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Morning Fix: Crist and the Club for Growth

1. The new ad being run in Florida by the Club for Growth should send shivers down Gov. Charlie Crist's (R) spine. The commercial features Crist saying "we know that it's important that we pass a stimulus package" and embracing President Obama at a rally earlier this year. (Highlighting "The Hug" seems to be an attempt by the Club to parallel the infamous George W. Bush-Joe Lieberman kiss from the Connecticut senator's 2006 primary campaign.) The Club has openly flirted with the prospect of endorsing former stater House speaker Marco Rubio (R) in the Senate race, a move that would significantly complicate Crist's path to the nomination given that the Club raised better than $400,000 for Conservative Party nominee Doug Hoffman's candidacy in the special election in the 23rd district of New York. Crist's awkward attempt to walk back his support for the stimulus bill over the last 24 hours has done little to satisfy angry fiscal conservatives and may have actually increased the likelihood that the Club gets involved.

2. Speaking of the Club, not only did they help Hoffman raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for his candidacy, they also spent another $550,000 on television ads and other communication with voters in the district, according to reports filed with the Federal Election Commission and Fix reporting. That spending was dwarfed by the two party committees, however, with the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee dumping $1.1 million into the race and the National Republican Congressional Committee spending $879,000. The DCCC got their man in Rep.-elect Bill Owens, however, while the NRCC saw their candidate -- state Assemblywoman Dede Scozzafava -- drop from the race in the last minutes and endorse Owens. Was that sound of a flushing toilet?

3. Ramesh Ponnuru has a thoughtful piece on what the election results from Tuesday mean for the Republican Party in the latest issue of Time. Ponnuru dismisses the chatter of a lasting divide between the ideological right and middle -- rightly noting that Scozzafava was not a moderate Republican but a liberal Republican -- and instead writes that the biggest problem facing the GOP has been that "voters have not thought Republicans of any stripe had answers to their most pressing concerns" and adding that "addressing those concerns, rather than repositioning itself along the ideological spectrum, is the party's main challenge." Ponnuru highlights the successes of Bob McDonnell (Va.) and Chris Christie (N.J.) as evidence that the charge that the GOP lacks empathy or answers is fading and cites the workmanlike, pragmatic approach taken by former governor Mitt Romney (Mass.) since his defeat in 2008 as a sign that the party will continue to move in the right -- as opposed to the Right -- direction. Time will tell whether Ponnuru's thesis is right as ideologically-focused primaries in places like Florida, Kentucky and Illinois have the potential to rip the scab off of the moderate vs. conservative fight. But his argument is well worth reading.

4. New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo (D) will be feted at a fundraiser in Washington later this month, an event sure to stoke speculation about whether he plans to run for governor of the Empire State in 2010. The Nov. 16 event will be co-hosted by lobbyists Tony Podesta, the brother of Obama transition director John Podesta, and Bill Titelman, a major Philadelphia-based donor and fundraiser for, among others, the Clintons. Other heavy hitters included on the invitation, a copy of which was obtained by the Fix, include Recording Industry Association of America head honcho Mitch Bainwol and Motion Picture Association of American Chairman Dan Glickman. Polling suggests that Cuomo, who ran and lost a Democratic primary for governor in 2002, would crush Gov. David Paterson in a 2010 primary and would cruise in a general election when matched against either former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani or former representative Rick Lazio. Cuomo, perhaps wary of appearing to push Paterson out, has stayed silent on the potential race and has ordered those in his political orbit to do the same. The White House has been more vocal with political director Patrick Gaspard meeting with Paterson earlier this fall to urge him to reconsider a bid for a full term.

5. Paterson, seemingly unbowed by the criticism, is launching his first two ads of the 2010 campaign today. The commercials, which were produced by Steve Murphy and Mark Putnam, each acknowledge the problems Paterson has run into since taking over for disgraced Gov. Elliot Spitzer (D). In one, Paterson, speaking to the camera, says: "Some say I shouldn't be running for governor" before framing that sentiment against other challenges he has conquered -- fighting unions, closing the budget deficit etc. The second ad, a biography spot, notes that as governor Paterson has learned, he "made mistakes." The overarching theme of both ads is that Paterson has made decision with the people of the state in mind, not his own political calculus. The ads are rightly understood as an attempt by Paterson to punch up his numbers and, in the process, convince the White House, Cuomo and other New York Democrats that he can win and should be allowed to run.

6. California Rep.-elect John Garamendi's (D) victory on Tuesday in the state's 10th district means that his former post -- lieutenant governor -- is now vacant. The leading contender for the appointment by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) is moderate state Sen. Abel Maldonado, who drew widespread attention -- positive and negative -- for his decision to back the governor's budget package earlier this year. The pick must be confirmed by the large Democratic majorities in the state Assembly and state Senate and the thinking is that Maldonado would be one of the few Republicans who could win enough support in both chambers -- assuming he pledges not to seek the full term next November. There is also the possibility that Schwarzenegger leaves the job, which is held in very low regard among political operatives in the state, vacant until it is filled in the 2010 election.

7. Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak filed for governor Thursday, giving Democrats their strongest candidate to date in the 2010 Minnesota governor's race. In an e-mail to supporters about his decision, Rybak said his travels across the state convinced him that Minnesotans were "looking for leadership focused on more jobs, better schools and affordable health care." Rybak joins a very crowded Democratic field that includes seven other candidates seeking to replace Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R). Seven Republicans are running for the Republican nod with an eighth -- former senator Norm Coleman -- considering the contest but not likely to decide until next year. The Minnesota governorship is seen as a ripe pickup opportunity for Democrats given the state's progressive leanings.

8. David Plouffe, the man who managed President Obama's presidential bid in 2008, chatted live with Post readers on Thursday to promote "The Audacity to Win" -- his book recounting the race. Interesting tidbits: Plouffe was "never off the clock" only from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. . . . his advice to those who are trying to analyze what's to come off of the results off the 2009 elections is to "stop gasbagging and predicting and see where things stand in about ten months." Plouffe twice referred to the "Palin/Beck/Limbaugh wing" of the GOP. He also said he didn't take a job in the White House because "I needed to take a couple years to re-balance and spend time with my family, knowing that perhaps in the future my life will need to get unbalanced again" . . . let the speculation about what job Plouffe will have in the White House begin!

9. Speaking of live chats, the Fix is doing one at 10 a.m. today. Our "Live Fix"
online chat
gets started an hour early -- 10 a.m. -- so make sure to set your clocks! You can submit your best questions in advance or just follow along with our stream-of-consciousness riffs in real time.

10. Tweeting the Fort Hood shootings.

By Chris Cillizza  |  November 6, 2009; 5:28 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: And the winner is....
Next: Live Fix roundup

Comments

What is it with the conservatrolls and proper nouns? Is there some connection between political conservatism and missing a lot of grade school or something? Is it home-schooling?

Hint, "Bubbette," you don't get to capitalize words on the basis of your esteem alone. They have to either be proper nouns or at the beginnings of sentences.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 7, 2009 11:09 PM | Report abuse

Crist is toast and Rubio will win in the primary. The day of reckoning is coming for these Spendocrats particular anyone that signs on to health care. 2010 will see many of them leaving DC. The only question is if our Country can survive this idiocy until we can drain the swamp of these liberal wing-nuts.

Posted by: Bubbette1 | November 7, 2009 1:12 PM | Report abuse

I've pretty must stopped reading this blog too. It's too predictable.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 2:58 PM | Report abuse

can even you be so uncognizant of your own idiocy?

Of course it is predictable for you. You post most of the volume here and it is your own little facebook page. I would like to request some movie reviews and some recipes for next week if possible. And I really need to know about your travels and hobbies. Just can't get enough cynical, msdnc speak with a quiff spin.

Posted by: snowbama | November 7, 2009 11:25 AM | Report abuse

There seem to be very few intelligent posters left cc. Congrats to drivl and nambla. You have dragged the blog down into the sewer with you. Perseverence pays.

I noticed President Bush visited fort hood and quietly met with soldiers as before.

Present ident obambi is still trying to arrange for teleprompters and cameras so instead taped a speech.

Posted by: snowbama | November 7, 2009 11:18 AM | Report abuse

Ahhh, who's gonna miss a coupla quarts a day ...

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 11:48 PM | Report abuse

"Trickle-down only applies to urine"

Might want to see a urologist about that.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 4:44 PM | Report abuse


i'm lovin it...

The Urban Dictionary has added "Scozzafavaed" to its pages.

Scozzafavaed (Pronounced: /skoʊzəfavəd/) -verb
1. Purged of moderation, e.g., within in a Congressional district
2. Inadvertently revealed internal chaos, e.g., within in (sic) a political party
3. Adj., Doomed due to popular support of the GOP electorate
"Dude, you see Glenn Beck talking about how our congressman supports indoctrinating us in the ways of socialism through paper money last night?

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 4:28 PM | Report abuse

Read Krauthammer today? He takes the "repudiation of Obama" line.

==

My broken Geveve tells the correct time more often than Krauthammer gets anything right.

I remember when he used to write for TNR, he was farther right than most of the rest of their writers (this was before Fred Barnes took over and trashed the magazine completely), but he was sane. Now he's a nutbar and while he has done some exceptionally good columns now and again, it's not worth reading all the swill he usually writes in hope of the one.

I've pretty must stopped reading this blog too. It's too predictable.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 2:58 PM | Report abuse

"That's certainly true enough, bsimon. But I can't read him anyway."

There have been times I've agreed with him, but have lost my ability to tolerate his writing over the last couple years.

Posted by: bsimon1 | November 6, 2009 2:55 PM | Report abuse

Ramesh Ponnuru has a thoughtful piece on what the election results from Tuesday mean for the Republican Party in the latest issue of Time. Ponnuru dismisses the chatter of a lasting divide between the ideological right and middle -- rightly noting that Scozzafava was not a moderate Republican but a liberal Republican -- and instead writes that the biggest problem facing the GOP has been that "voters have not thought Republicans of any stripe had answers to their most pressing concerns" and adding that "addressing those concerns, rather than repositioning itself along the ideological spectrum, is the party's main challenge."

==

Elective self-delusion. As though the GOP's ideological extremity and its inability to come up with credible or useful policy ideas can be teased apart.

Newsflash, Ramesh and Chris: Republican ideas don't work. Trickle-down only applies to urine, nobody loves an invader, cutting taxes doesn't make up lost revenue in economic growth.

And bigotry is not coming back into fashion.

Sorry.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 2:54 PM | Report abuse

This is interesting...

"(CNN) - Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin is set to deliver remarks at a Wisconsin Right to Life event Friday evening, one of the few speeches the former Republican presidential nominee will have given since she resigned the governorship last summer.

But Palin appears to be doing her best to keep a low profile on this trip: no press will be allowed into the Milwaukee auditorium where she will speak and those who have paid the $30 admittance fee are unable to carry in cell phones, cameras, laptops, or recording devices of any kind."

Is she now so afraid of exposing her foot-in-mouth disease that even her faithful can't record her? Wonder if they will have full body searches? cellphones are pretty small.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 2:46 PM | Report abuse

I used to like him. Someone I disagreed with, but could still get something from. But over the last few years, he's become so militant in his defense of all things Cheney that it's just ridiculous.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 2:44 PM | Report abuse

That's certainly true enough, bsimon. But I can't read him anyway. Just looking at his smug, arrogant and sneering puss is too much.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 2:39 PM | Report abuse

"Read Krauthammer today? He takes the "repudiation of Obama" line."


Of course he does. Neither logic nor facts are regularly in evidence in Kraut's pieces.


.

Posted by: bsimon1 | November 6, 2009 2:27 PM | Report abuse

"Read Krauthammer today? He takes the "repudiation of Obama" line."

Because he is a joke who has been wrong about everything.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 2:15 PM | Report abuse

I live in MN and like Mayor Rybak a lot but it certainly isn't clear he is the strongest candidate, either in the caucus/primary process or the general. It will take a while for the race to shake out.

For one thing, most candidates will promise to abide by the party caucus early in 2010. I assume Rybak will do so. That quirky process is different from any primary, and perceptions of strength in November are only one part of it. Then, even if he gets the caucus endorsement, he still has to fight past some other self-funded Democrats (Mark Dayton, Matt Entenza) who would run against him in the primary. And *then* he has to win a general election where he will be viewed with suspicion by voters outside the Twin Cities.

Posted by: billmcg1 | November 6, 2009 2:13 PM | Report abuse

"How gratifying to see that the GOP is taking away exactly the wrong lesson. Yesssss, Club-for-Growth financing of social conservatives and free-market zombies sure is working out well, so by all means keep it up.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite"

Read Krauthammer today? He takes the "repudiation of Obama" line.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 2:08 PM | Report abuse

How gratifying to see that the GOP is taking away exactly the wrong lesson. Yesssss, Club-for-Growth financing of social conservatives and free-market zombies sure is working out well, so by all means keep it up.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 2:03 PM | Report abuse

ddawd writes
"Unemployment at 10.3% Not good news for the party in power."


Worked for Reagan.

Its all in the marketing, which the Dems are not currently doing well, at all.

Posted by: bsimon1 | November 6, 2009 1:13 PM | Report abuse

"I voted for Perot. Probably bsimon did, too."

Guilty. Twice. Given it was Bush-Clinton then Clinton-Dole I don't feel too bad.

.

Posted by: bsimon1 | November 6, 2009 12:20 PM | Report abuse

FORT HOOD MASSACRE: ECHOES OF 9-11? GULF OF TONKIN?

http://nowpublic.com/world/ft-hood-massacre-echoes-9-11-gulf-tonkin

Posted by: scrivener50 | November 6, 2009 12:17 PM | Report abuse

Unemployment at 10.3% Not good news for the party in power.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 12:15 PM | Report abuse

"I could not imagine voting for Corzine had I lived there, but I probably would have voted for Daggett.
But what do I know?
As many of you know, I voted for Perot. Probably bsimon did, too. ;-)

Posted by: mark_in_austin"

Too young to vote for Perot, but I did go for Nader. But in the the LA-2 election last year, I ended up voting for the Green Party guy since I couldn't vote Jefferson and I couldn't vote Republican. Needless to say, Rahim got crushed, but Jefferson lost and Cao has been a very pleasant surprise.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 12:14 PM | Report abuse

" The Rs are marginally less corrupt than the Ds in NJ according to folk wisdom."

Not so. In NJ, everyone is corrupt, even the priests and rabbis.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 12:02 PM | Report abuse

"let the speculation about what job Plouffe will have in the White House begin!"

From his interview on The Daily Show, I got the impression he's saying that he'll be back in for the 2012 campaign.

Posted by: nodebris | November 6, 2009 12:01 PM | Report abuse

"rightly noting that Scozzafava was not a moderate Republican but a liberal Republican"

Rightly? In a sense, I guess. A moderate American in the Republican party is a "liberal Republican" in the same what that charcoal is a "whitish black."

Posted by: nodebris | November 6, 2009 11:59 AM | Report abuse

It won't even be a contest if Cuomo gets into it, blade. trust me on this one. paterson has no costituency.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 11:58 AM | Report abuse

"voters have not thought Republicans of any stripe had answers to their most pressing concerns"
-----------------
The Republicans- Working to destroy the Lincoln legacy since 1865.
or
Working to preserve a rich white oligarchy since it worked so well with Bush.
or
Working on behalf of Medicare recipients for almost a week now.
or
Fiscally conservative since January 20, 2009.

"Jump in here anytime Lou. These are good topics." -Chief Wiggum

Posted by: DAMNEDGENTLEMEN | November 6, 2009 11:55 AM | Report abuse

jaxas said: "I don't get it Chris. Thre are a great many thoughhtful analyses on the opposite side of Ramesh Ponnurru yet, you choose to highlight his. I still gat a strong impression that you have become emotionally invested in this Palinization of the GOP.

"I often read Rameshs' blog and find him thoughtful as well. But he is also partisan to the point of having a tin ear. And so do you. You and others in the media fairly wallowed over the NY23rd race until the democrat won that race. Now you are dismissing this obvious defeat of the Palin wing of the GOP, dismissing the fact that democrats held their seats in special elections and by all indications in your column here, accepting whole hog the GOP interpretation of this election.

"When will you in the mainstream media get off this odd entracement you have with the far right?"

----
I agree with you up to a point. It's not that journalists have a particular bias towards the right - and for you Fox News people towards the left - but rather they have a desire to frame everything as an exciting story. Yes, last week the Post or any other form of news media made you believe that NY-23 was the single most important election in the whole history of mankind! A story line like that will sell papers, create web hits and attrack viewers. Now this week the focus is on what were really two foregone conclusion governorship races, one with a horrible campaign (Deeds) and the other with an incumbant with dismal approval ratings (Corzine). But now, as opposed to last week, the story is being framed as the GOP resurgent. You might think this was a bias towards one party but it is rather a bias towards the story line that can generate more talk and more articles. From a journalist's sentionalism-seeking point of view the results in NY-23 had a Democrat win - well that's so 2008. Been there, done that. Where's the hype, angst and drama in that? Now with a resurgent GOP storyline there's plenty of drama and builds up a sense on one side that the next election (and it is always about the next election to journalists) that they can sweep back into power and for the other side that have to worry that their long sought chance for power might be snatched away. That's almost Shakespearian in its epic drama potential than the lackluster "Oh, another Democrat wins." I suspect that if journalists had their way we would have Presidential elections every year with the party in power switching constantly.

Remember that earlier this year journalists and the media talking heads were breathlessly theorizing that the 2008 elections mark the end of the GOP. Very dramatic! Just like in 2004 they breathlessly opined on the demise of the Democratic party. Both stories just reak in drama potentiality but unfortunately reality has a way of busting up all their hype.

Posted by: dre7861 | November 6, 2009 11:55 AM | Report abuse

I read the same article as Bsimon and must hope that the decent guy who refracts through his friend's prism is the one NJ will get in Trenton. The Rs are marginally less corrupt than the Ds in NJ according to folk wisdom.

I could not imagine voting for Corzine had I lived there, but I probably would have voted for Daggett.
But what do I know?
As many of you know, I voted for Perot. Probably bsimon did, too. ;-)

Posted by: mark_in_austin | November 6, 2009 11:54 AM | Report abuse

What I wonder with people like Bachman is, are they crazy? I mean crazy like a FOX, or just crazy? Why does she bother to lie about stuff like this?

'Around 4,000 right-wing activists showed up on Capitol Hill yesterday to protest reform. Last night on Fox News, Bachmann inflated the attendance numbers drastically. She also tried to paint the event as entirely grassroots, despite admitting that she had organized it:

BACHMANN: Today people told me they heard that call out on your show on Friday night, and they immediately started contacting other people. And this was totally word of mouth. This was nothing that we organized, nothing that we planned. We didn’t order one bus, one carload. Nothing. Complete word of mouth. And estimates are anywhere between 20 and 45,000 people had assembled. [...]

And also this absolutely outstanding grouping of people that we had today at the Capitol. This is organic. It was a meet up. It was spontaneous.'

'Bachmann’s claim is laughable. Aside from her leadership in organizing the protest, the corporate front group Americans For Prosperity helped coordinate. AFP mobilized about 40 buses to bring activists to DC, with AFP staffers standing at their designated bus drop off point near the Capitol, handing out signs, directions, talking points, petitions, and donuts to protesters. Moreover, notorious astroturf group FreedomWorks got involved in the action as well:

The protesters were fueled — literally and figuratively — by lobbying organizations like Americans for Prosperity and FreedomWorks, the groups behind the August town hall protests and “tea party” events. Freedomworks promoted this week’s event on their Web site DontKillGrandma.com with recommendations for protest tactics.

Moreover, AFP hosted Bachmann on a conference call the day before the rally to discuss their “House Call.”

“So you’re organizing and asking people to come meet you on the steps of the capital,” Fox host Sean Hannity asked Bachmann last Friday after her announcement. “Thursday at noon,” she said, “You can go to MicheleBachmann.com for more information.”

Chris, this is for you. I just want you to stop saying that all this stuff is grassroots, is 'angry populists.' What it is is the cynical manipulation by the insurance industry, through fear tactics, of gullible, credulous and foolish people.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 11:53 AM | Report abuse

Yay, go after Crist!
That's the best thing I've heard from teh Club For (Slow) Growth.
After tehir success in PA Senate and the NY Congress race, they should do that mopre often.

Posted by: F_L_Palmer | November 6, 2009 11:48 AM | Report abuse

Most folks seem to be focusing on CfG & Bachmann. I think the far more interesting fight is on the left--Paterson vs. Cuomo. Is Cuomo giving Paterson enough rope to hang himself or is this a case of dithering a la Mario. The last thing NY needs is a governor from Denmark. Sit or get off the pot.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | November 6, 2009 11:47 AM | Report abuse

fugitivenyc writes
"Christie might LOOK like a real Jersey boy, but he was VERY vague on how he would keep his promises. New Jersey voters took a leap of faith with Christie, because they were looking for ANY alternative to Corzine."

There's an op-ed in today's NYT by a longtime liberal friend of Christie's. It paints him a bit more sympathetically than the other coverage I've seen. Regarding the vagueness of Christie's promises, the author argues this is because Christie doesn't want to make promises he can't keep. Perhaps saying that during the campaign would have been appropriate.

From my perspective, if he's learned his lesson about impropriety with the fiasco surrounding his loan to a subordinate, it appears he may be set to do a reasonable job for NJ.

Posted by: bsimon1 | November 6, 2009 11:33 AM | Report abuse

Chris, you and Ponnuru are wrong about Dede Scozzafava. She is actually to the RIGHT of most New York Republicans on most issues, with the notable exceptions social issues like marriage equality and reproductive freedom. She is a bona fide FISCAL CONSERVATIVE.

Christie might LOOK like a real Jersey boy, but he was VERY vague on how he would keep his promises. New Jersey voters took a leap of faith with Christie, because they were looking for ANY alternative to Corzine.

Posted by: fugitivenyc | November 6, 2009 11:09 AM | Report abuse

The Club for Growth, I urge, should remain in their conservative roots but should put lots of money into a very few races and they all should be winnable races rather than spending vast resources on losing efforts. I think Florida, in support of the conservative Rubio, should be a definate race they should try to win: against Crist in the primary & Meeks in the GE. The Club should bow to political reality and stay out of certain states: Kirk (Ill), Ayotte (NH) as they are the folks that can win those races. But on the US Senate side, I think the Club can make an impact supporting Toomey in Pa. and Rubio in Florida. The Club should really only support candidates in races they can win. I am tired of the Club for Growth costing GOP seats.

Posted by: reason5 | November 6, 2009 10:59 AM | Report abuse

I urge you all to read Milbank's column about yesterday's Tea party event. Something really creepy is happening to Republicans. They are seriously turning into a cult -- no joke. That a US Rep could urge rowdy people to 'go get them!' meaning Dem members of Congress -- is chilling.

"But the best of Bachmann's recruits were a few rows into the crowd, holding aloft a pair of 5-by-8-foot banners proclaiming "National Socialist Healthcare, Dachau, Germany, 1945." Both banners showed close-up photographs of Holocaust victims, many of them children.

In the front of the protest, a sign showed President Obama in white coat, his face painted to look like the Joker. The sign, visible to the lawmakers as they looked into the cameras, carried a plea to "Stop Obamunism." A few steps farther was the guy holding a sign announcing "Obama takes his orders from the Rothchilds" [sic], accusing Obama of being part of a Jewish plot to introduce the antichrist.

The tone continued to the end, when Rep. John Carter (R-Tex.) beckoned to the House office buildings and shouted, "Go get 'em!" Some took him literally: Ten people were arrested at a sit-in at Pelosi's office in the Cannon Building, where they were crumpling up the health-care bill one page at a time."

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 10:42 AM | Report abuse

I hope they actually create a true "Conservative Party" and that it gains some power and some control, of course pushing the "Republican Party" to the middle. We are much better off with a three party system. I know it's far too early to really say that will ever happen, but a guy can dream. Enough of either wing trying to court the middle. Let the middle court itself!

Posted by: andygoldman | November 6, 2009 10:39 AM | Report abuse

I agree with everyone on the tragedy at Ft. Hood. It's hard to imagine the stresses undergone by a military psychiatrist being sent to a war zone.

I share condolences for the families.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 10:35 AM | Report abuse

Yeah, after what went on yesterday, it kind of numbs you to politics, doesn't it?

The guy actually went to med school at a place I used to work. I wonder if we ever crossed paths.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 10:24 AM | Report abuse

On Crist:
Is the FL primary open or closed? If open, a sound tactic for Crist might be to embrace the stimulus, thumb his nose at CfG and target those independent voters of which The Fix has recently become aware.

On Ryback:
Poster djah is overlooking RT's efforts to get President Obama elected which coincidentally helped expose him to the statewide DFL organization. RT & Margaret Anderson Kelliher are the DFLers to watch. My guess is RT is the DFL's best chance to retake the governorship. For one thing, he shares a lot of characteristics with Gov Pawlenty - likeability & even-toned, moderate speaking patterns. He's not an excessively partisan figure & worked well with Gov Pawlenty following the 35W collapse. I think he'll be tough to beat, if the DFLers are sensible enough to nominate him.

Posted by: bsimon1 | November 6, 2009 10:11 AM | Report abuse

Club for Growth leading "The Fix" again?

Chris, CFG is a lobbying group that engages in propaganda. Nothing wrong with that; but is it appropriate to allow such groups to set your agenda so often lately?

***

THE FORT HOOD AMAZING COINCIDENCES:
SEN. FEINSTEIN TALKING ABOUT 'INFILTRATION OF OUR MILITARY.'
ECHOES OF 9-11?

Apparently, the rest of my post, an expanded version of a comment I made last night here on the thread "The Most Important Number in Politics Today," triggered what I consider blatant censorship or prior restraint of publication (if the post should suddenly appear here).

This telecommunications interference appears to be the work of U.S. government surveillance operatives at the regional "fusion center" in Newtown, PA, who apparently have (unjustly) targeted this veteran journalist.

It appears this operation has been inserting so-called "spoofed pages" into the data stream of my internet connection, allowing the interception or censoring of my internet telecommunications, including political speech.

It is interesting that this apparent censorship becomes blatant the morning after a high-profile event like the Fort Hood massacre.

I fear that our nation may be in the incipient stages of a silent coup. This is not just rhetoric. When the political speech of one supposedly free citizen is infringed upon, the rights of all Americans are in jeopardy.

I urge "Fix" readers to take the time to read my comment on the "Most Important Number in Politics Today" thread, posted last night. Then, please read this:

http://nowpublic.com/world/govt-tortures-me-silent-microwave-weapons-ousted-s-prez AND http://NowPublic.com/scrivener RE: "GESTAPO USA"

Please note the most recent comments I have posted to the article about the microwave radiation torture of deposed Honduras President Manuel Zelaya.

Posted by: scrivener50 | November 6, 2009 9:30 AM | Report abuse

I have to agree with jaxas. Jax, I think what we are seeing is the Foxification of the media. Or the drudgeification. The MSM sees the screamers and whiners and propagandists draw a big crowd.

What the MSM doesn't get however, is that it's a very stupid crowd.

Ever see the movie Idiocracy? It's a lot like that. The dumbing down of America. Everyone I know from other countries is astonished at the low caliber of candidates on the right and their godawful lack of understanding of even the simplest aspects of governance.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 9:17 AM | Report abuse

I don't get Charlie Crist, I am not a fan of his but...

He should just own up to the stimulus and say:

"yeah, I accepted it, it was the right thing to do at the time, it helped the citizens of Florida and if I had to do it again, I would in a heartbeat. Florida citizens pay federal taxes and I brought some of OUR money back to the state of Florida"

the more he tries to backtrack or pretend the stimulus never existed the more he sounds like a pandering idiot and the more of an issue nut groups like the Club for Growth make an issue of it.

Posted by: freethepresses | November 6, 2009 9:16 AM | Report abuse

here, pamela... it's Teabagger Theatre of the Absurd -- several people were arrested for unlawful entry and disorderly conduct.

'TPMDC happened upon a crowd that formed around two police vans as the protesters were prepared for "transporting," according to one officer there.

Without those official details, protesters in the crowd watching the arrests were furious. They shouted "Let them go!"

One woman told officers they were "shameful." Others called the arrested protesters "political prisoners."

"This is America, this is not the Soviet Union," one woman said.

Like a bad game of telephone, the crowd spread rumors without anyone having witnessed exactly what happened.

Several people said the group had been arrested for praying. Others said the group was arrested for ripping up pages from the nearly 2,000-page health care bill.

To show support for them, members of the crowd started ripping up their pages from the bill, which rally organizers had handed out for the purpose of reading them to members of Congress.

"Here's a piece of paper, I'm tearing it," one woman shouted as another joined in: "I tore a piece too!"

"Read your history books," another woman shouted at the officers.

"Thugs from Chicago," a man shouted at police.

"Arrest Nancy Pelosi for treason. You're arresting the wrong people," another shouted. "Arrest some real terrorists!"

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 9:09 AM | Report abuse

I don't get it Chris. Thre are a great many thoughhtful analyses on the opposite side of Ramesh Ponnurru yet, you choose to highlight his. I still gat a strong impression that you have become emotionally invested in this Palinization of the GOP.

I often read Rameshs' blog and find him thoughtful as well. But he is also partisan to the point of having a tin ear. And so do you. You and others in the media fairly wallowed over the NY23rd race until the democrat won that race. Now you are dismissing this obvious defeat of the Palin wing of the GOP, dismissing the fact that democrats held their seats in special elections and by all indications in your column here, accepting whole hog the GOP interpretation of this election.

When will you in the mainstream media get off this odd entracement you have with the far right?

Posted by: jaxas | November 6, 2009 9:07 AM | Report abuse

Do you predict the Health Care bill will pass or fail in the House on Saturday?

http://www.youpolls.com/details.asp?pid=6443


.

Posted by: usadblake | November 6, 2009 9:04 AM | Report abuse

Such a sad day. There is So much to say about the disaster at Fort Hood, but reading the comments sections at other sites/venues this morning has left me so horrified, I'll say nothing apart from expressing sorrow, deeply felt compassion for the victims and a redoubled hope for peace.

Posted by: shrink2 | November 6, 2009 9:03 AM | Report abuse

A comment on RT Rybek.
Chris,
You've been inside the Beltway too long. Being a resident of Minneapolis, to say nothing of being it's mayor, is the kiss of death in the governor's race. Its been 50 year or more. Rybek has no base outside Minneapolis and I'd put him in the middle of the pack.

Posted by: djah | November 6, 2009 8:38 AM | Report abuse

Chris, Nothing about Michele Bachman and her mission to take back Congress yesterday? Sadly for her, those efforts were overshadowed in the wake of yesterday's tragedy at Ft. Hood. However, it seems that she finally got the support of House Republican leaders - Boehner et al spoke at her event. I suppose, in the wake of NY 23, the theme is if you can't beat them, join them - at least long enough to keep the Club for Growth at bay.

Posted by: -pamela | November 6, 2009 8:19 AM | Report abuse

To borrow a classic line from Mister GOPAC himself, the one, the only NEWT GINGRICH:

"Pathetic Losers"..

Posted by: TOMHERE | November 6, 2009 7:56 AM | Report abuse

500+ men and women who had served at Hood gave their lives in Iraq and Afg. In a place where the cost of war is borne by the entire community - a place that bears the burdens for the rest of us - these killings from within strike an overwhelming emotional blow. My thoughts and prayers are 55 miles up the road today.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | November 6, 2009 7:23 AM | Report abuse

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