mail-ballots.html

If you want to make the point that California likes AZ undoc law, make that point. But, you are on the wrong track if you use Meg Whitman as some kind of authority on that issue. She's on every side of the issue.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 2:52 PM | Report abuse

"In June, Meg Whitman says [fill in the blank]."


My entry:

In June, Meg Whitman says "Where did I go wrong?"

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 2:51 PM | Report abuse

TexasProud writes
"It's the same concept most people have when people are looking at taking a new job in a different city. They look at the school districts, property taxes, cost of living. It is exactly the same with companies."

Exactly. The tax rate is only one component. Around here, some people value a particular suburb (Edina) that is known for having the best schools, albeit with higher property values (i.e. its expensive to buy in) and high property taxes (its expensive to stay). But they think they get what they pay for. The folks that don't like those costs and/or don't need or value the schools tend to move farther out of the metro. That's a rational decision to make, and they know that if they need the fire department, it might take 20-30 minutes or more for the volunteers to show up, while us city folk see the FD in about 5.

That's not to say one choice is better than the other, but that those are valid choices. Like I said earlier, I live in a relatively high tax state, where there are good jobs. Applying that to federal tax policy, I support a tax structure that is designed to fund good schools that produce a creative workforce that will be able to solve the problems we face. Growing up in the 70s & 80s, and entering the workforce in the 90s, I've benefitted enormously from the focus our country put on education, particularly in the sciences in the space race of the 50s & 60s. We need to keep that up if we want to continue to enjoy the economic growth we've enjoyed over the last 65 years.

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 2:49 PM | Report abuse

In March, Meg Whitman was for "comprehensive immigration reform".

In April, Meg Whitman says she against the AZ undoc law.

In May, Meg Whitman says she'll be tough on illegals.

In June, Meg Whitman says [fill in the blank].

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 2:14 PM

her new commercial said she opposes sanctuary cities. add that for june. you sound like steve poizner.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 2:40 PM | Report abuse

TexasProud, you're assigning a pretty high influence to tax policy when it comes to creating jobs. While tax rates can be a variable, there are other variables as well. Here in Minnesota, generally considered a 'high tax' state, we have a very well educated workforce. Companies that require an educated workforce tend to locate here - or are founded here in the first place - precisely because people with an education can add a lot of value, if your business is structured to take advantage of those skills. The kinds of businesses that value tax policy higher than quality of workforce tend to be the kind that don't require employees with special skills - on other words, they're the kinds of employers who pay low wages, and will pull up & move as soon as someone else gives them a better offer. Put another way, having an uneducated population & low tax rates is a race to the bottom. But when you educate your residents, you can attract higher-paying jobs that raise the quality of life for residents. I don't know about you, but working a minimum-wage job for an employer that'll move to China if they can make more money doing so isn't my idea of a good long term career choice. It isn't a good one to base a state's economy on either.

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 1:59 PM | Report abuse

I appreciate your point, but taxes do play a significant role in the decision of where companies locate. It's the same concept most people have when people are looking at taking a new job in a different city. They look at the school districts, property taxes, cost of living. It is exactly the same with companies. Companies first objective is to be profitable, not to employ workers. If a company will be more profitable relocating to a state like Texas which doesn't have a state income tax, then they will do it. The professional jobs will be filled by the educated work force qualified for these positions. In a time of large budget deficits, the government needs to do what everyone else has to do in lean times, and that is cut back. Every budget cut will offend somebody, but the reality is our gov't is broke. We all know how to make financial sacrifices when times are tight, so should the government. We all need to stop expecting the government to fix all of our problems. This mentality is what has driven Greece off the economic cliff, and is why California has become what it is today.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | May 11, 2010 2:37 PM | Report abuse

All this talk of the relationship between taxes and revenue is depressing, underscoring just how bad education is getting in America. Don't you guys have any numerical sense? Yeah, I get it, it's an article of right-wing faith that taxation is bad for the economy and that lower taxes free up money for investment. There's a kernel of truth to that, but the wingnuts seem to believe that cutting taxes to zero will raise infinite revenue. There is no evidence to support the assertion, and plent of evidence the other way.

Suppose you cut taxes in half. If the taxed income remains the same, revenues have been cut in half too. I hope you wingnuts agree so far, otherwise please stop reading now.

Now: to make up the lost revenue, the economy has to grow. How much? Taxes were cut 50%, but the economy has to grow 100%, which means that the extra investment has to REALLY pay off. It doesn't. The ratio is different.

Cut taxes by 75% and the economy has to grow not by 75% but by 300%. Get it?

Only incremental changes, essentially redistributive changes, can benefit revenue.

If you look at history (real history, not that crap and falsehood coming out of Heritage and Club for Growth, but the actual figures) you'll see that in times of high taxation and firm regulation the country does best. This is reality. If you want to believe your ideology and ignore the facts then you have no business writing about policy, you should be on a street corner with a sign and yelling at people.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 2:37 PM | Report abuse

guess you think bill gates hires only dummies. washington state has no income tax.

==

Bill Gates isn't CEO of Microsoft anymore, the CEO is a crude coarse idiot named Steve Ballmer, a loudmouth who reads books by other CEOs and is driving the company into obsolescence. Ever seen a Zune?

And they may not hire a lot of dummies but they do hire a lot of drones, and creativity is now officially deprecated there in favor of uniformity, adherence to standards that are counterproductive and worthless.

I've worked there for half the last 21 years, and the difference between 1989 and now is simply staggering. It's more repressive than IBM ever was. I think Ballmer's administrative model is the Kremlin.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 2:25 PM | Report abuse

heard another meg whitman commercial on the radio this morning here in california. in a recent debate with her republican opponent she said she didn't agree with the arizona immigration law. in her new commercial she doesn't mention the law but bends over backwards saying she will be tough on illegals. guess all the support for the arizona law here in california changed her mind. will jerry brown change his mind?

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 9:44 AM
----------------------------------------
In February, Meg Whitman said she opposed Proposition 187, the 1994 ballot measure aimed at curbing public services for illegal immigrants.

In March, Meg Whitman was for "comprehensive immigration reform".

In April, Meg Whitman says she against the AZ undoc law.

In May, Meg Whitman says she'll be tough on illegals.

In June, Meg Whitman says [fill in the blank].

Posted by: 12BarBlues | May 11, 2010 2:14 PM | Report abuse

Here in Minnesota, generally considered a 'high tax' state, we have a very well educated workforce...The kinds of businesses that value tax policy higher than quality of workforce tend to be the kind that don't require employees with special skills

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 1:59 PM

guess you think bill gates hires only dummies. washington state has no income tax.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

TexasProud, you're assigning a pretty high influence to tax policy when it comes to creating jobs. While tax rates can be a variable, there are other variables as well. Here in Minnesota, generally considered a 'high tax' state, we have a very well educated workforce. Companies that require an educated workforce tend to locate here - or are founded here in the first place - precisely because people with an education can add a lot of value, if your business is structured to take advantage of those skills. The kinds of businesses that value tax policy higher than quality of workforce tend to be the kind that don't require employees with special skills - on other words, they're the kinds of employers who pay low wages, and will pull up & move as soon as someone else gives them a better offer. Put another way, having an uneducated population & low tax rates is a race to the bottom. But when you educate your residents, you can attract higher-paying jobs that raise the quality of life for residents. I don't know about you, but working a minimum-wage job for an employer that'll move to China if they can make more money doing so isn't my idea of a good long term career choice. It isn't a good one to base a state's economy on either.

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 1:59 PM | Report abuse

mark,

Lassa's SSD and the CD actually have very little overlap. She's from Stevens Point, which is near the northern edge of her SSD, and which is in the southern tip of the CD. Wausau, Rhinelander, Chippewa Falls, and everything stretching up to the northwestern border of the state is unfamiliar ground to Lassa politically speaking. She may know the territory a little bit, but people there will be about as familiar with her name as with Duffy's in most parts of the CD. Lassa gets a head start in Steven's Point and Wisconsin Rapids, but everywhere else is outside her SSD.

The politics of that part of Wisconsin is a bit odd. It's very conservative in many ways, but like you say, there is a strong German immigrant element, along with a strong Scandinavian immigrant element, from which they inherit a pretty strong progressive, liberal heritage. How much Lassa can capitalize on that versus how much Duffy can capitalize on the anti-incumbent sentiment and shift toward Republicans is up for grabs.

Posted by: blert | May 11, 2010 1:22 PM | Report abuse

drindl – While you are still in your unemployable stage and still have your safety net and time, please read up on the simple concept that corporations don’t pay taxes. It’s simple to understand that the expense of taxes can be passed on to consumers in proportion to the need of the consumer for the good or service being provided.

Posted by: leapin | May 11, 2010 1:10 PM | Report abuse

"I know the 'evil rich people' are cheating you out of the tax revenue you feel you are entitled to, but here's the reality of it: for the most part, they do pay their taxes,"

By and large, mostly they don't. The very wealthy, able to afford tax planning, tax shelters, and a million slippery schemes to avoid taxes, pay a far smaller proportion of their income in taxes than the middle class does -- the dirty little secret. As do corporations. But you've been brainwashed into beleive that the wealthy in this country are somehow your generous benefactors. You are deluded.

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 1:05 PM | Report abuse

"The amazing thing about Rand Paul's willingness to throw McConnell overboard in favor of a right-winger like DeMint is that his motivation doesn't appear to be retribution for McConnell's endorsement of Grayson. Rather, Rand Paul actually thinks McConnell is too liberal. So he's open to supporting Jim DeMint for Senate Republican Leader, even though Mitch McConnell represents Kentucky and as the Senate Republican Leader can deliver more for the state than Jim DeMint ever could.

It's not just the Senate Leadership race -- Rand Paul's position against earmarks for his own state is another example of teabagging extremism. Even Ron Paul (Rand's father) requests earmarks for his district in Texas. As long as there is earmarking, Ron Paul thinks his district should get its share. But not his son, who represents such a pure brand of teabaggism that he'd happily throw his state overboard to stay faithful to his hard-line ideology.

Kentucky Republicans choose a nominee next Tuesday, and all signs point to a victory by Rand Paul. If he does win, the GOP nominee for Senate in Kentucky will be a more conservative version of Ron Paul, a hardliner's hardliner, without even the faintest scent of pragmatism. The tea party crowd will be thrilled, but for the GOP, a Rand Paul victory will represent teabaggism run amok, not only giving the Democratic Party a much better shot at winning the seat, but serving as a symbol of the Republican Party's turn towards the far-right fringe."

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 1:01 PM | Report abuse

"You can't continue raising taxes and expect revenues to continue to increase alongside it."

Revenues increase as you raise taxes. Is it simple math you don't understand?

Increasing taxes does not result in the same increase in revenue. Have you not paid attention to what happened in New Jersey? The millionaire's tax was supposed to raise $700 million and instead it cost them money because the wealthy moved out of state. It is just common sense. The wealthier you are, the more flexibility you have in where you live. It's why companies are leaving CA and setting up shop in AZ. I know the 'evil rich people' are cheating you out of the tax revenue you feel you are entitled to, but here's the reality of it: for the most part, they do pay their taxes, but the more burdens you add, the less they are going to spend on new hires, which means less jobs. It's why we shouldn't just expect but demand that members of congress and our commander-in-chief have spent some time in the private sector having worked a real job so that they have a clue what actually works and doesn't work in our economy instead of lifetime bureaucrats, community organizers, and trustfund babies making things up as they go along

Posted by: TexasProud1 | May 11, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

"You can't continue raising taxes and expect revenues to continue to increase alongside it."
Revenues increase as you raise taxes. Is it simple math you don't understand?
Posted by: drindl
-----------------------------------------
Since you indicate that you understand simple math then you do understand that it is mathematically impossible to tax our way out of our financial downfall. You do understand that the only way out is to control progressive spending. But maybe this is a little too simple.

Posted by: leapin | May 11, 2010 12:59 PM | Report abuse

"You can't continue raising taxes and expect revenues to continue to increase alongside it."

Revenues increase as you raise taxes. Is it simple math you don't understand?

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 12:49 PM | Report abuse

Stupid quips like that are for third graders.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 12:40 PM

that's why i directed it at you.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 12:45 PM | Report abuse

In a recent commencement address Barry bemoans current technology, pretending that he doesn’t know how to operate or use it. Another lie as he clutches his BlackBerry like an infant clutches his formula bottle. His campaign made extensive use of technology and mocked his opponent for lack of such sophistication. He also indicates that there is “too much information” available through the Internet and the like, much that he considers “untrue”. Of course this all leads to the need for Barry and his henchmen to control information in this country in good measure by controlling that great “public utility” the internet. No statist here.

Posted by: leapin | May 11, 2010 12:41 PM | Report abuse

Here's a newsflash for my liberal counterparts. You can't continue raising taxes and expect revenues to continue to increase alongside it. You also can't subsidize a lifestyle where you retire at 50 and have your retirement subsidized by the government, a guaranteed lifetime employment regardless of economic conditions, and now that the EU has mandated that vacation is a human right and you should have a trip paid for by the taxpayers if you can't afford one yourself, you have a recipe for disaster. I get it makes you feel warm and fuzzy about, what in your mind is, taking care of someone, but you can't afford it. None of this is sustainable. You can get on your banter about the excesses of Wall Street, and I am with you on that. You want to punish the companies that took TARP funds, I am with you 100%. I am against all of these bailouts, including the auto industry giveaway to the unions that is at least partially responsible for the industry's demise in the first place. Yes, unlike Europe, we don't (at least not yet) have a government run health care, we do have to work 40 hour weeks, and we are not guaranteed 6 weeks of vacation. And yet, we have had consistently a much lower unemployment rate, and continue to be the one country people want to emulate. I don't want to emulate Europe in any way. Their business model has already driven their continent to the point that several of their countries have debt they can't afford, and the philosophy they use is what is is driving states like California and New Jersey into the ground stateside. Yeah it might sound cold and 'mean-spirited' but learn to live within your means. Lose the sense of entitlement and actually contribute something

Posted by: TexasProud1 | May 11, 2010 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Shut up doof, go play with your poo. Stupid quips like that are for third graders.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Problem is the direction of time's arrow is forward.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 11:38 AM

tell the democrats. the direction of their arrow is straight down.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 12:35 PM | Report abuse

This is a good example of how US taxpayers are routinely suckered by industry into paying for the risk while industry pockets the profits. You want lower taxes, vote for more regulation of industry:

“As hopes dim for containing the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico anytime soon” after a giant containment dome failed, the cost of cleaning up the spill will continue to rise.

BP is financially responsible for the disaster, and President Obama wants to raise the cap on what the company is liable for, as cleanup costs have already surpassed the current limit. BP said yesterday that it had already spent $350 million on the spill response, and the company’s stock has taken a big hit, but the “behemoth” company will almost certainly survive the disaster with little long term damage.

BP’s daily profits dwarf the daily cost of spill response, and at the current rate, the company could cover the entire cost of cleanup thus far in just under four days of profits:

On Monday, BP said it spent $350 million in the first 20 days of the spill response, about $17.5 million a day. It has paid 295 of the 4,700 claims received, for a total of $3.5 million. By contrast, in the first quarter of the year, the London-based oil giant’s profits averaged $93 million a day.

The amount of oil leaking into the Gulf of Mexico has been estimated at 5,000 to 25,000 barrels a day. In the first quarter, BP produced 2.5 million barrels of crude oil a day worldwide — and it received $71.86 for every barrel.

At $93 million a day in profits, BP makes $350 million in about 3.8 days. The Washington Post noted that Exxon, through a decision by the Supreme Court, was able to pay only $507.5 million of the original $5 billion in punitive damages that it had been assessed for the 1989 Valdez disaster."

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 12:25 PM | Report abuse

Texas Proud sends a surprising shout out to the social democracies of Germany and Canada. The size of state or benefits has relatively little to do with government debt. It's the conscious decision to add expenditures without a corresponding drop in expenditures or increase in taxation.

Posted by: JakeD3 | May 11, 2010 12:23 PM | Report abuse

Gee if being a businessman has such political appeal why isn't the Goldman Sachs guy running for president?

If I put on a suit and start talking nonsense about multiples of 5% can I have the job? Maybe I should learn to knot a tie!

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 12:18 PM | Report abuse

TexasProud1, I wonder if the anti-tax conservatives on this blog are ready to share the blame. There is no doubt in my mind that a low tax welfare state is an anomaly and an invitation to long term fiscal disaster, which is now upon the weaker Euro states. However, some of the strong: Germany and the Nordic countries - perhaps the Netherlands and Switzerland, too - bit the bullet on high taxes and then held high spending within revenues.

In the USA and GB, both parties spend big on SOME ITEMS but not OTHERS, while neither party wants to be caught raising taxes. I think if the Simpson-Bowles initiative results in a 14/18 report we best take it seriously - both parties, and independents, as well.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | May 11, 2010 12:17 PM | Report abuse

I see the nits are being picked thoroughly. Welcome to the Fix, Aaron & Felicia.

Posted by: JakeD3 | May 11, 2010 12:16 PM | Report abuse

By The Associated Press
May 11, 2010, 9:58AM
PITTSBURGH — A federal bankruptcy judge has approved the sale of a shuttered southwestern Pennsylvania mine to the owner of the mine where an explosion killed more than two dozen miners last month. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Jeffery Deller on Monday approved the sale of the nearly 1,300-acre Mathies Mine in Union Township, Washington County, to Massey Energy. Massey will acquire the mine from bankrupt Mon View Mining Co.

Deller said the sale appears to be in the best interest of Bethel Park-based Mon View and will hopefully lead to more jobs in southwestern Pennsylvania.

Massey owns the Upper Big Branch mine in Montcoal, W.Va. where an April 5 explosion killed 29 miners.


With Massey in charge they won't be union jobs and there will be no one looking after the working man's welfare. But Tim Burns thinks that's just great.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | May 11, 2010 12:15 PM | Report abuse

The financial crisis in Europe can be directly traced back to the unregulated activities of the US financial sector.

This is why we need good federal government. If we can afford to pay for wars to help oil companies profit, like Iraq, we can afford FOOD SAFETY.

(CNN) -- More romaine lettuce has been recalled amid an investigation into an outbreak of food-borne illness that has sickened at least 19 people in three states.

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 12:14 PM | Report abuse

"The country has been strong for 230 yars without crazy left-wing values."

The founding fathers would by and large be considered liberals today. Try reading some actual history.

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 12:11 PM | Report abuse

The country has been strong for 230 yars without crazy left-wing values.
Posted by: 37thand0street | May 11, 2010 11:59 AM

Read your history books, 37th. The "crazy left-wing values" of people like Jefferson, Franklin, Franklin and Theodore Roosevelt, Susan B. Anthony, Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King Jr are what have made this country great.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | May 11, 2010 12:10 PM | Report abuse

Wrong, 37.

You can thank left wing values that people don't have to work 70 hour weeks and done get maimed and poisoned in the workplace.

Not that you would know anything about having a job, burnout.

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

And Meg Whitman is cratering in California, even after all the money she spent. Brown will be the next governor. He's ahead of her in the polls without lifting a finger.

"Not long ago Meg Whitman had such a huge lead – 50 points – over Steve Poizner for the GOP nomination for governor, many folks thought the race was over and started sizing up her chances against the Democrats’ Jerry Brown.


Well, this week ABC’s SurveyUSA poll shows that Poizner is now 2 points behind her – 39 percent to 37 percent."

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 12:08 PM | Report abuse

I wonder if the liberal commentators who pine for more government involvement are ready for their side to take the blame for the budget crisis in Europe where the liberal/socialist welfare state has made the Greek debt insolvent and is about to do the same in Spain, Portugal, and others.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | May 11, 2010 12:05 PM | Report abuse

Noacoler and drinl


The EXACT OPPOSITE is true - the liberals are trying to make this country into something that the country is not.

First, you cite percentage of minorities - however in the early 1900s the percentage of immigrants was much HIGHER - and different ethnic groups were considered minorities.

The liberals are trying to INTIMIDATE - HARASS and BULLY people into agreeing with their liberal value system - the liberals are doing it.

The country has been strong for 230 yars without crazy left-wing values.

The liberals have taken to mock the old - the white men - the white race - and somehow this justifies their racist philosophy - and convinces them that they are right. Well, they aren't.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | May 11, 2010 11:59 AM | Report abuse

"Both Specter and Sestak poll similarly against Toomey, but the bad news is that they both poll about ten points behind Toomey. It may not matter which one of them wins the Democratic nomination"

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/chris-weigant/democratic-primary-overvi_b_571058.html

good start. if obama goes there, the eventual democratic candidate should poll 20 points behind toomey.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

"Problem is the direction of time's arrow is forward. We can't go back to 1950 or to 1776, so grow up and learn to deal with reality, in the present. The year is 2010, the president is black, the country is half brown, the natural world is in peril, and we can't deal with all our threats by sending troops. Grow up and stop pining for some Leave It To Beaver time that never was."

good posts, Noa and Margaret. And you're right, all the R's 'platforms' are the same -- as a Maine repubilcan put it, 'wack job pablum.'

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 11:50 AM | Report abuse

Tim Burns has got nothing going for him in this campaign except a lot of corporate and PAC backing. Voters Beware.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | May 11, 2010 11:33 AM


democrats outnumber registered republicans in pa-12 by two to one. critz has the unions backing him and is still fighting to beat burns. you're right when you say voters beware - beware of critz.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 11:48 AM | Report abuse

What the hell is it with all these GOP posters and the fascination with the distant past?  The country was founded on this and that, the Constitution yadda yadda, federalism honk honk honk, the founders intended meep meep meep.

Newsflash: 230 years is a hell of a long time ago, the world and nation have changed a lot since then, and, wait for it, the founders of the nation weren't omniscient nor clairvoyant.  We're no longer a nation of wilderness punctuated by aboriginal tribes, the world now has things like totalitarian governments and nuclear weapons, and going back to some nostalgic time that never was doesn't solve any problems but it sure can create new ones.

Take a look at those pictures from tea bagger rallies.  Beneath the signs with the angry racist slogans what do you see?  White hair.  Lots of white hair.  This isn't a political movement, this is organized alienation, confused old men who can't deal with the fact that the nation isn't as white and simple as if once was.  Nostalgia stirred together with anger.  And like most nostalgia, the memories are sugar-coated.  Yeah in 1950 anyone with a job could buy a house, but you were also likely to be dead before you were 70... a bigot could be regarded as a gentleman, these were deficiency diseases, it was a different world.  

Read what this jerk from Utah has to say, read doof (OK, don't read doof he's a waste of time), it's all the same .. we need to go back, we need to undo, we need to restore.  

Problem is the direction of time's arrow is forward.  We can't go back to 1950 or to 1776, so grow up and learn to deal with reality, in the present.  The year is 2010, the president is black, the country is half brown, the natural world is in peril, and we can't deal with all our threats by sending troops.  Grow up and stop pining for some Leave It To Beaver time that never was.

Gửi từ iPad của tôi

Posted by: Noacoler | May 11, 2010 11:38 AM | Report abuse

Tim Burns in PA's 12th CD needs all the free advertising he can get.

His website agenda is the usually vague pablum served up by marginal Republican candidates:
low taxes (doesn't say what gets cut); more jobs (doesn't say how);
more God (doesn't say how);
no one gettin' your guns away from you (no details about the threat to take them);
less regulation by gov't of private industry (v. bad timing when you consider dead miners in WV and the BP oil spill).


Tim Burns has got nothing going for him in this campaign except a lot of corporate and PAC backing. Voters Beware.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | May 11, 2010 11:33 AM | Report abuse

This is what good federal government is all about -- protecting the safety of citizens:

"As many as 39,000 fewer Americans could get campylobacter and 26,000 fewer could get salmonella poisoning from chicken and turkey under new food safety rules announced Monday by Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack. The bacteria, which can be life-threatening, are two of the most common causes of food-borne illness.

“These standards will have probably the greatest public impact for consumers’ health since anything USDA has adopted in the last 15 years,” says Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director at the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington, D.C."

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 11:31 AM | Report abuse

"Insiders on both sides agree that the public polls are accurate, in as much as they show Rep. Joe Sestak has the momentum moving into the final two weeks of campaigning. So Specter's gone negative, launching an attack on Sestak's Naval career supporters of the former Admiral are calling another Swiftboating."


Someone with no military history attacking an honorable Admiral? This will backfire -- Specter is going to lose bigtime. His desperation is showing.

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

alance


What we are getting is some pockets in which the normal advantages of incumbency are not as strong as they usually are.

You get a well-prepared incumbent - with lots of time to raise money - and time to run commercials and pound their opponents - and the incumbents will still win.

We have a swing right now - but there is a limit to what will happen - and there is a tendency to exaggerate.


The major factor is OBAMA - he came into office as a unknown quantity - little track record but a series of promises that he would be bipartisan - resulting in CENTRIST POLICIES.

Obama broke that pledge really quickly - and people do not like it - if he was upfront about his policies during the election - about being far-left, he would not have been elected. The TRUST has been broken - and Obama is NOT getting it back.

Pretty simple.


Which brings me to my real point - the elections in the last few cycles have become much more nationalized - relative to local. I suppose this has to do with the strategy of the democrats to concentrate on Iraq and Bush - and now Obama is the issue.


Also, perhaps more people are getting their news from the internet, relative to newspapers and local tv - so there is a nationalization of the news sources.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | May 11, 2010 11:22 AM | Report abuse

I see 37 is something else than usual this morning. wish this person would stay -- sounds nearly rational.

"The district is 22 percent black, and so is Lawson."

Good catch. Chris, you know, this is pretty egregious -- you need to proofread!

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 11:19 AM | Report abuse

"The district is 22 percent black, and so is Lawson."

Not the best example of writing, Chris. That makes it sound like Lawson is 22 percent black.

Posted by: Blue02dude | May 11, 2010 10:44 AM

Thank you, Blue02dude. I thought it was just infelicitous but you got to the real flaw.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | May 11, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

BSimon, Mark


It is difficult to imagine how they arrive at 42% urban in WI -7


Maybe those old industrial towns have concentrations of population - which place them over the "urban" treshold. Superior would have to be included - but that is only 27,000 people.

Maybe the consider "urban" by county.

Anyway they do it, 42% is difficult to believe - either it is wrong - or they have some calculation which places a great deal of the population right at the definition.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | May 11, 2010 11:11 AM | Report abuse

doof I never attempt to change the mind of people who live outside reality.

Posted by: bobbywc | May 11, 2010 10:54 AM

i live in california. it's the same as outside reality.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 11:04 AM | Report abuse

jaxas70, do you truly think that limiting the size and scope of the federal government will mean that no one will be governing the nation? You have heard of the 50 states right? Federalism is what our country was founded on. Limited national government to handle defense, coining money, running a post office, conducting foreign policy, controlling the borders, administering public lands, and encouraging and regulating interstate commerce. That is a lot of national concerns to handle but the states gave up their sovereignty to establish a national government to handle those limited areas. The states have handled everything else for over 200 years. I think the FBI is a good idea but it is not an agency mandated by the Constitution like the Navy or the Post Office or the Mint. We should look at all federal agencies (current and proposed) with a critical eye to see if they make sense. Creating a federal bureaucracy for every situation is not the answer. The federal government is a creation of the states and was not intended to swallow its creator. Even the New Deal's most ardent proponents would be amazed at the reach of the federal government today.

Posted by: Childrex | May 11, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

"bb, I think it is emptier than you or I thought"

What you don't see on that map is the plethora of small towns - about every 5 miles on the state highways. Lots of lakes & woods, so lots of cabins / 2nd homes. My family started going up there in the early 40s, when it was a 2 day drive from Chicago. Its rural/empty, but not like Texas empty.

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 10:56 AM | Report abuse

doof I never attempt to change the mind of people who live outside reality. You're need to ignore reality means you will never see reality coming at you.

the Florida poll numbers.

"The poll showed Crist with 38 percent support, compared with 32 percent for Rubio and 19 percent for Meek. Eleven percent were undecided.

Crist will have no reason to vote with the Republicans - he owes the Tea party nothing - the Tea party may just give Obama the 60 votes he needs or more.

My view is we need to encourage the Tea party people - the more they speak the more the middle and left wins

If they did not take themselves so seriously they would be droll

Further, I am no Obama supporter - now he is droll - spineless and whimpy - not an ounce of fight in him which is why the Dems appear to be in trouble

Posted by: bobbywc | May 11, 2010 10:54 AM | Report abuse

Appleton isn't in WI-7. The bigger towns (small cities) are Stevens Point & Wausau. Wikipedia says 42% urban, or about 300K of the 670K population. 'Urban' is a relative term, in this context. From downtown Stevens Point or Wausau, you're amongst farms after a 10 minute drive, or less.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisconsin%27s_7th_congressional_district

Wausau has, for employers, the eponymous insurance company & headquarters for a regional 'big box' building supply company. Stevens Point is paper mill country. Marshfield has a well-respected clinic, call it Mayo Jr.

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 10:50 AM | Report abuse

You're right about that jaxas. Teabaggers taking over would turn this country into a true Idiocracy. All the baggers want is to get elected and cash out.

Here's a funny bit of news:

"Florida Gov. Charlie Crist spent most of 2010 a pitiful figure, falling behind an upstart Tea Party opponent and struggling to remain competitive in a senate primary when only two years before he was a presidential kingmaker and widely viewed as a future vice presidential or even presidential contender. But now he seems to be having if not the last laugh than at least biggest current one.

Another poll is out showing Crist not just ahead in a three-way race for Senate but by a significant margin -- six points over Marco Rubio and 19 points ahead of Democrat Kendrick Meek. And now Sen. Reid's office is calling Crist's office to chat. "

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 10:45 AM | Report abuse

bb, I think it is emptier than you or I thought:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:WI_7th_Congressional_District.png

Posted by: mark_in_austin | May 11, 2010 10:45 AM | Report abuse

"The district is 22 percent black, and so is Lawson."

Not the best example of writing, Chris. That makes it sound like Lawson is 22 percent black.

Posted by: Blue02dude | May 11, 2010 10:44 AM | Report abuse

Spector would just assume kill himself before he ever votes with the very people he blames for his downfall and the downfall of American politics

Posted by: bobbywc | May 11, 2010 10:37 AM


then i guess he'll sit out the rest of his term instead of voting with the democrats who booted him this time or the republicans who booted him last time.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 10:42 AM | Report abuse

Appleton's a hefty sized town, about 70k. There are also a number of other significant sized towns around there such as Oshkosh. [My wife's cousin lives near Appleton.] We're not talking Great Plains empty.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | May 11, 2010 10:38 AM | Report abuse

If anyone understand the damage the feckless Rupublican leaderssip and far right has done to American politics it is Spector - Spector would just assume kill himself before he ever votes with the very people he blames for his downfall and the downfall of American politics

Posted by: bobbywc | May 11, 2010 10:37 AM | Report abuse

Let's face it. The Tea Party proposes to take over the Titanic and sinking it before it has a chance to hit the iceberg!

Posted by: jaxas70 | May 11, 2010 10:24 AM

the community organizer already did that. the tea party will raise it and make it float again.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 10:34 AM | Report abuse

Doof, you have certainly lived up to your blog name, Jim DeMint as majority leader? Good God you people have low standards. DeMint has the look and intellect of an Opossum. He is a media favorite because he can be counted on just like Glenn Beck to say something truly appalling.

But, for the sake of argument, let's suppose that your dream--the rest of the world's nightmare--actually comes true and DeMint and the Tea Party take over American government. Then what? How in the name of Jehovah do they intend to govern this amazingly complex government when you do not believe in governing in the first place? How in the world do all of those rote, stupid, vapid empty, meaningless slogans about freedom, liberty, the Constitution, God, guns and guts translate into an actual governing philosopy?

Let's face it. The Tea Party proposes to take over the Titanic and sinking it before it has a chance to hit the iceberg! Their idea of governing is not to govern at all. Its like a teacher showing up and saying that she has decided to teach by not teaching. Its like an astronaut saying he wants to be an astronaut but he doesn't want to have to go into space. Indeed, it is like the current republican Senate: They want to be Senators but they don't really want to legislate anything.

Posted by: jaxas70 | May 11, 2010 10:24 AM | Report abuse

The teabaggers may be angry, but they are definitely confused:

"Despite protests from Tea Party activists regarding high taxes, a USA Today analysis of federal data has found that “Americans paid their lowest level of taxes last year since Harry Truman’s presidency.” Federal, state, local, property, sales, and other taxes “consumed 9.2% of all personal income in 2009, the lowest rate since 1950.”

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

This is so sad for republicans, who are praying for America to fail:

"When the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced last Friday that the U.S. economy added a better than expected 290,000 jobs in April — “the largest monthly increase in four years” — House Republicans were unsure of how to respond. While Rep. Eric Cantor (R-VA) admitted that “an employment report that shows job growth is always a good thing, period,” Rep. Mike Pence (R-IN) called the report “even more bad news” and House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-OH) first asked “where are the jobs?” before admitting in a later release that job growth is “welcome news.” In an effort to defend the GOP’s crossed wires, Boehner spokesman Michael Steel told Roll Call today that the job growth is happening “despite” the Obama administration’s economic policies:

But what if the jobs picture continues to brighten, with millions of additional jobs added between now and November? Republicans will credit the resiliency of the American economy instead of Democratic policies.

“While positive signs are good news, and we expect our economy will recover, it will be because of the hard work and entrepreneurship of the American people — and despite Washington Democrats’ job-killing agenda of more spending, higher taxes and more regulation,” Boehner spokesman Michael Steel said.

Steel was echoed by Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX), who told Roll Call that “[b]ecause of the policies of this administration and the Democratic Congress, we are having a tepid, almost non-recovery.” Steel and Hensarling’s claims ignore the facts on the ground. Earlier this month, administration officials reported that the stimulus “funded 682,779 jobs in the first quarter,” a number that does not include “jobs created indirectly through companies buying supplies for stimulus projects, people spending their tax cuts, increased unemployment benefits and the like.”

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 10:14 AM | Report abuse

I agree with Andy. Push polls are a complete fraud and should not even be reported.

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 10:11 AM | Report abuse

One can always rely on Chris Cillizza to breathlessly tout an NRCC poll showing a unknown republican leading a well known democrat in Florida. It all goes along with a negative narrative on democrats that Chris is passionately devoted to.

Its an internal NRCC poll Chris!

Posted by: jaxas70 | May 11, 2010 10:08 AM | Report abuse

Now that Bennet has nothing to loose, what prevents him from voting with the Dems to finally get things done.

Posted by: bobbywc | May 11, 2010 9:50 AM

what prevents specter from voting with the republicans when he loses to sestak.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 10:04 AM | Report abuse

blert, if you know, how thoroughly does Lassa's SSD overlap the CD?

Also, I remarked the other day that Obey was probably the most liberal Congressman representing a Big Empty CD in America. If I am correct, there are no cities of more than 25K in that district. How many in Appleton?

So what makes this rural district, with the same ethnic heritage as the TX Hill Country - German immigrants in the 1849-1860 time frame, dairy farms, etc.; so relatively "liberal"?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | May 11, 2010 9:56 AM | Report abuse

The idea that incumbents are in trouble regardless of their political party affiliation is probably a good thing - it is sending a message - BUT THINK

yes the Tea Party people are impacting politics. Independent of the Tea Party people the American people no longer believe Congress acts for the people.

Now that Bennet has nothing to loose, what prevents him from voting with the Dems to finally get things done.

The Tea Party people may end up giving Obama the votes he needs - be careful what you ask for because the result may surprise you.

Posted by: bobbywc | May 11, 2010 9:50 AM | Report abuse

The anti-incumbent mood is far less so on the Dem side. This is not a big problem for us.

President Obama's healthcare plan IS the will of the people -- what we elected him to do.

Sure is a lot of free advertising for Tim Burns here -- 4 paragraphs --but nothing for Critz. Gee what a surprise. What not just use the whole front page of the Post to write him a love note?

Posted by: drindl | May 11, 2010 9:47 AM | Report abuse

"Yes, and how many clips of Al Franken were out there that could (and probably should) have ruined him?"

You have to consider the competition. Coleman lost to Ventura for the governorship, and won the Senate seat after his competitor died in a plane crash. For swing voters it was a real 'none of the above' / lesser of two evils election: go for the raunchy comedian or the smarmy opportunist with his finger in the wind.


Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 9:45 AM | Report abuse

heard another meg whitman commercial on the radio this morning here in california. in a recent debate with her republican opponent she said she didn't agree with the arizona immigration law. in her new commercial she doesn't mention the law but bends over backwards saying she will be tough on illegals. guess all the support for the arizona law here in california changed her mind. will jerry brown change his mind?

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 9:44 AM | Report abuse

I can't believe that Alan Mollohan will lose. He's tough; in 1992, his district and Harley O. Staggers (a famous name in NE West Virginia)'s seats were combined. Mollohan ran a very negative campaign to beat Staggers, though the new 1st had more of the old Mollohan seat - his father represented the district before him, as did Staggers' father in the old 2nd. Don't underestimate him.

As for term limits, if the term limits people couldn't beat George Nethercutt in 2000, after he beat the Speaker of the House in 1994 at least partly based on term limits, then the issue is dead.

Posted by: joeyjoejoe | May 11, 2010 9:44 AM | Report abuse

THE ONE-OFF POLITICAL ATTACK ADS THAT CHANGED EVERYTHING

Democratic PA Rep. Joe Sestak's devastating primary election TV ad, in which party-switcher Arlen Specter proudly declares (twice, in case anyone didn't get it the first time) that he changed parties "to get re-EEEELECTED" -- threatens to nuke Specter's political career...

...a media blast with a radioactive half-life that should carry through to next Tuesday. Sestak needn't run another ad, nor should he. The coldly efficient 30-second spot delivers a pre-emptive strike on par with the Lyndon Johnson "daisy" ad that blew away Barry Goldwater back in '64.

Chris, maybe you could ask readers to nominate their top three picks for greatest political attack ads of the modern media age (that would exclude such gems as "Ma, Ma, where's my Pa? Gone to the White House, ha, ha, ha!"

***

What powers of suasion does the security cabal hold over POTUS and his highest officials that would cause them to abandon long-held principles in favor of the "Be afraid; be very afraid" meme -- a pretext for constitutional and human rights abuses such as THIS:

HOMELAND FUSION CENTERS SILENTLY ASSAULT, IMPAIR 'TARGETED' AMERICANS WITH CELLULAR 'TORTURE TOWER' MICROWAVE RADIO FREQUENCY WEAPON SYSTEM, COMMUNITY VIGILANTISM: VETERAN JOURNO

• Obama administration does nothing to stop Bush-Cheney- spawned electromagnetic torture and subjugation, franchised out to a federal-local fusion center "Gestapo" network, says reporter exposing Homeland "torture towers:"

All of those cell towers you see all over America -- and other nations -- are NOT all for phone calls.

Some of them are TORTURE TOWERS -- part of a nationwide microwave/laser radio frequency "directed energy weapon" system that is being used by operatives of the multi-agency Homeland Security-run "fusion center" network to silently torture, impaiir, and physically and neurologically degrade the functioning and well-being of extrajudicially, unjustly '"targeted" citizens.

And apparently, the genocidal use of this precision-targeted domestic weapon system to attack and harm U.S. citizens is being done WITHOUT THE KNOWLEDGE AND CONSENT OF CONGRESS or high state officials.

Veteran major-market journalist Vic Livingston reports:

http://www.nowpublic.com/world/u-s-silently-tortures-americans-cell-tower-microwaves
http://nowpublic.com/world/gestapo-usa-govt-funded-vigilante-network-terrorizes-america
OR NowPublic.com/scrivener re: "Obama: Take Down Fusion Center Gestapo..."

Posted by: scrivener50 | May 11, 2010 9:40 AM | Report abuse

The Fix writes
"The previously unreleased poll, which was obtained by The Fix, shows Rep. Allen Boyd (D-Fla.) trailing funeral home director Steve Southerland 52 percent to 37 percent despite the fact that less than one in five voters recognize Southerland's name."


Color me skeptical. Do you run these polls by the Post polling guru before mentioning them in your column? I'd want to be reasonably confident in the methodology and perhaps see corroborating data from another source before getting all breathless about another seat being in play.

Posted by: bsimon1 | May 11, 2010 9:40 AM | Report abuse

would love to see jim demint take over mcconnell's position as the republican senate leader. too bad mcconnell is not up for reelection this year. he should go just like bennett in utah.

Posted by: doof | May 11, 2010 9:29 AM | Report abuse

I am not sold on Duffy yet. How many clips of him acting like a complete tool on the Real World do you think are out there for the DNC to mine for a quality commercial?

Posted by: AndyR3

---------------------

Yes, and how many clips of Al Franken were out there that could (and probably should) have ruined him? The point is that Duffy is telegenic and does well in front of the camera. He's got a family now, a regular life and job, and the ability to come across as a genuine person. He made the transition from reality TV to real life years ago, so the transition to politics may not be that hard for him, and Wisconsin Republicans were excited about his candidacy even before Obey retired. Duffy has done well in the early stages of his campaign, and if he continues in this pattern, he is now the prohibitive front runner in the race.

Besides, Lassa has been in state government for years. There will be dirt on her, too. During those years Wisconsin has sunk billions of dollars into the red, and nobody will buy the claim that Lassa didn't have any hand in the poor budgeting and dirty deals that have marked Wisconsin politics in recent years. At the very least, her votes are on record. What's more, when a campaign scandal hit Madison several years back, Lassa was one of the state legislators linked with using state workers and resources to run campaigns per statements from her former aide. Lassa slipped out of punishment in the affair, but at least a few legislators faced jail sentences, and the taint of this may still hang with her as she tries to climb to the next run in politics. She has solid experience at the state level, but given the anti-incumbent mood, even that experience may prove detrimental to Lassa this election.

Posted by: blert | May 11, 2010 9:24 AM | Report abuse

What Chris Cillizza and his colleagues are observing is the collapse of business as usual in American politics. There is a strong anti-incumbent mood sweeping the country.

It is due to many reasons, however, in my judgment it is due to the need for term limits for Members of Congress. People are fed up with so many wild and crazy earmarks. They may not be illegal - but they stink to the high heavens.

The first political party that advocates term limits will have a clean sweep at cleaning up congress.

Posted by: alance | May 11, 2010 9:00 AM | Report abuse

It is rare for an incumbent with more coin to lose but we've seen massive changes whenever the electorate feels congress has failed them. No incumbent is completely safe, with Arlen Spector probably getting knocked off in the primary after his backfired military record attack and no vote for Kagan as Solicitor General. The GOP should pick up some ground but nothing to change majorities. A lot will have to do with a continuing recovery and how strong. Reid courageously brought up health care knowing it would hurt him in the polls (he did try to sandbag it with the tanning tax). Now behind he needs an immigration bill to lock in the 10% hispanic voting block to have a chance. If his opponent keeps shooting herself in the foot with chicken payments though, she will go the way of Hoffman in NY23. DE and IN look good for new GOP blood, IL may have a poll change with the Giannoulis family bank going under. Ensign will lose and I think Crist will win but whom does he caucus with. Primaries will have mainly the hard core, so the Tea Party and hispanic blocks will have influence far beyond their numbers. The general while far less turnout than presidential won't be affected as much by those blocks.

Posted by: jameschirico | May 11, 2010 8:40 AM | Report abuse

CayC wrote>>>Then again, maybe it is just because of his healthcare vote against the will of the People he was sent to represent????

Pres. Obama and Democrats were elected TO PASS needed health care reform. Democratic reps voting "no" on health care reform were voting AGAINST the will of the people that elected them.

Posted by: angie12106 | May 11, 2010 8:37 AM | Report abuse

CC you forgot a few things in your article. Mollohan as top Democrat on the House Ethics Committee was investigated by the FBI several years ago after he failed to disclose real estate holdings and other assets on his Congressional financial disclosure forms, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington listed Mollohan as one of the 15 most corrupt members of Congress, and he refuses to release his income tax returns which likely show his net worth has increased significantly since joining Congress. Then again, maybe it is just because of his healthcare vote against the will of the People he was sent to represent????

Posted by: CayC | May 11, 2010 8:23 AM | Report abuse

Any incumbent should be worried as Americans have finally ralized that they have sold their kids birthright to a propserous life to the Chinese to pay for their pet projects. Disgusting lack of leaders in present Congress are causing many to say out with incumbents. I hope they all go down to defeat. Hoe could we be worse off???

Posted by: cdorbg | May 11, 2010 8:23 AM | Report abuse

I'll have to see if I can find the debate stored on C-SPAN. The California debate broadcast last week was interesting, particularly when it came to guns and the no fly list.

Hope P&P was fun last night. We hit Ceiba for happy hour. They make a killer pisco sour and the apps were great. A bit too much cheese on the shrimp&crab nachos, but the queso fundido and taquitos were terrific.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | May 11, 2010 8:18 AM | Report abuse

CC, I find any 'poll' that was paid for and performed by the NRCC that says a democrat is in "danger" to be highly suspect (ie a puch poll). I mean if they asked the question, "Do you support the incumbent in the US Congress Represenatative Boyd who is partly responsible for the huge debt, or his challenger Southerland who saves puppies from puppy mills on his spare time?" Then that explains the result. I think in the future you should ONLY qoute polls that are done in a truly independent manner or that can be linked to the actual wording of the questions. Boyd will be fine especially since he is already spending money in his district.

I am not sold on Duffy yet. How many clips of him acting like a complete tool on the Real World do you think are out there for the DNC to mine for a quality commercial?

Posted by: AndyR3 | May 11, 2010 7:58 AM | Report abuse

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