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Independence Day for Charlie Crist

1. Florida Gov. Charlie Crist (R) will announce his future political plans today, a decision widely reported -- by the Fix among many others -- to be a stepping-away from the Republican party to run for the Senate this fall as an independent.

Crist, perhaps seeking to preserve his ability to change his mind in the final hours before making an official announcement today at 5 pm in St. Petersburg, denied Wednesday that the die was cast on an independent bid. But, sources familiar with the process insisted he had begun to inform people that he would pursue a third party candidacy.

Those same sources cautioned, however, that Crist is notoriously fickle -- even on major decisions like this one -- and that until he says the words "I am running as an independent" things could still change.

Former state House Speaker Marco Rubio (R), whose rapid rise in polling and fundraising forced Crist's hand, wasted no time in seeking to frame a three-way race in his favor.

"Tomorrow will be the best day of Charlie Crist's new campaign," predicted Rubio consultants Todd Harris and Heath Thompson in a memo circulated to reporters late Wednesday.

As evidence, Harris and Thompson -- both of whom work for Scott Howell & Company -- argued that the current horse race numbers for Crist are artificially high due to the fact he is very well known in the state especially when compared to Rubio and Rep. Kendrick Meek (D). Once both Rubio and Meek get better known statewide Crist will falter, according to Harris and Thompson.

The duo also note that there are a strikingly low number of unaffiliated voters in the state -- under 20 percent -- and that there are simply not enough Democrats and Republicans who will ultimately abandon their party banner to vote for Crist. "Voters from both parties will begin to gravitate back to their respective camps," write Harris and Thompson.

Meek spokesman Adam Sharon declared his boss the "hands down winner" of the expected Crist party switch, noting: "Both of Kendrick's Republican opponents are architects of Florida's failed economy, both favor more tax breaks for the wealthy and corporate special interests as their only economic policy, and both are embroiled in the same income tax evasion scandal."

The fight for what Crist's switch means is on. And how it ultimately plays out to voters over the next days and weeks will be critical in determining just how serious Crist's candidacy as an independent will be.

2. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney will endorse seven Republicans running for office in Illinois today, the latest in a series of state-based 2010 endorsements as he prepares for a return run for president in 2012.

At the statewide level, Romney will back Rep. Mark Kirk's bid for Senate as well as state Sen. Dan Rutherford who is running for the state Treasurer job being vacated by Democratic Senate nominee Alexi Giannoulias.

On the House level, Romney is endorsing 6th district Rep. Peter Roskam and 18th district Rep. Aaron Schock as well as challenger candidates in the 10th, 11th and 14th districts. Romney described the group as having made it a "priority to get our economy moving again and create an environment conducive to job creation".

Illinois is the seventh state where Romney has made 2010 endorsements -- and contributed cash from his Free and Strong America PAC. (The previous six states: Ohio, Missouri, California, Pennsylvania, Hawaii, and Nevada.)

Romney's steady roll-out of endorsements is an exercise in some not-so-subtle muscle-flexing by the former governor. Romney led all potential 2012 Republican candidates in fundraising over the first three months of 2010 and has, without question, the most sophisticated political operation of any of the contenders.

ALSO READ: President Barack Obama mentions -- and hugs! -- Giannoulias at a rally on Wednesday.

3. Seeking to return the focus to Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter (D) after weathering a series of negative ads attacking his Navy credentials in recent days, Rep. Joe Sestak (D) delivered a speech commemorating the one-year anniversary of Specter's party switch on Wednesday.

"Senator Specter's apparent willingness, particularly in an election cycle, to say or do anything for his own political survival -- a willingness to go back on his own positions even as he questions the character of his challengers -- represents what is wrong and broken in Washington," said Sestak.

Sestak's remarks go on -- and on -- to detail his humble roots, his life as a senior Naval officer and his decision to run for Congress in 2006 before returning to Specter's ad and equating it with the attacks on the military credentials of Sen. Max Cleland (D-Ga.) in 2002 and Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) in 2004.

"An attack on the honor of a veteran is a dishonor to every veteran, and to do it for the purpose of one's political advantage discredits our democracy," said Sestak. "It is a disservice to all the people out there who are struggling and are looking for real answers, and real leadership."

Less than three weeks remain before Pennsylvania Democrats head to the polls to choose between Specter and Sestak. Polling puts Specter comfortably ahead although Sestak's paid media campaign has only just begun.

4. Arkansas Democratic Sen. Blanche Lincoln's campaign is up with a new ad that aggressively attacks Lt. Gov. Bill Halter on Social Security, seeking to raise questions in older voters' minds about his commitment to the program.

"Finally Bill Halter tells us where he stands on something," says the narrator in Lincoln's commercial. "Bill Halter wants to raise Social Security taxes and cut benefits for retirees." The ad then turns to Lincoln; "You know where Blanche Lincoln stands," the narrator says. "Blanche Lincoln will never vote to privatize Social Security or cut benefits."

Halter's campaign quickly responded, accusing Lincoln of voting for the very things on which the ad attacks Halter. "This kind of behavior -- trying to cover up her own record by telling lies about Bill Halter -- is just one more reason that we need a change in Washington," said Halter campaign manager Carol Butler.

Social Security is a hot-button issue in politics -- particularly in a state with an aging population. (Arkansas is the 9th oldest state in the country with 14 percent of its population 65 years of age or older.) Older voters are a critical voting bloc in midterm elections as they are the most reliable of all voters in what are typically lower turnout affairs.

Lincoln and Halter square off May 18.

5. The new PostPolitics page has launched! It's our new one-stop shop to check out all of the best political journalism from the Post as well as the top aggregated items from all of your other favorite sites.

Make sure to click on the 2010 electoral map where you can not only see the most competitive House, Senate and governors races but also get fundraising data on the race and historical election numbers as well. (It's a political nerd's dream. Trust us, we know.)

And, stay tuned for some other very cool features to come including a blog network that features the best work from political blogs in the states, live video chats and a soon-to-be-unveiled political podcast.

Bookmark it!

By Chris Cillizza  |  April 29, 2010; 6:00 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  | Tags: Charlie Crist, Kendrick Meek, Marco Rubio, Republican  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Charlie Crist plans to leave GOP, run for Senate as independent
Next: The questions Charlie Crist must answer -- and fast

Comments

94% of African Americans vote Democratic, and the way this crowd is acting an equal percentatge of Hispanics will do the same.
Thats good. Very good.

Posted by: logcabin1836 | April 29, 2010 1:14 PM
-----------------------------------
You are TOTALLY, TOTALLY wrong. It is 96% who vote Democratic.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 29, 2010 5:27 PM | Report abuse

"2) - this might be difficult for you to understand - however - just because the blacks CHOSE to vote ALONG RACIST LINES. That does not make the OTHER PARTY racist."

RNC Chairman Michael Steele disagrees with you...

"For the last 40-plus years we had a 'Southern Strategy' that alienated many minority voters by focusing on the white male vote in the South. Well, guess what happened in 1992, folks, 'Bubba' went back home to the Democratic Party and voted for Bill Clinton."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/22/michael-steele-for-decade_n_547702.html

This whole "Black voters are racist because they voted overwhelmingly for Obama" doesn't explain why they vote 9-1 for Democrats in pretty much every race and have for decades...

Posted by: kreuz_missile | April 29, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

There is clearly an ideological "purge" underway in the GOP. This is a dramatic effort by the Ultra Right Wing of the GOP to drive "moderates" from the Party. I'd be surprised if this doesn't get even bloodier. I see Lindsay Graham; Susan Collins; Olympia Snowe all wondering ... what happened to the Party?
The recent retroregressive Arizona Immigration Law, while understandable to some º by me because of proximity to the Mexican Border, & knowledge of what residents along the border have to deal with ... will drive out more socially oriented Republicans from the Party. Certainly, independents who normally vote Republican may bolt. The Right Wing of American politics has been in some very strange places, over the 50 years I've been aware, politically, but the Tea Baggers (that's a kind word), represent some of the goofiest bunch I've seen. Let's hope that the GOP challenger for Sen. Reid's senate seat is challenged to supply chickens for all her supporters as they flock to doctors' offices between now & election day.
Crist should count his blessings, and look for a seat @ the reconstituted GOP. It's hard to guess how far this kind of madness will go, but if Coryn, who is a shallow, venal man, represents baseline Republicans (as I'm sure he does, & so does Dick Cheney and his blockheaded daughter), then one has to wonder: what exactly WILL the GOP look like in a few years?
Cornyn would most likely support the Arizona Immmigration Bill. I am not at all in favor of legalizing all the illegal immigrants here in the U.S. That must be an Ultra Liberal view of the Democrat Party, & there's no way the Dems should back that plan.
But, some kind of provision should be found to allow those who have been here illegally, to apply for citizenship & get in line for that process to begin.
Right now, the only thing that prevents us from moving towards a multiple party electorate is that the Left seems to be able to work within the Democrat Party. On the other hand, fracture out Libertarians; Tea Baggers; independents who mostly vote Republican; those who are "mainline GOP," and what does the Right look like?
There's no way, if Christ is treated as Coryn & Cheney suggest, that many who support him will feel comfortable with the GOP. One wonders where the breakaway point is for GAY Republicans & BLACK Republicans? Exactly what is their primary reason for remaining with the GOP? They're rich? In either case, that might make sense, although in the case of African-Americans, there might be such a reduced # of A-A's in the GOP that there's a "uniqueness" to any African-American still left in the Party.
Cornyn & Cheney make a great "vetting" team for the GOP.

Posted by: zennheadd | April 29, 2010 1:30 PM | Report abuse

I'm not surprise that Crist would consider running as an Independent and it seems like a good strategy because the Republican Party in FL has turned hard right and against him. So far, they have a bad track record in the state.

Rubio is just capitalizing on it by saying things they want to hear instead of what they don't want to hear which reflects reality(like Sutter @6:31 AM says).

Despite that, Crist will caucus as a Republican if elected like Lieberman did.

Posted by: beeker25 | April 29, 2010 1:28 PM | Report abuse

LOGCABIN


1) check out what the unions are doing in North Carolina - that is not trying to "purify" the democratic party?

2) - this might be difficult for you to understand - however - just because the blacks CHOSE to vote ALONG RACIST LINES.


That does not make the OTHER PARTY racist.


Quite the contrary.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 1:27 PM | Report abuse

Obama and the democrats are NOT putting the breaks on any of this - instead they are fueling the racist incidents -


______________________________

From CBS News

A New York State Senator "says his race-based rant was part of his fight against the "evil of white supremacy."

Brooklyn State Senator Kevin Parker is a well-documented hothead, and on Wednesday he took to the airwaves to unapologetically defend his latest shouting match.

"It's par for the course for what we have to do in Albany – fighting the forces of evil," Senator Parker said.

Parker shockingly identified the "enemies" he's fighting as other senators.

"These long-term, white supremacist, you know, Republican senators," he said. "

____________________________


This is NOT Post-Racial

What we have here is the democrats TRYING TO GET A MONOPOLY on the race issue.


Obama and the democrats want to USE RACE TO ATTACK.


Obama and the democrats want to USE RACE TO DIVIDE.

And then they want to claim they are above it all.


This crap has to stop - IT IS UNAMERICAN.

THE AMERICAN PEOPLE WANT TO STOP THIS - AND IT IS THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY WHICH IS DOING THIS AND DOING NOTHING TO STOP IT.

.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 1:23 PM | Report abuse

The Republican Party is on a Witch Hunt this year attempting to "purify" the party of moderates. I hope Mr. Crist caucuses with the Democrats in the Senate. It would serve the GOP right. The GOP tent is getting smaller and smaller. 94% of African Americans vote Democratic, and the way this crowd is acting an equal percentatge of Hispanics will do the same.
Thats good. Very good.

Posted by: logcabin1836 | April 29, 2010 1:14 PM | Report abuse

Rubio, Crist's Republican Party opponent is opposed to the AZ Immigration Law. Because he is Hispanic and Cuban, Marco Rubio would have to carry his papers wherever he went if this AZ law were Florida law.

Posted by: magnifco1000 | April 29, 2010 1:06 PM | Report abuse

The LEGAL IMMIGRANTS have an obligation to support the laws of this country.


so does the democratic party


So does Obama.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

The Republicans in the Florida Legislature have made Crist's life impossible. Mind you, Florida already has the lowest per pupil public school funding in the nation, and the Republicans sent him a bill (SB 6) to cut it even more. He had to veto. Then they (Republicans) go ballistic when Crist accepts the Stimulus money from Obama. Meanwhile, Florida was looking at laying off thousands of police and firefighters. Charlie Crist has been fighting to save what are already the bottom barrel of public services in Florida. Our Republicans are rabid and in the pockets of big business donors.

Posted by: magnifco1000 | April 29, 2010 12:53 PM | Report abuse

Christ thought he would have no opposition for the Republican nomination. But, suddenly, a strong contestant showed up, Instead of staying and fighting to the end, LIKE A MAN, he quits.

What a coward!!!!

Posted by: tropicalfolk | April 29, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

====

I wonder what you think about Sarah Palin quitting in the middle of her term?

Posted by: mikem1 | April 29, 2010 12:39 PM | Report abuse

I was giving some thought to your statement that independents are only 20% of Florida's electorate.

We have a closed primary system in FL, and many counties are effectively one-party operations, i.e., the outcome of the election is decided in the primary -- there is no opposition in the general election (or only a token opponent). For example, Broward County is overwhelmingly Democratic, while the Panhandle is overwhelmingly Republican.

I live in Broward County, so to have any voice in the selection of County Commissioners, Sheriff, etc. I have to register as a Democrat. Candidates routinely switch parties depending on where there's an opening on the ballot -- we're used to that.

I'm a fiscally conservative small business owner and was raised in a Republican household before moving to FL -- so I'm not unsympathetic to moderate Republican candidates. How many moderate Democrats live in the Panhandle who are registered as Republicans? I think the analysis of a small independent base in FL is skewed by our primary system and schizophrenic geography. There are lot of RINOs and DINOs down here.

Another issue will be race. How many good ol' boy Democrats will have a hard time pulling for Kendrick Meek? Charlie may give them an out, without having to vote Republican. BTW: In a contest between a black, an Hispanic and a rumored-to-be-gay candidate, there will be lots of cross currents in this toilet bowl of politics. Should be fun to watch!!!

A registered Democrat or Republican is not necessarily a rank-and-file member of the party.

Posted by: shavenhaircut | April 29, 2010 12:24 PM | Report abuse

don't let the door hit you in the butt on the way out.

Posted by: infantry11b4faus | April 29, 2010 12:13 PM | Report abuse

bsimon thank you so much.
Fascinating stuff.

Posted by: shrink2 | April 29, 2010 12:04 PM | Report abuse

In the end the issue is the impact the radical right is having on the repubs - be careful what you ask for - if they continue down this path it will only help Indep and Dems to get elected, except is a handful of Congressional districts.

the one thing I know about politics is, facts and reality matter little to the radical voters on both sides.

right now perception plays a big role even for the middle and the perception is a radical element is trying to control the country - this will scare the middle away from Republicans and the leadership knows it and does not know what to do

Posted by: bobbywc | April 29, 2010 11:58 AM | Report abuse

I just find it offensive that Obama's attack machine decided to call half the country RACIST.


And then Obama went off on his statements this past weekend.


This kind of behavior does NOT belong in the presidency - who is supposed to represent ALL the people.

Yea, the president has a right to be the leader of his party, but this is April and it really is WAY OUT OF BOUNDS.

Obama has CREATED A RACIAL ATMOSPHERE IN THIS COUNTRY. Instead of fostering a post-racial tone - Obama has DONE JUST THE OPPOSITE.

What is MOST VILE IS THE DEMOCRATS APPEAR TO SUPPORT THIS.


Obama is the MOST DIVISIVE PRESIDENT SINCE LINCOLN.

Martin Luther King would be appalled - and there is NOTHING here toward a COLORBLIND society.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

Do you remember Joe Lieberman from Connecticut? I don't like Lieberman, but in the last election he was MAN ENOUGH to stay and fight for the Democratic nomination. When he was defeated, he ran as an independent, and won.

Christ thought he would have no opposition for the Republican nomination. But, suddenly, a strong contestant showed up, Instead of staying and fighting to the end, LIKE A MAN, he quits.

What a coward!!!!

Posted by: tropicalfolk | April 29, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

Jaxas - it's funny that Rush is always talking about the 'elites' -- he who smokes the most expensive cigars in the world, plays the most expensive golf courses, spends a fortune on designer clothes, buys the most expensive women [and children in other countries, it is said] is lavish in every way, yet manages to convince his sucker listeners he's just a good ole boy.

Posted by: drindl | April 29, 2010 11:56 AM | Report abuse

If Crist can win as an independent (big if) it will give us independents an out from what has become the party of the insane. I hope he does it.

Posted by: Grandblvd03 | April 29, 2010 11:47 AM | Report abuse

I do wonder if teabaggers will even care that Rubio used their donations to buy stuff for his house and very fancy hotels and first class travel and so forth... they're so gullible. But that boy has a future with the Rs,he really knows how to party.]

it was Lamont in CT.

Posted by: drindl | April 29, 2010 11:46 AM | Report abuse

12BarBlues

No one cares about Rush


The democrats talk about him more than the Republicans

Same goes for Sarah Palin - no one cares.

The democrats talk about her more than the Republicans.


The voters are going to throw the democrats out of power - look what you are doing - the lies and mischaracterizations, the false charges of racism - THIS IS HOW YOU GOVERN ????


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 11:45 AM | Report abuse

@jaxas,

Don't think that I'm arguing with you about the inherent worth of Rush Limbaugh. I think he's a complete jackass. All I'm saying is that, after listening to him for 5 years, I realized that he believes every crazy word he says. I used the word "sincerity" to mean that he believes what he says. When I first listened to him, I suspected he was really joking and simply performing, but over time, I moved more to the side that he's a true believer.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 29, 2010 11:44 AM | Report abuse

John McCain, Bob Bennett, Charlie Crist, Lyndsay Graham, the list of GOP stars being RINOed out of their party is growing. Bob Dole, Ronald Reagan and Papi Bush wouldn't be allowed in the party today. Forget about Gerald Ford or Dwight Eisenhower.

I'm not sure how Republicans expect to win in the long term by alienating Hispanics, attacking gays and driving even the biggest stars out of their party because they don't match the Procrustean bed of Teabagger ideology. I'd venture that only 30 million of us qualify as "Real Americans" in their eyes. The other 270 million will just have to run the country without them.

Posted by: AxelDC | April 29, 2010 11:41 AM | Report abuse

@jaxas,

When I say sincere, I mean that Rush believes what he says. That doesn't mean he won't turn on a dime and then believe the next thing sincerely.

What you are describing is integrity--where the person has some kind of desire to take responsibility for his errors in judgment. I don't think Rush views himself as having any errors in judgment. He is narcissistic.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 29, 2010 11:39 AM | Report abuse

"Crist is going to have some backlash here - nothing like the situation when Lieberman went independent. Again the fundraising is going to tell the tale."

True, in that its nothing like Lieberman. For one, Meek is a more credible candidate than the Repub that faced Lieberman & what's his name. It is also likely, or possible, that Crist's fundraising ability dwindles, if not dries up altogether. However, he already has, what, $7 million banked for the race? So its not as though he's been left high & dry. He also has that bully pulpit thing going on, thanks to his current job.

So... This is far from being a Rubio-Meek race & I'd bet Rubio is as far from being a shoo-in as either opponent. Rubio has to grab some moderates without alienating his base; Rubio's biggest advantage at the moment is the enthusiasm the bagger types have for him. Can he keep them excited while attracting voters from the middle? Color me skeptical. And then there's that pesky investigation going on....

Posted by: bsimon1 | April 29, 2010 11:38 AM | Report abuse

Shrink at 10:34 states:


Mark, even though 37th and zouk street thread jack all day every day, we probably shouldn't.


_________________________________________


OK - Here we have some progress - the liberals are "thread-jacking" all day, every day.

Then when the response comes, the attitude is "the other side is doing something wrong."

The liberal posting on this blog FAR EXCEEDS anything the conservatives do - it is that simple.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 11:37 AM | Report abuse

Jaxas wrote: Unless he can come up with a slick way (and he is very slick) to frame it as: "Our elites are better than their elites."
-------------------------------------
The clever way for Rush to accomplish that

1. conservative elites are better and
2. Rush is the leading conservative elite

is the redefine an intellectual as having Rush's personality and education. The new elites will be hyperactive, impulsive, emotional, angry, hypercritical, irrational, uneducated, and narcissistic and be named Rush Limbaugh.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 29, 2010 11:34 AM | Report abuse

jaxas70


First of all, you are bringing up an issue which I have not commented on - then you are characterizing my position.


Then you are criticizing that fantasy you have.

ANYWAY - the Court case which I believe you are talking about Citizens United dealt ONLY with corporate contributions going toward speech.

I would say that ALL of Hillary's contribution were ALL personal contributions - because they were all federal elections.


So, what you are saying does NOT apply to anything I said.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 11:34 AM | Report abuse

12BarBlues, the word "sincere" or "sincerity" conjures up a number of faces for me--Daniel Patrick Moynihan, President Obama, Pope John Paul, Billy Graham. But Rush Limbaugh? You believe that sour oaf is sincere? Even he doesn't cop to that. He admits that he is most bitterly partisan.

Look. Sincerity is a rare commodity not generally found in politicians but in punditry, it is a fatal foible. Are you going to sit there and tell me that if suddenly, this economy turns around and starts to boom and the unemployment rate drops 5% in three months, and the Taliban sues for peace and Netanyahou and Abbas reach an accord and praise President Obama for his efforts and all of our troops come home form Iraq and Afghanistan. and the President solve the immigration crisis and the economy grows at 8%, that Limbaugh is going to say to his audience: "I was wrong about this man."? Do you see him doing that? Now that would be real sincerity.

Posted by: jaxas70 | April 29, 2010 11:32 AM | Report abuse

Pretty disgusting attack by Specter on Joe Sestak's military service record. Sestak rose to the rank of 2-Star Admiral (0-8), a rank that only about .14% of Naval officers reach. Guess Mr. Specter is annoyed that Sestak won't drop out and he is starting to feel the heat. Bet he regrets fleeing his party, now that the Repubs prospects have temporarily turned around. What a fraud.

Posted by: habari2 | April 29, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

shrink, this link takes you to a blog post announcing round 2 funding (for $30 mil) for the company. A link at the end takes you to an article on the technology:

http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/energy/25106/

Posted by: bsimon1 | April 29, 2010 11:30 AM | Report abuse

12BarBlues


It is completely irrational to believe that I enjoy you talking about me.


That goes directly to your self-importance.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

President Obama cried tears of joy and prepared to offer a small burnt goat to Baal yesterday when he heard Crist will run as an independent in the upcoming Florida US Senate race. Obama was reported to have declared " Why have you forsaken me oh Baal?" when he had heard the polls three weeks before Christ's announcement that showed Rubio the Conservative Republican leading Crist and all possible Democrat challengers by significant margins. Now he rejoices.

Posted by: msmithnv | April 29, 2010 11:26 AM | Report abuse

Crist is going to have some backlash here - nothing like the situation when Lieberman went independent. Again the fundraising is going to tell the tale.


I am actually sick of the Florida race.

The only thing I can say is this: is the Florida race a microcosm of how the whole political system in the country is going ??

The democrats have a split too - the 2008 primary had liberal/moderate fissures all over it. And the liberals in Congress just made election prospects for its moderates really difficult this year.

The whole thing is a mess.

These are difficult time - we need smaller government - the trade deals have not worked the way anyone thought - there is much more structural unemployment - and too much concentration of wealth on Wall Street - which contributes to the bubbles.

Meanwhile - instead of lower taxes in that environment, the liberals want massively larger government - a completely unrealistic desire.

There isn't much room there for agreement.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 11:21 AM | Report abuse

It's kind of amusing. Rush Limbaugh thinks of himself as Buckley's successor and in fact, put out feelers to see if Buckley's son would allow him to give the eulogy at Buckley's funeral.

Needless to say, the self-invitation was declined.

Posted by: Bondosan | April 29, 2010 11:07 AM
-----------------------------------
Bwahahaha!!!!!!!!!!

I didn't know that, but I'm not a BIT surprised. Rush is like a shopkeeper who thinks he could run Apple better than Steve Jobs, if Jobs would just do the decent thing and step aside.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 29, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

Wow -- did you read that post about secret torture with microwaves? Talk about off the rails and crashed into crazy town. Why not post the email rumor about the FEMA concentration camps, ZOG, the One World Government, and the Protocols of the Elders of Zion while you are spewing looney tune nonsense?

Posted by: John1263 | April 29, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

@jaxas,

I listened to conservative talk radio for about 5 years, Limbaugh, Hannity and Levin. Limbaugh is in a class by himself, and I don't just mean financially. I think he is sincere. He sees himself as the only logical kingmaker and his ideas as the only good ideas. Like all narcissistic people, he is uninterested in anyone else's ideas and oblivious to any inconsistencies in his own ideas. He's smart in a shrewd way, but is practically uneducated and since he respects no one, doesn't learn from others.

I don't see Hannity or Levin that way at all. Both seem sincere. Levin clearly is the smarter of the two, but both of them seem capable of refining their views. In the bell curve of normalcy, these guys are somewhere in the middle. Limbaugh is out a couple deviations.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 29, 2010 11:14 AM | Report abuse

Crist is too good for the GOP. I left that (R) disaster back in '05, what took Crist so long?

Posted by: hoser3 | April 29, 2010 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Maybe Willard Mitt Romney is consulting with his Guatemalan gardner.

Maybe Barbour wants a path to U.S citizenship for folks who want no part of his former confederates.

The rest Pawlenty etc. instead of agreeing with the position that both Bushes, Jeb and W or McCain's old position they would cave in to the wingnut base to preserve their viability within the Tea baggie rump of the party.

Let me know when Romney boldly takes a side in the Arizona immigration law debate. Same goes for the other oft-mentioned candidates for the GOP 2012 nomination: Palin, Pawlenty, hell, throw Barbour & Daniels in there too. Any of 'em take a stand on the issue? I could see Palin taking the xenophobe side, but the rest don't strike me as being capable of making up their minds about which side would better boost their prospects, and thus, they will not.

Posted by: bsimon1

Posted by: MerrillFrank | April 29, 2010 11:12 AM | Report abuse

This is perfect for Democrats. Crist will pull enough of the moderate republicans to criple Rubio and hand us the election. I will continue to watch the rethugs self-implode in their race for conserative purity.

Posted by: insider9909 | April 29, 2010 11:12 AM | Report abuse

OBAMA'S COMMITMENT TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE IS TO BE BIPARTISAN FOR ALL FOUR YEARS OF HIS TERM.

It is that simple.

Obama PROMISED TO 'BRING PEOPLE TOGETHER'

Where is that in Obama's statments this week.

OBAMA IS A FRAUD - THE FALSE CHARACTERIZATION AND LIES THIS WEEK HAVE BEEN WAY OUT OF CONTROL.


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 11:10 AM | Report abuse

RE: 'There are few unaffiliated Florida voters, and they'll be reluctant to leave their party.'

Explanation: Florida is a closed-primary state. If you are registered NPA or "Independent" you would lose out on voting in your party's primary. I'm a registered FLA DEM but you can bet I will be voting for Charlie Crist in November. Here's why:

The DEM party establishment has given us a wholly unacceptable candidate in Kendrick Meek. Yet all of the Party Establishment (Electeds) support him. No one else does. He was elected in a part of Miami (like most parts of Miami) that elect only their ethnic compatriots. Mark Rubio is also from Miami, I might note.

I am a 'mainstream' voter. I will NOT even consider voting for Marco Bushio-Chenio.

In the Dem Primary, I will likely vote for Maurice Ferre, simply because I would not want to vote for Kendrick Meek, a politician who won his congressional seat merely because he succeeded his mother, Rep.Carrie Meek.

Charlie Crist, as our Governor, has shown himself to be independent, reasonable, competent, pragmatic. Something we Floridians want in our elected Senator.
+++++++++

Considering you are a Democrat, I'm not sure what your issues is with Meek are when you say he's totally unacceptable? He's served his constituency well, avoided trouble, and tows the party line.

As for Crist, I find the man totally opportunistic. He takes stands on an issue only to change them when it suits him. When you find yourself unable to figure out where a politician stands on the issues- that's a problem.

I'll probably vote for Rubio considering that we already have a Democratic Senator. That and the fact that (though I may differ on some views with the man) I know where Rubio stands(like Bill Nelson)- unlike Crist.

Posted by: moebius22 | April 29, 2010 11:09 AM | Report abuse

12BarBlues:

I would direct you to this link:

http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2008-10-27/my-brush-with-rush/

It's kind of amusing. Rush Limbaugh thinks of himself as Buckley's successor and in fact, put out feelers to see if Buckley's son would allow him to give the eulogy at Buckley's funeral.

Needless to say, the self-invitation was declined.

Posted by: Bondosan | April 29, 2010 11:07 AM | Report abuse

Is Crist abandoning the GOP, or did the GOP abandon Crist first? And did the GOP abandon C(h)rist long ago? :-)

Posted by: gce1356 | April 29, 2010 11:04 AM | Report abuse

I haven't listened to Limbaugh for a number of years. Back in the day when he had pretty much the monopoly on talk radio, he weepingly paid homage to Buckley. But now that there is this "anti-elitist" canard is a closely held to the breast principle for Tea drinkers, he probably stays mute. Unless he can come up with a slick way (and he is very slick) to frame it as: "Our elites are better than their elites."

Look. The truth is that since the 2008 election, Limbaugh--like so man others of his particular ilk--have become as unhinged as were their fringe left counterparts after the 2000 election. I must confess though that the fringe left had a far better case for being angry about Bush's appointment by the Supreme Court than Limbaugh and his bile soaked confederates have about Obama's legitimate and fair election.

An interesting aside about the 2000 election: On the day of the election, Limbaugh was urging his listeners to be on alert because he was convinced that the left was going to make a claim in court should Al Gore win the electoral vote but not a popular majority, the exact reverse of what actually happened. Thus, wiothout a blush or a hint of a whisper of embarrassment, Limbaugh jumped on the opposite side of the question when Al Gore won the popular vote but lost Florida to Anton Scalia.

Posted by: jaxas70 | April 29, 2010 11:03 AM | Report abuse

RE: 'There are few unaffiliated Florida voters, and they'll be reluctant to leave their party.'

Explanation: Florida is a closed-primary state. If you are registered NPA or "Independent" you would lose out on voting in your party's primary. I'm a registered FLA DEM but you can bet I will be voting for Charlie Crist in November. Here's why:

The DEM party establishment has given us a wholly unacceptable candidate in Kendrick Meek. Yet all of the Party Establishment (Electeds) support him. No one else does. He was elected in a part of Miami (like most parts of Miami) that elect only their ethnic compatriots. Mark Rubio is also from Miami, I might note.

I am a 'mainstream' voter. I will NOT even consider voting for Marco Bushio-Chenio.

In the Dem Primary, I will likely vote for Maurice Ferre, simply because I would not want to vote for Kendrick Meek, a politician who won his congressional seat merely because he succeeded his mother, Rep.Carrie Meek.

Charlie Crist, as our Governor, has shown himself to be independent, reasonable, competent, pragmatic. Something we Floridians want in our elected Senator.

Posted by: cherubino1 | April 29, 2010 10:58 AM | Report abuse

We can try to analyze 37th&O all we want, but he is simply a troll. He will do ANYTHING to draw attention to himself, to drag the conversation to what he wants to say (racism, inner cities, blacks, et al. We are all familiar with his favorite rants). He LOVES it that we are discussing him now. He's a self centered person who is on this blog all day long attempting to make it revolve around him.

Every person who responds to him or talks about him (including my post) is feeding his voracious appetite to be the center of attention.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 29, 2010 10:56 AM | Report abuse

"a startup"

bsimon, thanks, a hopeful message.
I have heard of this...has this company gone public? If so, do you know its ticker symbol?

Posted by: shrink2 | April 29, 2010 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Who would want to stay with the 'Republican Party of Freaks'?. Only a freak.

Posted by: jimsillan | April 29, 2010 10:56 AM | Report abuse

I remember during the Bush I/Clinton race how my peers laughed at me when I argued Bush I's embrace of the radical right would send the Independents to Clinton. My peers at Houston Communnity College were not laughing after the election. teaching at a community college is the best job I ever had.

Anyway, the Repubicans are about to hang themselves with teabags

Florida Governor Crist is about to turn the Republicans upside down. He is abandoning his run for the US Senate as a Republican. Moderate Republicans and Independents will vote for Crist - he may even get the votes of conservative Democrats. There is a real fear of the radical right. The Florida election could mean doom for the Republicans in Florida.

Arizona is facing the same problem with McCain. If the far right succeed at defeating McCain in the primaries, it could force Independents and moderate to liberal Republicans to vote Democrat

Posted by: bobbywc | April 29, 2010 10:54 AM | Report abuse

Charlie Crist, soon to be independent Senate candidate from Florida, tried to reach White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel through intermediates, but the Whie House refused to take the call, according to Marc Ambinder, who is also reporting the Democrats are planning a “big talent/money blitz for Kendrick Meek.”
++++++++++++++

A man with no principles finds himself with no friends to call on.

Posted by: moebius22 | April 29, 2010 10:53 AM | Report abuse

shrink2 writes
"Makes one wish bio-tech fuels were coming on line faster than they are"

MIT Technology Review has been covering a startup that has bio-engineered an organism that takes CO2 as input and excretes ethanol or biodiesel as output. They want to have an industrial scale plant up & running by 2012.

Posted by: bsimon1 | April 29, 2010 10:49 AM | Report abuse

Poor 37th and0street. He still believes in that old Goebbels inspired propaganda maxim that if you repeat a lie over and over, eventually people will come to believe it. OBAMA'S LIES MUST STOP! BLAH, BLAH AND BLAH.

Look. Consider 37th's monumental hypocrisy here. I would bet you my next campaign donation from Goldman Sachs that 37th would approve of the recent Supreme Court decision that essentially says money is a form of speech. Yet he piously attacks Hillary Clinton for taking money from Goldman Sachs while defending the Court decision that makes it legal and sanctifies it under the comic rubric of "free speech". That is hypocrisy on a galactic scale!

37TH believes free speech is a commodity like any other commodity like say, tea. The more money you have, the more tea. And the more "free" speech. Like all right wing definitions, they distort the meaning of simple word beyond any recognition. Fealty to their sick ideology and their bigotry trumps all common sense.

Posted by: jaxas70 | April 29, 2010 10:48 AM | Report abuse

I believe Frum and the more intellectual side of the movement are onto something. Unless they can bring this angry fringe back into the mainstream of conservatism, the movement is likely to fade and die on the vine. This is far bigger than just the next election. The very survival of conservatism as a viable political force in politics is at stake.

Posted by: jaxas70 | April 29, 2010 10:32 AM
-----------------------------------
It usually the case that when the Rush Limbaughs of the world preach to their listeners to scorn "liberal elite intellectuals", that their listeners boil it down to scorn "intellectuals". Isn't this similar to the situation in the 1950's when William F. Buckley waged a mighty war against the most extreme parts of the right wing? At that time, Buckley eventually prevailed.

I wonder how much respect a guy like Rush Limbaugh would give to someone like Buckley.

Posted by: 12BarBlues | April 29, 2010 10:46 AM | Report abuse

"Still, the media are generally reluctant to change their narrative accordingly. I have to wonder if many of them--including the writer of this column--are so devoted to this narrative that they have become invested in it."

Not only are they invested in it, they are clinging to it for dear life. No one was more surprised than the press the last two elections.

Like everone else here, I ask Chris -- could you stop 37 from spamming all day?

Posted by: drindl | April 29, 2010 10:41 AM | Report abuse

yay! we had 3+1/2 hours of Corner free comments!!! wooo hooo! it was bliss while it lasted, lots of great comments from both sides, and no insults really... see Corner,that's how adults discuss things that they disagree about, calmly, factually and with a certain modicum of respect for the process which doesnot include flooding and double spacing. try it sometime...

Posted by: katem1 | April 29, 2010 10:39 AM | Report abuse

Poor Charlie is just a tanned Arlen Specter.

Posted by: Lilycat1 | April 29, 2010 10:37 AM | Report abuse

The Fix writes
"Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney will endorse seven Republicans running for office in Illinois today..."

Let me know when Romney boldly takes a side in the Arizona immigration law debate. Same goes for the other oft-mentioned candidates for the GOP 2012 nomination: Palin, Pawlenty, hell, throw Barbour & Daniels in there too. Any of 'em take a stand on the issue? I could see Palin taking the xenophobe side, but the rest don't strike me as being capable of making up their minds about which side would better boost their prospects, and thus, they will not.

Posted by: bsimon1 | April 29, 2010 10:37 AM | Report abuse

I'm right behind you Bondosan, see y'all later.

Mark, even though 37th and zouk street thread jack all day every day, we probably shouldn't.

So I’ll post my view of the F&F narrative back where we were last night, in a bit.
Boils down to this, America has a very peculiar, unique really, blend of socialism and capitalism in its approach to getting as many people as possible into property ownership. It has worked better than anywhere else or any time in world history.

Now, did the wheels came off the car, or were they stolen? I think we can come to an agreement on whether F&F was central to the cause of the real estate crisis, or was a victim of it. Lets look at whether F&F was the reason the disaster, the recession did not turn into a depression and whether perhaps F&F is now the reason our recovery began as fast as it did.

The toxic assets sitting there were and still are pure poison. The market, the banks, the private sector in general is being protected by the much maligned, F&F.

But I’ll make the argument in more detail, work permitting. ;-}

Posted by: shrink2 | April 29, 2010 10:34 AM | Report abuse

Good News!!

Pursuing the right issues and voting for right bills is more important than be branded as Republican or Democrat. This move should free Christ from the age old way Washington has been working.

Posted by: swavde | April 29, 2010 10:33 AM | Report abuse

A word about conservatism. You are going to be reading about, hearing and seeing a great deal about a term called "Epistemic Closure". It is a term more properly familiar as close mindedness. It is presently being used by prominent conservative intellectuals in the context of what is happening to the conservative movement in this year, 2010.

What it is about is a fracture in the conservative movement between its more rational, intellectual side where principles and ideas are formulated and its more radical, extreme side where anger, emotion and a sort of pretend movement identifies itself as separate and apart from the classic traditional form of conservatism. As an example, David Frum represents the traditional conservative, Rush Limbaugh represents the more frothy, angry, emotional conservative who has no particular love for the intellectual side of the movement.

I believe Frum and the more intellectual side of the movement are onto something. Unless they can bring this angry fringe back into the mainstream of conservatism, the movement is likely to fade and die on the vine. This is far bigger than just the next election. The very survival of conservatism as a viable political force in politics is at stake.

Posted by: jaxas70 | April 29, 2010 10:32 AM | Report abuse

OH yea - Hillary didn't run 3 CAMPAIGNS IN 10 YEARS - ALL IN WHICH SHE WAS FUNDRAISING THROUGH WALL STREET ?

OBAMA'S LIES HAVE TO STOP


OBAMA'S LIES HAVE TO STOP


OBAMA'S LIES HAVE TO STOP


OBAMA'S LIES HAVE TO STOP

Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 10:20 AM | Report abuse

Oops...37 has woken up with his usual hangover and bad breath.

See y'all later.

Chris: Did you stop at Billy's? Can you do something about 37 before he posts 612 repetitive messages today?

Posted by: Bondosan | April 29, 2010 10:17 AM | Report abuse

CORRECTION NEEDED. As of this writing, the people who run the Washington Post home page have decided to give this posting a headline stating that Crist is "switching parties." (not here on the page, but back on the general Wapo homepage).

Of course that would mean he is switching from one party (GOP) to another (Dem), which he is not doing, unless there has been a REALLY surprising development. This kind of political illiteracy makes Chris look ill-informed and sloppy. Please fix for the Fix.

Posted by: fairfaxvoter | April 29, 2010 10:14 AM | Report abuse

I'm also quite curious about how Arizona's Senate race will play out.

John McCain will rescind his endorsement of Crist now that Crist is running as an independent. However, if McCain loses in the Republican primary, I wonder if he might consider his own independent run (like his BFF Smokin' Joe Lieberman).

Anyone on this board from Arizona? Is it even possible to mount an independent bid post-primary in Arizona like Lieberman did in Connecticut?

Posted by: Bondosan | April 29, 2010 10:13 AM | Report abuse

The Lies of the democrats just get thicker and thicker - as Obama still refuses to be bipartisan - and continues his RACIAL ATTACKS.


This week Obama has decided to portray the Republicans as supporting the big banks.

OH, no Bill Clinton didnt deregulate the derivatives market


- Bill Clinton didnt repeal Glass-Steagall


- Barney Frank never took any money from Wall Street


- Chris Dodd didn't take any money from Wall Street


- Obama was not the LEADING CASH LEADER of money from FANNIE MAE AND FREDDIE MAC

The LIES OF OBAMA JUST KEEP ON COMING - IT'S THE LIE PARADE HUH?


IT IS SICKENING AND VILE TO RUN THE COUNTRY THIS WAY.


Posted by: 37thand0street | April 29, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

I agree, Mr. Crist has done what he could for the benefit of Floridians rather than just the power-seekers of the GOP. He seems practical and is smart to leave the party of sewer rats that believe in devouring their own for exercising thier judgement. Rubio is part of the GOP party machine and will be beholden to the former Gov. of Mass, the Senator from Texas, the former Gov. of Alaska, the Republican obstructionists and the rest of out-of-staters before he acts on behalf of the people of Florida. It's all really quite simple and obvious.

Posted by: MikeA3 | April 29, 2010 10:02 AM | Report abuse

All rational Republicans (a small minority I'm afraid) are fleeing the foaming at the mouth, rabid right. Birthers? Teabaggers? Christian America??

Good for Crist.

Posted by: thebobbob | April 29, 2010 9:59 AM | Report abuse

Crist is representative of everything that went wrong with Republicans in the last few years. He is the typical cynical politicians that is only looking after himself. Republicans are well off getting rid of this type of "Republican".
America is in great danger at the moment and cynical politicians like Crist have no idea. All Republicans should become aware of what is this major danger that encapsulates all issues and the only source to put an explanation is in http://www.robbingamerica.com in a piece called, "The ‘New Proletariat’ And the ‘New Central Bureaucracy’ ".

Posted by: JohnGalt9 | April 29, 2010 9:54 AM | Report abuse

Admittedly a registered Democrat, who has very seldom voted for a Republican, but often find myself intrigued by those candidates with no party affiliation.

There isn't any party or any one person who has all the right answers. While I am generally comfortable with Obama's job as President (with the exception of strongly disagreeing with his education RttT plan), I would probably vote for Crist if a voter in Florida.

Time for real discussion's to take place, and not just posturing. Party loyalty has replaced rational decision making.

Posted by: ilcn | April 29, 2010 9:54 AM | Report abuse

I think that the media hyping the tea party protests and the polls has had a negative impact in that this daily down on democrats narrative has promoted a certain sense of inevitability that the GOP is going to win back both Houses of Congress.

Yet, the recent ABC News/Washington Post poll seems to indicate a fledgling turnaround in this narrative. This poll shows that the generic ballot has improved for the democrats over the previous polls which had showed a steady gain for republicans.

Still, the media are generally reluctant to change their narrative accordingly. I have to wonder if many of them--including the writer of this column--are so devoted to this narrative that they have become invested in it. But, what if this narrative was never all that rational in the first place. Historically, the party in power loses in the midterms. But, the polling on this midterm began so early that one has to wonder if they media simply went too far overboard and may find themselves embarrassed once again if the traditional "coming home" phenomenon occurs as we get closer to election day.

Posted by: jaxas70 | April 29, 2010 9:50 AM | Report abuse

I have never believed in the "working backwards from election day" philosophy of spending your campaign cash. It rarely ever works. Specter has been on the air early and often and I think it's too late for Sestak.

It's really a shame, because I suspect this will be Specter's last term (assuming he wins). If Sestak had simply built up more of a record in the House over the next few years, he could have been the natural successor to Specter's seat. Oh, well. Impatience and ambition got the better of him. It's happened to many others.

I find Florida's race fascinating. I really think Meek has a real shot at winning this thing. The fact that he was a captain with the Florida Highway Patrol will make for some very nice commercials (hopefully featuring some of his former law-enforcement buddies).

We shall see....

Posted by: Bondosan | April 29, 2010 9:49 AM | Report abuse

I certainly believe that it's time this country had a viable 3rd party.

It seems to me that too many nominations are decided by political litmus tests dictated by the FAR LEFT and FAR RIGHT as opposed to precisely what the candidate is bringing to the table in terms of experience and temperament.

Posted by: Jay20 | April 29, 2010 9:42 AM | Report abuse

I certainly believe that it's time this country had a viable 3rd party.

It seems to me that too many nominations are decided by political litmus tests as opposed to precisely what the candidate is bringing to the table in terms of experience and temperament.

Posted by: Jay20 | April 29, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

Crist will most likely win. As a campaign gets under way and the bulk of Florida voters realize their choice is Crist, a Democrat, or the nut case tea bagger he choice will be Crist or Democrat. Only the looniest of loonies wants a John Birch tea bagger nut case actually in government.

Posted by: John1263 | April 29, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

First, as a Florida resident and registered NPA, I won't vote for Crist because he is a liar...he promised to lower insurance, fight the insurance companies and lower our taxes. He ended up raising our vehicle tag tax, buckled to the insurance companies, backed out of legislation to require the insurance companies to provide coverage for home if they provided/sold any kind of property type insurance in Florida and then the nail in his coffin for me was the suggestion of introducing a state income tax. Overall our insurance went up, our taxes went up and the old man thought he should dip deeper in our pockets. SORRY CHARLIE! I don't want you to represent me anymore.

Posted by: Missy8 | April 29, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

As a liberal registered Republican in Florida (how's that for a trifecta!), I'm pleased to have Rubio run in a head-to-head general election with the Crist. Meek wouldn't have gotten my vote, anyway. Crist (or Jebby for that matter) seem to be less doctrinaire than a Rubio type--and we need more in Washington who are interested in the merits of an issue than the party affiliation of the person who raises the issue.

Posted by: InRealAmerica | April 29, 2010 9:34 AM
___________________________________________
Would that more Republicans, and Democrats for that matter, think like this.

Posted by: Lefty_ | April 29, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

one time threadjack for shrink:

The wiki article called 'Fannie Mae' is a ccomplete enough reference for my abbreviated defense of "stepchildren".
FNMA was a governmental entity until 1968, when it was privatized. But government backing of its securities remained implicit. Here was a private organization run for the benefit of shareholders selling a product perceived to be backed by the full faith and credit of the USA. My appellation is "stepchild". In the deregulation frenzy, that safest of all investments, a FNMA mortgage backed security, facing increased competition from the speculators like G-S, began packaging loans without real substance into their MBSs. Now these services are in receivership. Taxpayers are backing the implicit guarantee. When the receivership ends, and how, is up for grabs. To avoid the repeat performance, underwriting rules must be tighter on the mortgage end. However, that is not enough. If we are to have taxpayers servicing loans than taxpayers should be profiting. We either go back to pre-`1968, or cast the entities loose from implicit government support.

Why is this a big problem now? Because FanFred is by definition "too big to fail". Thus I favor pre-1968 government ownership and conservative lending and fundraising policies as an end result. A mortgage buyer of last resort is just going to be too darned big.
If we can get by without a mortgage buyer of last resort, so that privatized, FanFred will shrink in size to manageable levels that can allow them to fail without crippling the economy, I would like to see that proposal.

From your view as a psychiatrist you may have a better shorthand than "stepchild", and if you post it I will feel free to adopt it with attribution, of course.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | April 29, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

Charlie Crist governed Florida despite a horrible Republican Legislature..

Just for his ballsy retreat from a draconian party.

Plus he has integrity, which is non existent in the GOP, I would vote for him in Florida.

ISA

Posted by: Issa1 | April 29, 2010 9:35 AM | Report abuse

As a liberal registered Republican in Florida (how's that for a trifecta!), I'm pleased to have Rubio run in a head-to-head general election with the Crist. Meek wouldn't have gotten my vote, anyway. Crist (or Jebby for that matter) seem to be less doctrinaire than a Rubio type--and we need more in Washington who are interested in the merits of an issue than the party affiliation of the person who raises the issue.

Posted by: InRealAmerica | April 29, 2010 9:34 AM | Report abuse

Meek. No s.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | April 29, 2010 9:31 AM | Report abuse

Has anyone North of Miami ever heard of Kendrick Meek? Even hard core political people still spell his name wrong.

If Crist can present himself as the only moderate (read, safe) choice, he can win and going away.

Posted by: shrink2 | April 29, 2010 9:26 AM | Report abuse

The Republicans continue the purge of moderates from their ranks and persist in marching down the road to irrelevance. Now they've probibly lost a sure Senate seat and seriously pssed off the guy who is most likely going to win. They continue to follow the Reich wing and the Tea-baggers to ruin. Way to go Pubes!

Posted by: Lefty_ | April 29, 2010 9:24 AM | Report abuse

AndyR3, that is an intersting voting bloc you are proposing.

I don't think Crist can win, but I'm hoping he can keep Rubio from winning!

Posted by: margaretmeyers | April 29, 2010 9:19 AM | Report abuse

Crist has got no chance. In 2006, he was elected governor with 52% of the vote. Rubio is going to take most of that 52%; he polls far better than Crist among Republicans and conservatives.

So to win, Crist needs to win over that 48% of voters who voted against him in 2006. He has to win Democratic and Independent voters without the money, organization, and endorsements of a major party. All Meeks has to do is hold on to most of the Democratic voters and he wins.

I'd say that Meeks is most likely to win, then Rubio, then Crist. Crist may have made the right decision for his own career, but he'll still be out of a job in November.

Posted by: Blarg | April 29, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

I wonder what Rubio's position is on offshore drilling these days?

Posted by: steve1231 | April 29, 2010 9:15 AM | Report abuse

Gallenod,
Some Dems who could jump ship to a third party. Nelson, Heath Shuler, Evan Bayh, Jim Webb, and Harold Ford. Throw into that mix Castle from DE, and Specter too. It also would give Snowe and Collins a way out of the GOP too.

Posted by: AndyR3 | April 29, 2010 9:12 AM | Report abuse

THE current
Right Wing REPUBLICAN Party
is the
RINO

ISA

Posted by: Issa1 | April 29, 2010 9:05 AM | Report abuse

WHY WHITE HOUSE / PENTAGON PRESS CORPS IS A.W.O.L. ON THE HOMELAND CELLULAR "TORTURE TOWERS" DOMESTIC WEAPON SYSTEM

The White House press corps has neutered itself -- or should I say, the news organizations who assign reporters to that post have neutered themselves -- by assigning malleable, establishmentarian subjects to that steno pool, drones who stick to the "story of the day" meme and rarely stray from the script.

Case in point: The U.S. government has installed in every neighborhood in America a microwave/laser/radio frequency "directed energy" weapon system, camouflaged in cell towers, that is being used 24/7 by operatives under the command and control of the Homeland-run multi-agency "fusion center" network to silently precision-target and attack "targeted individuals" with harmful, painful, debilitating and behavior-altering electromagnetic frequencies.

This veteran mainstream journalist broke this story last December. I have published the patent number that describes this powerful, scalar wave electromagnetic technology, a little-known science that produces vast amounts of energy from a vacuum state (U.S. Patent No. 7629918).

Not a single mainstream journalist has bothered to ask the White House, or the Pentagon, whether such a system has been deployed domestically, or about credible reports from victims all across America -- perhaps even some political leaders -- who are being targeted for microwave and other radio frequency irradiation.

Instead, it appears, they have bought into a campaign of Soviet gulag-style character assassination directed at journalists who report about the use of radio frequencies to harm and subjugate those deemed by security bureaucrats to be "dissidents" or undesirables -- and that could be anybody.

So here's a test: Surely some members of the White House or Pentagon press corps are reading this. Please read my lead article on the subject, and the linked Raytheon patent, and craft a question about the subject that requires officials to address the deployment of this weapon system, and not the character or mental health of those who dare to write about it. The links:

http://nowpublic.com/world/u-s-silently-tortures-americans-cell-tower-microwaves
http://nowpublic.com/world/gestapo-usa-govt-funded-vigilante-network-terrorizes-america
OR NowPublic.com/scrivener RE: "Obama: Take Down Fusion Center Gestapo, Fire Secret Service Boss"

Posted by: scrivener50 | April 29, 2010 9:04 AM | Report abuse

Funny, maybe Crist should join the Democratic party, since that seems to be where most of his supporters are.

Posted by: Benson | April 29, 2010 8:59 AM | Report abuse

I hope Piyush Jindal has heretofore unseen leadership qualities because Louisiana is going to need all it can get.

"One fire-fighting expert told the BBC the disaster might become the "biggest oil spill in the world".

Rear Admiral Mary Landry and BP's Doug Suttles gave an update on the crisis

"Probably the only thing comparable to this is the Kuwait fires [following the Gulf War in 1991]," Mike Miller, head of Canadian oil well fire-fighting company Safety Boss, told BBC World Service.

"The Exxon Valdez [tanker disaster off Alaska in 1989] is going to pale [into insignificance] in comparison to this as it goes on."

Posted by: shrink2 | April 29, 2010 8:56 AM | Report abuse

Republicans need to take back their party and Christ could be the one to do it.

While we wait, this oil rig disaster sure is going to cause trouble for the Drill baby drill! crowd. This was supposed to be impossible. We were assured these rigs had fail safe mechanisms...

And then one has to wonder about the hype around the new super safe nuclear facilities.

Makes one wish bio-tech fuels were coming on line faster than they are

Posted by: shrink2 | April 29, 2010 8:48 AM | Report abuse

I'm disappointed that Sestak has left it this late. Nice rebuttal, though.

Andy, I'm with you on that Florida analysis, though starting a third party would require at least a few more Dems to join dissident Republican moderates. The catalyst might be if both parties veer farther towards the edges but there are enough centrists in both parties in the Senate who join (like the informal "Gang of 14" a few years ago) into a "middle" party. Crist proving that you can win by running down the middle as an independent(somewhat like Leiberman) would be a step towards that.

Who might be the next Indy candidate? Ben Nelson? Lindsey Graham?

John McCain?

Posted by: Gallenod | April 29, 2010 8:47 AM | Report abuse

I know it is WAY to far in advance to do this, but anyone want to make a prediction on what the percentages in FL will be on election day? My prediction,
Crist: 40%
Meeks: 32%
Rubio: 28%

Headline: Independence Day!

Posted by: AndyR3 | April 29, 2010 8:38 AM | Report abuse

This political "3-Card Monte" that's about to take place in Florida is going to be more fun than watching a good old W. C. Fields movie. Strap in your seats hard and fast because what's about to happen between Rubio, Meeks, and Crist is going to give the country more ups and downs than any ride in Disneyworld.

Crist will win.

Posted by: jms3rd | April 29, 2010 8:28 AM | Report abuse

It also looks like Blanche Lincoln is taking a page out of Specter's play book and going on the offensive early. I still think both of them win their primaries and I think it may end up helping them in the end. Once the Senate passes the Financial reform bill Lincoln will be able to claim a huge vicotry for her part in regulating the derivatives market.

Posted by: AndyR3 | April 29, 2010 8:12 AM | Report abuse

The Florida race will definitly be a barn burner in the amount of money and ink that is spent on polling and analysis. My initial prediction is that this race just became a two horse race between Crist and Meeks. I think Rubio has peaked and with 6 months to go more and more will come out about how he is a fire breathing conservative with some ethical issues. Most republicans would have voted for the Rubio if he had won the nomination, but now that they have a real second option they will start to reasses Crist. This will be especially true if Meeks makes a move up in the polls. Meeks strategy should be to convince Democrats that he can win and that they should stay with him. Crist should try to scare Democrats into thinking that Meeks can't win and that he is the better option than Rubio. On this side an endorsement by Joe Liebermann would help a lot. I also think Crist should try and get Bloomberg, Schwarzenegger, and Lincoln Chafee to endorse him as well.

My prediction is that if Crist wins, Chafee, Lieberman and Crist may push to start a new party. My vote for the name is the Commonwealth Party. Then they could tell people that they will causus with the leader/party that they think will support bipartisanship.

Posted by: AndyR3 | April 29, 2010 8:04 AM | Report abuse

The Governor of Florida has a right as an American to make his decision about staying with the Republican party or running as an independent. It's obvious that Rubio enjoys support from the extreme conservative wing of the Republican party which fails to allow for the views of a moderate governor and his likely supporters. This situation is quite analogous to what Joe Lieberman faced in Connecticut.

Endorsements of Rubio by former Vice President Cheney and previous candidates like Mike Huckabee (paroler of convicted felons) and Mitt Romney (author of the Massachusetts health reform plan) and former do nothing governor Jeb Bush mean very little to most Florida voters.

Governor Crist in making his decision should take into account those Republican and independent moderate voters who will not have an alternative when casting a ballot in the upcoming primary election unless he runs as an independent. If I were facing Crist's dilemma I would make my decision based on what's best for Florida voters, all of them, not based on a party endorsement that has been dictated by others.

Frankly, it will be both courageous and patriotic on Governor Crist's part to stand up to these fair weather friends and provide a choice for moderate Florida voters. He is a strong leader and that will power will now be observed by everyone.

I wish him well if he decides to stand up for all Florida voters. He has my full support! He is a true public servant in contrast to the crass politicians of today. He will win this senate seat and be one of the great legislators of American history.

Dr. Alan Phillips
Bloomington, IL

Posted by: ctw46 | April 29, 2010 7:53 AM | Report abuse

Rubio should be scared out of his GOP credit card-paid suit. Crist can very well beat him in a general with his moderate appeal and broad coalition. The Tea Party cannot win this election for Rubio on their own, unless they do it with brute strength and fraud...

http://www.political-buzz.com/

Posted by: parkerfl1 | April 29, 2010 7:51 AM | Report abuse

On eve of Independent Run, Ram Emanuel to Charlie Crist: Drop Dead!

http://bit.ly/deqq9D

Posted by: saintpetersblog | April 29, 2010 7:50 AM | Report abuse

Rubio should be scared out of his GOP credit card-paid suit. Crist can very well beat him in a general with his moderate appeal and broad coalition. The Tea Party cannot win this election for Rubio on their own, unless they do it with brute strength and fraud...

http://www.political-buzz.com/

Posted by: parkerfl1 | April 29, 2010 7:49 AM | Report abuse

allenridge: SecDef Gates? Is that your idea, or one that has been floated elsewhere? If so, please link.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | April 29, 2010 7:42 AM | Report abuse

#3 - Specter had to be called down for his attack on Sestak's naval career. However, the defense would have sounded better coming from retired naval flag officers. At least one of his former superiors, the one who best knew him, has come forward to explain exactly what happened and how Sestak was in no way less than completely honorable.

That should have been canned into a sixty second spot with a younger Navy vet concluding that it is politicians like Specter who are no friends of the men and women who serve.

The objective is to say what Sestak said - but to have it come from the mouths of others.

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Posted by: ouliqing | April 29, 2010 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Can't wait to vote for Mitt Romney.

Here's a real leader with proven experience and results.

Not to mention pragmatic and CLEAN......

Romney / Gates 2012

Posted by: allenridge | April 29, 2010 7:28 AM | Report abuse

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate_election_in_Florida,_2010#Rubio_.28R.29_v._Meek_.28D.29_v._Crist_.28I.29

Basically the polling that's been done on three way races. I wonder how accurate a three way poll is when there is no official third party candidate. Rubio is leading, but just by a slim margin. (with one poll a few weeks ago showing Crist winning) I can imagine him losing quite a bit of support going into the fall. Meek and Crist will undoubtedly train most of their fire on the top dog and a lot of those attacks will land as Rubio does have some very serious ethical concerns. We'll see if votes can be moved away from Rubio. There is a chance he's scraping the bottom of the barrel and his support won't leave with Crist and Meek in a two way race to get the votes among the rest of the 65% to top Rubio's 35%. I do think he will lose support as his ethical concerns come to light. On top of this, Meek probably has a higher ceiling than the mid 20s he's been polling at simply because he's relatively unknown and out of mind with the high profile Republican primary.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 29, 2010 7:24 AM | Report abuse

The curse of American politics. Lobbyist,political donations, buying power in a "for sale democracy." What happened to "for the people , by the people"? And we try to force American democracy on foreign countries, we see corruption in them, as with our own system. Politicians,sound bites, and money determine outcomes. Charlie Crists listening to the people of Florida bucks the republican agenda. I will vote for Charlie however he runs. The Bush boys and cronies were deprived of profits from there text book companies and educational software companies, by trying to short money to the Florida educatonal system. The buck stopped with Charlie Crist vetoe, thankyou Charlie

Posted by: roosboys | April 29, 2010 6:48 AM | Report abuse

Christy in NJ ran on pretty much the same magical promise as Rubio -- a balanced budget with only some critical thinking involved. Now Christy has presented his budget and the electorate is up in arms. They can't believe what he has proposed doing to NJ. What did they think was going to happen? The man is a Republican: his single idea of critical thinking is going to be smaller government.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | April 29, 2010 6:46 AM | Report abuse

Scott Howell is a pupil of Karl Rove. The people interviewed about Crist work for his company. The Republicans have different puppets repeating the same message. Adolph Hitler said that if you tell a lie long enough and loud enough, people will believe it. The Republicans have been using every propaganda technique available since the beginning of Rubio's campaign.

Posted by: roosboys | April 29, 2010 6:43 AM | Report abuse

NOW that the GOP looks set to loose the next elections in a re-run of the 2008 elections, it is not surprising that Crist wants to jump ship he won't be the only one either.

The Tea bag ladies have made the GOP unelectable.

And does any one else agree that the GOPs continued commie protection of the Welfare Queens of Wall Street is the last nail in the coffin?

The GOP is DEAD!

Some one bury the Republican parties rotting corpse it is starting to stink up the place.

Posted by: walker1 | April 29, 2010 6:42 AM | Report abuse

ggwalt and sutter- SMILE! I want a picture of the comments... so this is what it looks like without the Corner flooding, and spacing like he's claustrophobic.

Posted by: katem1 | April 29, 2010 6:37 AM | Report abuse

Rubio will keep on saying he'll deliver lower taxes, and smaller government, AND a smaller deficit, but will NOT tell voters ANY sacrifices they will have to make in order to accomplish this, because this will lose votes. And there just may be enough voters who believe it (most people have no good idea of how much various programs cost) that he could win.

Posted by: Sutter | April 29, 2010 6:31 AM | Report abuse

Crist seems far too reasonable for the GOP. Only extremist fringe wackadoodles need apply. It's frightening to think that people in this country actually continue to vote for Republicans, considering their horrible track record on any given issue, and inability to ever get anything done. Not only do they never get things done, they totally screw things up. They are indeed the Party of No Ideas, The Party of Know Nothing, The Party of Reactionary Extremists, The Party of Hypocrites. Need I go on?

Posted by: ggwalt | April 29, 2010 6:25 AM | Report abuse

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