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Morning Fix: Biden as fundraiser in chief

1. Vice President Biden will be in Phoenix, Ariz. this morning to raise money for targeted Reps. Ann Kirkpatrick and Harry Mitchell just one day after he was in Las Vegas to raise cash for Nevada Rep. Dina Titus. All three House members represent competitive districts; Sen. John McCain (Ariz.) won Kirkpatrick's 1st with 54 percent and Mitchell's 5th with 51 percent while President Obama took 55 percent in Titus' 3rd. Biden has been a workhorse publicly and privately for vulnerable House Democrats so far this year; he boasted -- stunning, no? -- that he had visited 54 districts in 2009. Biden's presence in any district is sure to bring two things for a Democratic member or candidate: 1) money (and lots of it) and 2) press attention. Given that everywhere he goes Biden talks relentlessly about the jobs created by the stimulus plan, it's a win-win for the administration. They accrue chits with dozens of House members while pushing their job creation message in every nook and cranny of the country. And, a look at Biden's travels -- events for members in Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania -- shows the administration is firmly focused on the Rust Belt in 2010 and 2012.

2. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton appeared on "Meet the Press" on Sunday. Missed it? Here's what you need to know: 1) Clinton pledged not to "second guess any decision that the attorney general made" on trying Khalid Sheik Mohammed in New York. 2) About Afghan President Hamid Karzai she said: "He has his strengths and he has his weaknesses." 3) "I don't think I can overstate how damaged our country was in the eyes of people around the world when President Obama took office." 4) Clinton absolutely refused to take the bait on former Alaska governor Sarah Palin's new book, which is due out tomorrow. On Palin's proposal to have coffee, Clinton said she would do it. But, on Palin's politics, Clinton demurred: "I truly am out of commenting on, on politics. That is something that is not appropriate for the secretary of state."

3. Speaking of Palin, she was active on her Facebook page over the weekend -- using it to condemn the Obama administration's decision to try KSM (among others) in New York and rebut a stinging Associated Press story about the truthiness of some of the allegations contained in "Going Rogue." Palin called the story "opposition research" and added: "We'll keep setting the record straight, and we'll keep reminding some in the media that Americans are very tired of their non-objective reporting." The attacks on the media are like catnip to Palin's supporters -- more than 6,500 flagged their approval for the post and more than 2,000 comments (mostly supportive) were posted in less than 24 hours. For those who thought Palin's book tour would be an attempt to soften or moderate her image for the vast middle of the country -- and the electorate -- which is skeptical about her, the early returns suggest she is going in a very different direction. Again, be careful not to see "2012" in everything Palin is doing as we genuinely believe she has not made up her mind about a presidential bid.

4. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) will resign -- win or lose -- following her March 2 primary fight against Gov. Rick Perry (R), according to sources familiar with her thinking. After months of waffling about when she would leave the Senate, Hutchison said late last week she, in fact, wouldn't be leaving the Senate after all -- at least not until next spring. While Hutchison's allies sought to paint the choice as part and parcel of her desire to fight for the state, her long mulling process will be seen by many as the definition of indecisiveness. Assuming Hutchison stays true to her word and resigns next March, the special election to replace her, which is already very much under way, will be called in either May 2010 or in conjunction with the November 2010 general. An x-factor: Perry has broad discretion about when to call a special under an "emergency" provision in state law. And, depending on the outcome of the primary, Perry could be in an very unpredictable mood.

5. The White House got their man in Wisconsin over the weekend when Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett (D) announced he would seek the seat being vacated by Wisconsin Gov. Jim Doyle (D) in 2010. The Barrett candidacy brings to an end a significant behind-the-scenes battle within the Democratic party that had Lt. Gov. Barb Lawton in and then out of the race. Democrats believe Barrett's profile as mayor and the national attention he drew when he sought to stop an attack outside the state fair in August (Barrett was injured in the incident and continues to recuperate) will provide a solid foundation for a run. While Democrats were exuberant about Barrett's candidacy, his defeat in the 2002 primary against Doyle and his long contemplation of this race should be slightly worrisome. Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker, the preferred Republican nominee, came out of the gates on offense against Barrett: "If you like the big spending, big taxing policies of Jim Doyle, then you'll love Mayor Tom Barrett," said Keith Gilkes, campaign manager for Walker.

6. The Kansas City Star's Steve Kraske, the man so good he made the Fix's list of best political reporters in two different states, has penned a conventional-wisdom setting piece on the Kansas Senate primary between Republican Reps. Jerry Moran and Todd Tiahrt. The CW? The race is Moran's to lose. "The whispering among some members of the Kansas political class last week centered on whether Tiahrt would even remain in a race that now tilts decidedly uphill," wrote Kraske. Ouch. Moran's advantages: he represents roughly three quarters of the Sunflower State in his massive 1st district and he has a HUGE pot of money ($3.5 million on hand at the end of September) to spend on the race. Tiahrt's hope: His grassroots support among movement conservatives will mean a major organizational and turnout edge in next year's primary. With all that said, we don't make a habit of betting against Kraske.

7. Trouble is brewing in Colorado for Republicans with the news that former representative Tom Tancredo (R) is now likely to run for governor in 2010. Tancredo's interest comes in the wake of state Sen. Josh Penry's surprising decision to drop his candidacy last week. Penry's opt-out left former Rep. Scott McInnis, a noted moderate within the party, as the only serious Republican in the mix. Penry's hand was forced by the fact that much of the conservative money -- as well as former governor Bill Owens (R) -- had lined up, somewhat inexplicably, behind McInnis. Those money men will certainly stay with McInnis with Tancredo in the contest but the the latter's strong anti-immigration stance has turned him into a cult hero among grassroots conservatives. As always in politics, be careful what you wish for. . . .

8. There are only 22 days left in the Democratic primary fight for the Senate seat of the late Ted Kennedy, a stunningly low key affair that is almost certain to be won by state Attorney General Martha Coakley. Coakley has used her name identification and financial edge to turn this contest, which also features Rep. Mike Capuano, Boston Celtics owner Steve Pagliuca and City Year co-founder Alan Khazei, into a snooze. Pagliuca has done everything he can to make the race interesting -- from spending nearly $4 million of his own money to hammering Coakley and Capuano for their stances on a provision in the heath care bill that would eliminate federal funding for abortions.

9. Here's a tidbit from our Monday Fix column in the Post of which all 2010 candidates should make note: "In Pew Research Center's polling, just over half of Americans said they would like to see their own Member of Congress reelected next fall. Just over a third -- 34 percent -- said they want to see most incumbents reelected in the midterms."

10. Lou Dobbs told the Associated Press that his parting from CNN was "amicable." Added Dobbs: "I spent 29 years there building that company, and I wish everyone there nothing but the best, and they have reciprocated with me."

By Chris Cillizza  |  November 16, 2009; 5:45 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Fix  
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Next: The most important number in (Palin) politics today

Comments

You guys amaze me - For weeks you flood the media with negative stories literally about everything Obama. Then you do a poll and for the next week all you talk about is the results of the poll and then countless articles are written about the falling popularity of the President even though his popularity doesn't really fall but the approval rating of his programs and initiatives is what is falling. Meanwhile, we are supposed to only focus on the negatives you write about and not think about what you are doing to manipulate the negative responses and you do it week after week. When you only get your stories from "FIX NEWS" and all your featured articles stem from your manipulation of the news, what do you think most of think of you? Keeping pi..... down our backs, do you think we will eventually think its rain? Do you really care so little about our country?

Posted by: mcgeenate | November 17, 2009 11:58 AM | Report abuse

To no-debris,

I'm sorry you took my comment the wrong way. I was actually talking about the Weltanschauung by the 'freedom fries' and even Reagan crowd.

Indeed, the mid-WWII and pre-Cold War politicos were very nuanced and sophisticated (also well-travelled, which helps, I think).

Even Nixon, although it will probably set off a firestorm, was quite 'worldwise'. No offence meant.

Posted by: sverigegrabb | November 16, 2009 6:41 PM | Report abuse

I remember the BIDEN/PALIN 'debate' and how the media touted his 25yrs of foreign policy experience as the perfect compliment to the Obama campaign; and how Palin was a dunce who could 'see' Russia from her window--and it turned out she could!

MY, MY, MY how the times have changed.

The OBAMA regime has moved Biden as far away from foreign policy as the Clintons did in moving Gore out of the White House---anyone got a copy of his 'EFFICIENCY' report.

Meanwhile Palin has turned into a major shaker and mover; raising cash by the tens of thousands.

Suppose we compare Biden & Palin on their fund raising ability...who do you think would win?

Posted by: Common_Cents1 | November 16, 2009 6:40 PM | Report abuse

The Wingnut Civil War is breaking out all over the country, and it's anything but 'civil.'

Posted by: drindl

-----------------------------------------
Is this a reference to the lib reaction to Palin's book?

Posted by: leapin | November 16, 2009 6:00 PM | Report abuse

Anyone catch Uncle Joe on SNL? He's ready for the responsibility.

Posted by: leapin | November 16, 2009 5:51 PM | Report abuse

The lunatics don't understand why the public doesn't like lynch mobs.

Posted by: drindl

---------------------------------------
Except ones going after Sarah Palin. The hypocrisy of today's NeoCom Statist Destructionist Party members.

Posted by: leapin | November 16, 2009 5:38 PM | Report abuse

"requires a more nuanced 'Weltanschauung' than the isolationist provincialism of that distant era."

The WWII generation was far more sophisticated in foreign relations than this new generation of proudly ignorant know-nothings.

Posted by: nodebris

I feel this attitude comes from the might makes me right mentality. America is the stongest nation on earth therefore we do and act has we wish.

Posted by: ModerateVoter | November 16, 2009 2:05 PM | Report abuse

"requires a more nuanced 'Weltanschauung' than the isolationist provincialism of that distant era."

The WWII generation was far more sophisticated in foreign relations than this new generation of proudly ignorant know-nothings.

Posted by: nodebris | November 16, 2009 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Just a shoehorned-in comment between the endless snowbama comments:

I spent part of my childhood in Japan, speak Japanese fluently, have many Japanese friends, and once I graduated from journalism school spent several years back there as an adult. Therefore I know the Japanese people and culture VERY well.

The Japanese would view President Obama's bowing ('o-jigi suru' in Japanese) as a great sign of respect to their culture. It's the breathtaking arrogance and 'yahoo-ism' (lc 'y') of recent cowboy politicians which offends them and, I might add, most of the other countries which America NEEDS to help achieve its international aims.

This is an internationalised world now, unlike in certain commentators ever-more-distant post-WWII youth, and requires a more nuanced 'Weltanschauung' than the isolationist provincialism of that distant era.

I'm glad Obama, at least, seems to be aware of that.

Posted by: sverigegrabb | November 16, 2009 1:20 PM | Report abuse

Barry caught bowing and scraping to foreign leaders again. Can he retroactivly surrender to Japan when he apologizes for bombing them.

Posted by: snowbama | November 16, 2009 8:49 AM | Report abuse

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

JAPANESE CULTURE IS ONE OF BOWING. SOME GIVE A KISS ON BOTH CHEEKS. SOME SHAKE HANDS. GET IT? SHOWS RESPECT. AT LEAST THE PRESIDENT DIDN'T BARF ALL OVER THEM.

A HOPE TO GAWD THAT KINKY RUNS FOR GOVERNOR!

EVERY TIME I'VE WRITTEN TO HUCHINSON OVER THE YEARS I GET THE SAME OLE SAME OLE GOP REPLY. NEVER MIND WHAT MY FAMILY WANTS HER TO STAND FOR...A PAT ON THE HEAD AND A GO AWAY LITTLE GAL. HUCHINSON/CORNYN AND PERRY ARE OF THE SAME CLOTH. HUCHINSON/CORNYN GIVE/GAVE A BLANK CHECK TO WHATEVER BUSH/CHENEY PROPOSED.

WORTH THE TIME TO READ:

http://www.searchlightmagazine.com/index.php?link=template&story=295

Posted by: DEBWOOD1948 | November 16, 2009 12:40 PM | Report abuse

MV -- I still think of the Tea Baggers as being in the tradition of lynch mobs, unfortunately a very American phenomonen.

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 11:34 AM | Report abuse

"The Danville TEA Party Patriots, a group that has courted controversy by planning to burn Rep. Tom Perriello (D-VA) and Speaker Nancy Pelosi at a rally this Saturday, may be having second thoughts.

"We've been getting a lot of flack about this," Danville TEA Party chairman Nigel Coleman told the Lynchburg News & Advance, "about burning those two in effigy and a lot of people in the public are unhappy about it. The story has gotten so large, it's kinda strange."


The lunatics don't understand why the public doesn't like lynch mobs.

Posted by: drindl


I tend to associate this activity with radical Muslims. All those years seeing Bush burned that way on TV did it. Funny how the Teabaggers do not see that.

Posted by: ModerateVoter | November 16, 2009 11:24 AM | Report abuse

The people who follow Palin, Beck, Limbaugh and Dick Armey with his silly little army of tea baggers and town criers are essentially the same sort of people who were in David Kresh's cult following--or any of a number of past cult leaders who prey on the ignorance and stupidity that seems to so characterize America's rural areas.

I leve in one of those rural areas in Utah and you simply cannot believe the ignorance and stupidity. These people will believe the most asinine, ridiculous lies the right wing pundits spread about Obama. These are the same sort who actually buy into the 2012 doomsday phenomenon. When that day passes and nothing happens, they will forget how passionately they believed it and simply fall into the next wild, doomsday prophecy or wild conspiracy theory floated by their fav talk show dumbo.

Posted by: jaxas | November 16, 2009 11:19 AM | Report abuse

"The Danville TEA Party Patriots, a group that has courted controversy by planning to burn Rep. Tom Perriello (D-VA) and Speaker Nancy Pelosi at a rally this Saturday, may be having second thoughts.

"We've been getting a lot of flack about this," Danville TEA Party chairman Nigel Coleman told the Lynchburg News & Advance, "about burning those two in effigy and a lot of people in the public are unhappy about it. The story has gotten so large, it's kinda strange."


The lunatics don't understand why the public doesn't like lynch mobs.

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 11:07 AM | Report abuse

U.S. CENSORS THE NET AS OBAMA LECTURES CHINA ON NET CENSORSHIP

• How a thwarted attempt to post a comment to today's "Fix" subverts Obama's message to Chinese students on the human right to freedom of expression.

http://nowpublic.com/u-s-censors-net-obama-lectures-china-net-censorship

OR (if rogue operatives corrupt the link): http://NowPublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener50 | November 16, 2009 11:01 AM | Report abuse

she loved the ceremonial aspects while she dodged the real work.

Barry is a man. refer to him as he.

Posted by: snowbama | November 16, 2009 10:53 AM | Report abuse

Palin/Prejean

I haven’t seen many comments about the similarities in the behavior of these two beauty queens.

Both expect to be treated with deference by journalists, and accuse the most milquetoast of old, male interviewers of bias.

They’re both conservative fundamentalist megachurch attendees.

Much of what they say is later proven to be a lie.

Both quit their day job to cash in.

Both have big skeletons in their closets, if you believe Levi Johnston.

Both have a gay blogger nemesis.

I think if you try to understand Palin as a beauty queen, it really explains her behavior as AK Gov—it was just a title to her, and she loved the ceremonial aspects while she dodged the real work. That’s also why I don’t really take her seriously as a candidate. She’s never going to do the work to win enough primaries to get the GOP nomination. Her campaign will look a lot like Rudy Guiliani’s—well financed, based on a few minutes of fame, and ultimately unable to engage with primary voters.

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 10:49 AM | Report abuse

Last month, 30 Republican senators voted against Sen. Al Franken’s (D-MN) amendment that would punish defense contractors “if they restrict their employees from taking workplace sexual assault, battery and discrimination cases to court.” His amendment was inspired by Jamie Leigh Jones, who was gang-raped by her co-workers while working for Halliburton/KBR in Baghdad in 2005, and then had to fight her employer for justice.

The GOP senators who sided with defense contractors at the expense of women — such as John Thune (SD) — have been facing an intense backlash. David Vitter (LA) refused to give a rape victim a straight answer when she confronted him about his vote, claiming that he is “absolutely supportive of any [rape] case like that being prosecuted criminally to the full extent of the law.”

Politico reports that Republicans are now scratching their heads at why the public is so incensed about their “no” votes:

Privately, GOP sources acknowledge that they failed to anticipate the political consequences of a “no” vote on the amendment. And several aides said that Republicans are engaged in an internal blame game about why they agreed to a roll-call vote on the measure, rather than a simple voice vote that would have allowed the opposing senators to duck criticism.

As BarbinMD writes, “Seriously? They voted against an amendment that was prompted by the brutal gang-rape of a young woman by her co-workers while she was working for a company under contract for the United States government, after which she was locked in a shipping container without food or water, threatened if she left to seek medical treatment, and was then prevented from bringing criminal charges against her assailants. And they failed to anticipate the political consequences?”

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 10:48 AM | Report abuse

Over the summer, one of the GOP’s loudest complaints against health care legislation was a provision offering senior citizens Medicare reimbursement for end-of-life counseling. Republicans claimed it would create so-called “death panels” or urge seniors citizens to die. RNC Chairman Michael Steele “endorsed this type of rhetoric, and on July 28, the RNC put out research document claiming that the government would “dictate” Americans’ “end-of-life care.”

But ThinkProgress has noticed that Cigna, the RNC’s health insurance provider, also urges beneficiaries to think about end-of-life services. Cigna’s website has a page called “Care at the End of Life,” which covers topics such as how to talk with “loved ones” about “end-of-life choices” and whether to stop life-prolonging treatment:

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 10:47 AM | Report abuse

ROFLOL--

LIZ CHENEY: You could also look at the comparison and think, Cheney 2012.

WALLACE: Really?! How far do you want to go with that?

KRISTOL: Let Liz make news. Cheney/Palin.

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 10:45 AM | Report abuse

truthful rewrite (just trying to help)

""My greatest strength as a leftist loon has always been an ability to 'reach out and insult someone' — to relate to the Kos audience, get inside the voices in my head and address my kooky koncerns. With deep BS piled high across a broad range of categories, I can take complex material — technological, financial/insurance, pharmaceutical — and confuse it in a nasty, braindead — and of course — chanting, manner.""

My grammar needs work, as does my punctuation but I am after all, a "writer" with no education. Most of the complex things I take are actually pharm cocktails to keep me out of the pokey.

Love always - the Hag on the Hudson

Posted by: snowbama | November 16, 2009 10:45 AM | Report abuse

Sarah palin is either getting dumber, or is pretending to be dumber than she is -- in order to reach the infantile level of the goper base:

'In the past, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin has been cagey about her views on creationism and evolution, saying that she believes “we have a creator” but she didn’t want “to pretend I know how all this came to be.” But in her new memoir, Going Rogue, Palin apparently writes that she doesn’t believe in evolution. New York Times reviewer Michiko Kakutani writes:

Elsewhere in this volume, she talks about creationism, saying she “didn’t believe in the theory that human beings — thinking, loving beings — originated from fish that sprouted legs and crawled out of the sea” or from “monkeys who eventually swung down from the trees.” In everything that happens to her, from meeting Todd to her selection by Mr. McCain for the Republican ticket, she sees the hand of God: “My life is in His hands. I encourage readers to do what I did many years ago, invite Him in to take over.”

While running for governor in 2006, Palin said that she was “a proponent of teaching both” evolution and creationism in Alaska’s schools. ” In September 2008, she told Fox News’ Sean Hannity that because she grew up “in a school teacher’s house with a science teacher as a dad,” she has “great respect for science being taught in our science classes and evolution to be taught in our science classes.”

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 10:43 AM | Report abuse

Why do you hate this country so much that you WANT things to go wrong?
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

no, I did not vote for the Democrat.

Posted by: snowbama | November 16, 2009 10:38 AM | Report abuse

"just over half of Americans said they would like to see their own Member of Congress reelected next fall. Just over a third -- 34 percent -- said they want to see most incumbents reelected in the midterms."

Isn't that what such polls always show, Chris? I thought it was a permanent feature of US politics that most Americans think Congress stinks, with the exception of their own representatives. Thus the long-term and mutually contradictory trends of Americans hating Congress coupled with a huge advantage for incumbents.

Posted by: nodebris | November 16, 2009 10:37 AM | Report abuse

the photos say it all. how low can you go? Barry is the limbo king.


http://hotairpundit.blogspot.com/2009/11/president-obama-vs-rest-of-world.html

Posted by: snowbama | November 16, 2009 10:30 AM | Report abuse

My greatest strength as a writer/marketer has always been an ability to 'reach out and touch someone' — to relate to a target audience, get inside their heads and address their concerns. With deep experience across a broad range of categories, I can take complex material — technological, financial/insurance, pharmaceutical — and present it in a friendly, informative — and of course — persuasive, manner.

ROLFLMAO

someone please help.

Posted by: snowbama | November 16, 2009 10:29 AM | Report abuse

Andy -- The Axis of Evil -- Wingnut Media/Armey-Industry Astroturf/Norquist Tax Deadbeats -- may not have come out for perry, but they don't have to. He's already a 'cult hero' in his own right.

And here comes the Wingnut Civil War!

"Florida is a hill to die on for conservatives," said Erick Erickson, editor of the conservative blog RedState.com, “Charlie Crist must be destroyed.”

"What's going to happen, the voters are going to weed out these Republicans who no longer share the core principles that make our country great," Mr. DeMint said.

'In a California Senate primary that promises to be just as intense as this one, conservatives are championing Chuck DeVore, a state assemblyman, over Carly Fiorina, '

and...

"A Quinnipiac University poll late last month showed Mr. Crist beating Mr. Rubio, 50 percent to 35 percent, and the presumed Democratic candidate, Representative Kendrick B. Meek, 51 to 31 percent. The poll also showed Mr. Meek beating Mr. Rubio, 36 to 33 percent."

The entire rightwing wackjob movement is coming out to undermine Crist. Dems won't have to lift a finger.

Voila -- When this war is over, dems will be the only folks left standing.

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 10:25 AM | Report abuse

The PEW poll cited by Cillizza must be a cold splash of water in the face of the GOP who were hoping for a 1994 style sweep. If the sentiment indicated in that poll holds--that over half the respondents want to see their incumbent re-elected--then the sweeping gains republicans were hoping for seems a bit exaggerated.

The most likely scenario is that while republicans make make minor gains, they will not be able to take back either chamber. And the deeper trouble they have for the future is structural and has to do with a growing demographic that is not favorable for them.

This could all change of course if the democrats don't wise up and take jobs and fiscal sovereignty--a phrase you will be hearing a lot of in the coming weeks--more seriously than they have up to this point.

Posted by: jaxas | November 16, 2009 10:21 AM | Report abuse

Mark,
Is there some sort of underground growing conservative push against Hutchinson that isn't getting talked about on the national stage? For example has Palin/Dick Armey etc fundraised for Perry?

Posted by: AndyR3 | November 16, 2009 10:06 AM | Report abuse

'the latter's strong anti-immigration stance has turned him into a cult hero among grassroots conservatives.'

Most likely inadvertent, but you finally hit the nail on the head, CC. You can't have a cult hero without a cult, can't you?

it's time to acknowledge that's the the modern 'conservative' movement has become.

The Wingnut Civil War is breaking out all over the country, and it's anything but 'civil.'

Posted by: drindl | November 16, 2009 10:00 AM | Report abuse

Snowy, the vaccine is here in Pennsylvania: the kids in my school district are all getting shots or flonase this week.

Why do you hate this country so much that you WANT things to go wrong? The shootings last week must have thrilled you.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | November 16, 2009 9:46 AM | Report abuse

shrink, I know she is counting on the TX R Women's Federation [TFRW] a great deal. But she had TFRW anyway.

Campaigning across TX she could have pointed out all the military base work she has done in specific terms. These include making Brooke Army Hospital at Ft. Sam Houston in SA the hub of all Army hospitals, making Ft. Sam the regional command, and expanding the mission at Ft. Bliss enough to make 50,000 jobs in EP.

She has shared large responsibility for the bill that made state tax deductible on Fed tax, and for the bill removing the "marriage penalty". She led the consortium of SW senators who quadrupled the Border Patrol and got fed funds for local drug enforcement on the border. And more. As a senior senator she has done stuff for TX that she could push in every area of the state, if she went to every area of the state, that is.

So yep, this is the worst case scenario, for her, IMO.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | November 16, 2009 9:31 AM | Report abuse

Mark, I think I remember a few months ago you posted this KBH choice/gamble, which seems to be playing out in reality, as the "nightmare scenario" for a Goodhair victory.

Posted by: shrink2 | November 16, 2009 8:55 AM | Report abuse

If you look deeper into the top ten at three of them are about the divisions in the GOP. Huthinson's apparent missteps in the race against Perry are very suprising to me. I figured that he was a dead man walking, but as Mark said don't count good hair out until the votes have been counted.

The Trancedo candidacy is something the GOP would like to avoid like the plague. Any GOP thinker worth his or her salt will tell you that anti-immigrant stances may sound good in the short term but they will kill the party in the long-run. Tancredo is the poster-boy for that movement and he will at the very least bring the immigration fight back into the forefront, which is something the republicans would like to avoid at least until after the 2010 elections.

Posted by: AndyR3 | November 16, 2009 8:51 AM | Report abuse

Barry caught bowing and scraping to foreign leaders again. Can he retroactivly surrender to Japan when he apologizes for bombing them.

Posted by: snowbama | November 16, 2009 8:49 AM | Report abuse

Sounded to me that Hillary admitted the
present ident has no idea what to do in Afghanistan. Why should it be any different than everything else, the economy for example. All those who think another summit is the answer, raise your hand.

I noticed Barry failed to decide on gitmo and pawned it off on the AG. How many decisions can he punt.

Where are the vaccines? Barry dithers with record travel while at home ineptness rules the day

Posted by: snowbama | November 16, 2009 8:16 AM | Report abuse

Democrats need to get over their depression and figure out how to stop the trend of white nationalism alive and well and growing here in the USA. The GOP once again has been able to put Dem's on the ropes with their hit squad style of propoganda that the majority of Americans are naieve (read Lemings) enough to once again believe. The Bush/Cheney GOP ran this country into the ditch AND NOW THE IMPATIENT AMERICANS ARE DEMANDING IMMEDIATE CHANGES. 2920+ days versus -300 days of OBAMA/BIDEN.

PALIN AND THE WHOLE DICK ARMEY CROWD ARE A SCARY GROUP OF WHITE NATIONALIST'S..WHITE NATIONALISM IS/HAS BEEN ON THE RISE IN THE USA. WE ARE DAMNED BY OUR PAST IF WE ARE TOO STUPID TO LEARN THAT A PERSONS SKIN COLOR OR RELIGIOUS FAITH, ETC DOESN'T REPRESENT THAT PERSONS HEART/SOUL.

GOOGLE SEARCHLIGHT MAGAZINE FOR STARTERS.

PEACE.


Posted by: DEBWOOD1948 | November 16, 2009 7:50 AM | Report abuse

Hillary was out there this weekend showing the way for Democrats. Not for a minute should Dems let the public forget who got us into the fiscal and foreign policy mess we now must pay for. The GOP has no credibility and their bleating should be ignored. They are screaming because Obama dares to find ways to repair the damage they have done. A hefty surcharge on higher incomes would be just what they deserve.

Posted by: mcknight131 | November 16, 2009 7:30 AM | Report abuse

Hillary was out there this weekend showing the way for Democrats. Not for a minute should Dems let the public forget who got us into the fiscal and foreign policy mess we now must pay for. The GOP has no credibility and their bleating should be ignored. They are screaming because Obama dares to find ways to repair the damage they have done. A hefty surcharge on higher incomes would be just what they deserve.

Posted by: mcknight131 | November 16, 2009 7:30 AM | Report abuse

When I received KBH's letter, which did not say "March" but which was couched in terms of permitting her to vote against health care and against cap-and-trade, I thought the strategy was ill conceived. Her gamble must be that the D govrace will be so lackluster that she will still draw the x-over votes she needs in the R primary against Goodhair.

Her appointed replacement would cast the same votes as she would on these two bills so I read reluctance to engage in heavy duty campaigning as the real motive.
Staying to cast those votes is aimed at the R faithful, not the x-overs. There is no % in this move.

While the perception that she will lose to Goodhair by having squandered a 20 point poll lead is increasing, the vulnerable Rick will have to draw a stronger D than the current field - or else Schieffer or Gilbert or the hair products guy with the big bucks will have to set an unlikely prairie fire.

As for the game of musical chairs, see:

http://www.texastribune.org/stories/2009/nov/13/kbh-wont-resign-run/

RR Commish Williams, if he is Goodhair's appointed interim, will be TX's first black U.S. Senator. That honor should have been Barbara Jordan's, may she rest in peace.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | November 16, 2009 7:23 AM | Report abuse

people have to be really stupid to reelect or elect any dem to office...
they are in the process of destroying our country and doing nothing and I mean nothing about American jobs and you think they deserve to be reelected...
hey people wake up before it's too late...

Posted by: DwightCollins | November 16, 2009 7:13 AM | Report abuse

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