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Fix Pick: Being Bobby Jindal


Is Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal the next Republican presidential nominee? Photo by Pat Semansky -- Getty Images

INDIAN WELLS, Calif. -- Regular Fix readers know that we believe any conversation about the future faces of the Republican Party has to begin with Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal.

Jindal is the hottest commodity in Republican politics these days thanks to his youth (he's 37), his resume (Rhodes scholar, congressman, governor) and his obvious fresh-faced appeal (he's Indian American.)

And now he's starting to get a lot of buzz in the national press.

Witness Michael Leahy's piece in Saturday's Post where, set to a "Cedar Rapids" dateline, Leahy casts Jindal as the Republican answer to President-elect Barack Obama and an all-but-announced candidate for the 2012 GOP presidential nomination.

Leahy writes:

"Jindal is, above all else, a political meteor, sharing Obama's precocious skills for reaching the firmament in a hurry. It was just four years ago, after losing a gubernatorial election, that he won election to Congress, and only this year that he became Louisiana's governor, the first nonwhite to hold the office since Reconstruction. And now, 10 months into his first term, the talk of a presidential bid is getting louder among his boosters."

Leahy adds that Jindal received a warm reception from a group of conservatives gathered in the Queen City who seemed convinced that he was planning to run for president despite his protestations to the contrary.

Even in denying his interest, however, Jindal previewed what could be a compelling, Obama-like message if he does decide to seek national office. "I think the American people are tired of campaigns and politics," Jindal said. "We need to get behind our new president and our new Congress, support them, and stop being Democrats and Republicans."

For those of you already salivating about the 2012 race -- and who isn't? -- this is a must-read piece about a man who will almost certainly be heard from over the coming months and years.

By Chris Cillizza  |  November 30, 2008; 10:00 AM ET
Categories:  Fix Picks , Republican Party  
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Comments

Bobby Jindal did not advocate legislation for the teaching of creationism. He simply made it possible for teachers, like myself, to answer student questions concerning the issue without fear of lawsuits. Students have questions about these issues, and teachers were forced to keep their mouths shut because of fear of lawsuits. Governor Jindal has a degree in Biology... of course he understands science. As for the exorcism, people watch too many movies. When a priest comes to bless your home, which is common in the highly Catholic New Orleans area, he is performing an exorcism. Not so dramatic as hollywood.
Young professionals, Democrats and Republicans, in Louisiana voted for Jindal because we love our state and believe he will help Louisiana reach its greatest potential.

Posted by: tudorbritain | December 6, 2008 9:26 AM | Report abuse

Who cares about he 2012 campaign? There is much work to be done in the next four years to repair some of the damage that eight years of a disastrous Republican administration have left behind.

Posted by: Gatsby1 | December 2, 2008 4:09 AM | Report abuse

Living in Louisiana. What a paradox. Obama gets 1/3 of the Louisiana votes, Jindal gets over 50 percent. You just cant figure voters at least here in America's very own and very real Banana Republic. Jindal has been ho-hum so far as Governor. Dodged a bullet earlier this year when he finally vetoed a tremendous raise that the state Legislature voted itself after first saying he would pass it. And now he's out on the hustings. He's got a ways to go to prove himself presidential material.

Posted by: rawreid | December 1, 2008 6:25 PM | Report abuse

What the DNC and Alaska and Louisiana democratic committees need to start doing in looking who they'll run in 2010 against Sarah Palin (not Eric Croft) and in 2011 against Bobby Jindal. Despite Palin's and Jindal's respective popularity within their homestates, neither is infallible in their gubernatorial re-election. So if a real strong and popular democrat runs against them and they both lost their re-election bids, then the wind is really taken out of their sails. Plus the democrat opponent really has a simple campaign slogan "I actually want to our great state's governor and I'll be actual be in (Juneau or Baton Rouge) working hard each and every day as your governor and the imcumbent Gov. (Palin or Jindal) is going to spend year fundraising for president in Manhattan or Beverly Hills and anywhere else that will donate a buck..."

Posted by: Corey_NY | December 1, 2008 5:23 PM | Report abuse

I cannot see how a party that embraced a tacitly racist message in 2008 that conjured up ties to Islam and terrorism out of whole cloth could possibly turn on a dime and nominate an Indian (as if their constituency even knows the difference betwee India, Pakistan and Iran). Bobby Jindal's day may well come, but if it is to head the GOP, it will be years -- maybe decades -- past 2012.

Posted by: gbooksdc | December 1, 2008 2:42 PM | Report abuse

It's way too soon to speculate on 2012. In my mind, the governor's & senate races in 2010 are much more of a political issue (redistricting maps are huge!) than the Presidency in 2012. Let Barack Obama have a shot to govern, as he just named his National Security team today. Kudos to Obama for leaving Gates as Sec. of Defense. Bad move on choosing H Clinton to Sec. of state. Anyhow, this article is about Bobby Jindal.

To me, he is a very impressive man. Unlike most politicians, Jindal is an intellectual. A Rhodes Scholar is the governor of Louisiana. A state known for shrimp boats, racism & rednecks has a governor who is Indian by birth and a Rhodes Scholar. Not exactly the brand the state of Louisiana is accustomed to. At age 37, Jindal's past is very bright with an even brighter future ahead of him. It was a gift for Jindal that he was not McCain's VP candidate. Instead, he focused on his job as governor of La. He handled the hurricane well over the R convention, as that was set up well. He has alot more governing to do right now. Jindal's term isn't up until 2011, then he will be up for re-election. As intelligent as Jindal is, I wouldn't think he has any preconceived notions of 2012, yet. It is likely best for Jindal, being 37, to concentrate on governing in La. and then winning re-election in 2011. Then, if Obama is doing well in 2012 and is approved of highly then Jindal should stay where he is as gov. of La but if Obama is struggling alot and his term is corrupted then perhaps Jindal would run in 2012. It's too early to say. However, right now, Jindal sits in a very nice spot.

Posted by: reason5 | December 1, 2008 1:58 PM | Report abuse

The Fix writes
"Jindal previewed what could be a compelling, Obama-like message if he does decide to seek national office. "I think the American people are tired of campaigns and politics," Jindal said. "We need to get behind our new president and our new Congress, support them, and stop being Democrats and Republicans." "

Gov Jindal is smart to play it bipartisan right now. He has two years to decide whether to seek higher office yet. The savvy candidates will gauge the merits of a 2012 run after taking the electorate's temperature in the mid-terms. If Obama is well-liked at that time, a young Jindal would be smarter to play for 2016 - when he'd be a still very-young 45 - rather than shooting his wad too soon, as a 41 year old whippersnapper.

Posted by: bsimon1 | December 1, 2008 1:17 PM | Report abuse

NO. We are NOT salivating about the 2012 race. That drooling is being waged by the Repugs who can't get over being 'whupped' by an up-and-comer that they didn't see coming.

Obama won because of his combination of brains and vision, not because he's black. He has INSPIRED people of all stripes. He's not even in office yet, but Cillizza would have him already running for a second term against Jindal, who's still in his first year as governor .

Instead, let's use Jindal's own words to set the 11-08 context appropriately: "I think the American people are tired of campaigns and politics. We need to get behind our new president and our new Congress, support them, and stop being Democrats and Republicans."

Posted by: bweyand1 | December 1, 2008 12:10 PM | Report abuse

Are Indian-Americans non-white?

Posted by: BPINZ | December 1, 2008 11:57 AM | Report abuse

The whole idea that Republican "leadership" believes or even entertains the idea that Obama won the election as some sort of deranged affirmative action gesture stands as proof of just how remote reality is for them.Obama won the election in spite of the color of his skin, not because of it, and the Republicans tried very hard to make race an determinative issue in this election, but failed. Turning to Jindal is just a way for them to deny their failure, to run from reality even faster.

Just to be clear, creationism is not science. It is not based on directly-observable evidence; it is not based on reproducible experimentation; it does not follow scientific method to reach its conclusions. ID is not science, it is sophistry.

Putting people who can't, or won't, think straight into positions of great responsibility falls into the "dangerously stupid" category. We now have the history of the 2007-2009 mortgage meltdown coming to light, and we learn that competent, pragmatic people do exist within the Bush administration, and that they tried to enact regulations that would have mitigated or even prevented the mortgage meltdown. Those attempts to save the US economy from disaster were quashed by the Bush administration's political toadies because the Bush administration clung dogmatically to its free-market idealism even in the face of imminent disaster.

This is the kind of thinking that put us in the trouble we're in now. When dogma overrules pragmatism and faith overrides reason, the American people are sacrificed. Faith-based economics is nothing more than an invitation to institutionalize graft, and faith-based education would be a mandate of ignorance and superstition. Can't we all just get sane?

Posted by: lonquest | December 1, 2008 10:11 AM | Report abuse










One thing to note is that Jindal is a decent speaker, but he isn't close to the orator that Obama is. I think Republicans are missing the point if they simply focus on Jindal because he is young and not white.








Posted by: DDAWD | December 1, 2008 8:33 AM | Report abuse

McCain was in the senate, which, last I checked, hasn't passed legislation advocating creationism. LA did on Bobby's watch and with his support. The attack add practically rights itself. You've got: crazy religious sponsers saying that this law was for the intent of getting god into biology classrooms, research dependent on evolutionary theory being done world wide constantly and perpetual fears that the US education system is failing.

ID is a very fringe movement in this country when more people stop to consider the matter. Look at Kansas. It's one of the most conservative states in the union and two of it's ten seats were won in 2006 on the explicit platform of repealing the creationist laws passed by the incumbents.

Believing creationism will be accepted by the vast majority of Americans who normally don't care. Legislating creationism however won't even win you an majority in Kansas. In a general election, Jindal's legislative support of creationism would be a weight around his neck.

Posted by: theamazingjex | December 1, 2008 4:29 AM | Report abuse

"A creationist might win the GOP nomination but it will be a cold day in hell when they win the white house."

Was McCain a creationist? Didn't pretty much all the Republican primary candidates say they didn't believe in evolution?

Posted by: DDAWD | December 1, 2008 2:45 AM | Report abuse

So busy chewing out 37th I forgot to mention the other thing.

Jindal seems like a really strong candidate but come on, a creationist? I REALLY don't think this country is capable of voting in a creationist. For one thing creationism and social conservatism guarentees that most of the liberal base would stay liberal come hell or high water and for another thing creationism makes and amazing sound bite and fundraiser. Rovian tactics would look like childs play compared to the utter crapstorm that intellectuals, the media and the democratic machine would kick up at the thought of a creationist running this country. A creationist might win the GOP nomination but it will be a cold day in hell when they win the white house.

Posted by: theamazingjex | December 1, 2008 2:33 AM | Report abuse

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rg5GWI7UKtQ

Jindal on Leno.

Watch this and tell me that he is another Palin. Just because he is evangelical doesn't make him like Palin. You know how Palin had to go to live five low tier schools to get a journalism degree? Well, Jindal also went to multiple schools. Brown University for undergrad, and Oxford University for his Rhodes Scholarship. Also, he turned down Harvard med and Yale law.

Again, yes, he does have fundamentalist positions. Against abortion in all cases, against stem cell research, supports Creationism teaching in schools. All of these are bothersome positions, but if you want a theme to Jindal's short tenure, I wouldn't be looking to those issues.

Don't get me wrong. This is not a guy who I would want as President, but don't compare him to Palin. Their similarities are very shallow.

Posted by: DDAWD | December 1, 2008 12:39 AM | Report abuse

This is how bad it has gotten for the religious right and their Grand Ol' Party...even I now feel sorry for them.

So sorry, in fact, that I have put together a Christmas shopping list for the evangelical GOPer on your gift list.

It begins with a statue of Jesus at bat, playing baseball (yes, it exists Virginia), and closes with Cheeses of Nazareth.

Enjoy:
http://scootmandubious.blogspot.com/2008/11/turn-zealots-frown-upside-down-for.html

Posted by: scootmandubious | November 30, 2008 11:21 PM | Report abuse

Humm. Palin and Jindal being the future of the GOP?? I can live with that. They're harmless enough. Until the GOP and the ah hem 'social conservatives' (Evangelical's) drop the litmus tests, they're really no threat on the national level. Hillary could take either one in a national election I think.

There really isn't a policy difference between the two (Palin and Jindal). Jindal will appeal to Latino's and African-American's and other 'non-whites' as much as Palin appealed to women.

Posted by: DonJasper | November 30, 2008 8:36 PM | Report abuse

Nope. Not going to happen. The fact that we are even talking about this now--before Obama has become president--means that Jindal is peaking too early. Being the frontrunner is more curse than blessing and if he is seen as the Chosen One already, he will face tougher scrutiny earlier than Obama.

Besides, you cannot just say he's the GOP "answer" to Obama. You cannot manufacture it. Obama's situation was unique; you cannot just say, oh, let's find a guy to do that. Fighting the last battle--that's how you lose.

Posted by: Mitch22 | November 30, 2008 6:06 PM | Report abuse

I think whether Jindal runs in 2012 or not will depend upon the position of Obama's approval ratings and popularity in the fall of 2011. If it looks as though the Republican nominee will be merely a sacrificial lamb against an incumbent President who appears likely to be reelected, I would expect Jindal to wait until 2016. A sound defeat for whoever the Republican nominee is in 2012 would doom that person from future consideration. I think Jindal is likely to be the Republican nominee in 2016.

Posted by: OHIOCITIZEN | November 30, 2008 6:01 PM | Report abuse

No, CC, not all of us are salivating at the thought of the 2012 elections. Didn't you get the message that this year's campaigning went on for too long a period of time? Some of us are more concerned at the moment about the multiple problems facing our nation and how the incoming Obama administration and the Democratic-led Congress are going to help us set our country on its feet again. Politics involved elections, but it involves so much more. Let's focus on governance for while before we start the rumor mills for 2012 election.

Posted by: marmac5 | November 30, 2008 5:02 PM | Report abuse

lots and lots of Jack Kemp's out there, not to mention the guy the repugs got to run against Obama in his Senate election. Speculation from the checker players we call it.

Posted by: angriestdogintheworld | November 30, 2008 4:37 PM | Report abuse

Jindal=yawn. Maybe it's just me, but is this the GOP's "me too" moment--as in "We also have an ethnic guy!" Please.

Besides, he clearly wants to be an Exorcist, not president: http://tpmelectioncentral.talkingpointsmemo.com/2008/06/bobby_jindals_dance_with_the_d.php

Posted by: soonerthought | November 30, 2008 4:02 PM | Report abuse

Actually, Obama could have gotten a boost at Harvard from being from Hawaii. That's because the East Coast schools try to snag a few candidates from the Western states or else the whole student body would be from New England and Long Island.

Posted by: jabailo | November 30, 2008 3:53 PM | Report abuse

"Dear Fix,

Thank you for inserting a quarantine of white space around the posts of one of your persistent posters. This serves three worthy purposes: 1) that the readers of the Fix may see that there is more meaning in those white spaces than the words they entomb, 2) that it is a great courtesy to the adjacent posters who might very well be justified in complaining were their thoughts too closely proximate to this other, and 3) that the white space is a flag to your regular readers that signifies, "Move along, nothing to see here." So, once again thank you for such an innovative means of protecting your loyal readers.

Posted by: optimyst | November 30, 2008 1:50 PM"

Doesn't seem that the quarantine worked. I just finished looking at about eight quadruple (or more)-spaced "37andO" bile-filled specials. Let's try troll spray, too. Here we go: Psssssssssssssst.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | November 30, 2008 3:35 PM | Report abuse

It is very gratifying to see that the color and race barriers are coming down and that a man of color can reach the highest elective office in Louisiana.

Jindal's accomplishments and success in politics are something we can all view with pride.

It would be a shame to force Governor Jindal into a mold, i.e., the GOP version of Barack Obama and to force his development into an artificially constrained time horizon.

Governor Jindal will probably need some time to learn his new role and to develop into a superior State Chief Executive.

It is bad for politics and bad for our recruitment of national leaders not to give the Governor the time he needs to develop and to decide his next moves.

Posted by: pach12 | November 30, 2008 3:20 PM | Report abuse

"I DID MISS the ELECTION time.


All ANTI OBAMA people like:

"ASPERGIRL,KMICHAEL,ANONYMOUS,KING OF ZOUK and so on................................


NETHERLANDS ANTILLES

Posted by: fu_buki | November 30, 2008 1:00 PM"

Welcome back. Update: The posters you mention have been replaced by a troll who now calls itself "37thandO," the latest of his series of five troll handles.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | November 30, 2008 3:09 PM | Report abuse

37thO street--
you say the numbers of whites being passed over "to reach the bottom of the barrel" would shock us...

Add the names John McCain who owes his graduation from Annapolis to his parentage, and Sarah Palin who meets an affirmative action target.

Both Palin and McCain are people whose natural gifts are not commensurate to the high positions they could not have achieved without that extra boost provided by the watchful intervention of the good old boys.

Posted by: pach12 | November 30, 2008 3:06 PM | Report abuse

I think the unhinged bigoted blatherings of "37 and O" and his ilk (who are euphemistically referred to in the media as the hardcore "Republican base") indicate why Piyush Jindal has NO chance of being the presidential or vp pick in 2012, 2016, or ever.

Remember this is the same "base" that loyally showed up at Phalin hate rallies and seemed to always end up beating the snot out of the black guy who set up the stage...allegedly. Let's be honest, had Piyush been unfortunate enough to attend a Phalin rally he, too, would have been sent to the emergency room, for sure.

Phalin supposedly represents the values and culture of "the base." Well, Charley James, in his important investigative columns for laprogressive.com, reported in detail on just what those Phalin "values" are (See S--bo gate). Ugly stuff. James's interview of noted AA musician Gregory Charles Royal about his infamous encounter with Phalin "at [a] fast food joint near the [Alaska] airport" was especially upsetting.
Those are the facts.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | November 30, 2008 3:04 PM | Report abuse

Indian Catholicism's success in converting & economically uplifting Dalits (untouchables) in India'& thus ended poverty in india

This claim is utterly ridiculous. Rural poverty has not been ended in India.

Why is the heavily Catholic Mezzo-Giorno still impoverished? In the same vein why is it that the resource rich and heavily Catholic Republics of Latin America still mired in poverty?

Catholicism neither causes nor cures poverty. It is ridiculous to make any claims otherwise.

Posted by: pach12 | November 30, 2008 2:59 PM | Report abuse

"The news just keeps getting better and better for the Democrats. Bobby Jindal may be a fresh face, in the same sense Sarah Palin was, but he is an extreme right-wing reactionary"

No, he actually isn't. He espouses the typical right wing views, but that hasn't really been the centerpiece of his agenda.

Of course, Palin was like that until he hit the national stage. She became reactionary only after becoming the VP candidate.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 30, 2008 2:34 PM | Report abuse

hm - let's see how obama piyushji actually is-
(1)bobby jindalji gets mocked for anglicising name and 'finding jesus' to suckup to christians ala asian fob's whereas barack 'skinny-kid-with-a-funny-name' obama is admired for running for president with his muslim middle-name intact. this is unfair - barack could be barry to friends, what could piyush be other than 'pee'?!

(2)many hindu-leaning americans wont warm up to jindalji -maybe bcos, as someone elsesaid ' Indian Catholicism's success in converting & economically uplifting Dalits (untouchables) in India'& thus ended poverty in india, or maybe b'cos hindus in general aren't very fond of zealots like jindal or even the sainted pope john paul ii who landed in india as a state-guest of rightwing hindu nationalist bjp and said he was there for 'reaping a harvest of souls' and on diwali spoke of delivering 'hindus from their darkness' - or maybe, just maybe american-hindus, like many other americans, are just plain-old scared of jindal for his retarded views on evolution, education and immigration just like theyare scared of nutcases like alan keyes or neo-nazis like tom tancredo...

Posted by: sambar | November 30, 2008 2:26 PM | Report abuse

I can imagine the Fox News reports now. "I hear Jindal is a Muslim and wasn't born in America. He's going to tax the whites and give handouts to his Indian-American buddies and make Ghandi Day a national holiday. He's too inexperienced and pals around with terrorists. Oh, he's a republican? Whoops!"

Posted by: thecorinthian | November 30, 2008 2:09 PM | Report abuse

Yea! Jindal/Palin 2012- they can have a caveman riding a dinosaur as the new party symbol. Creationism- they both believe it- so I think Jindal isn't really too bright.

Posted by: AndrearKline | November 30, 2008 1:55 PM | Report abuse

Dear Fix,

Thank you for inserting a quarantine of white space around the posts of one of your persistent posters. This serves three worthy purposes: 1) that the readers of the Fix may see that there is more meaning in those white spaces than the words they entomb, 2) that it is a great courtesy to the adjacent posters who might very well be justified in complaining were their thoughts too closely proximate to this other, and 3) that the white space is a flag to your regular readers that signifies, "Move along, nothing to see here." So, once again thank you for such an innovative means of protecting your loyal readers.

Posted by: optimyst | November 30, 2008 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Watch the right-wing squirm when we start using his real name-Piyush. Piyush Jindal has no standing out here in the West, and certainly has no charisma other than with the old missionary crowd down South-ie. white zealots.
In India, he is referred to as the "gori" candidate-i.e. read gringo.

Posted by: Shaun-kar | November 30, 2008 1:37 PM | Report abuse

Anyone who blathers about affirmative action where Obama is concerned is just regurgitating Hannity's crap. Obama did not even report his ethnicity on his application to Harvard, so he got in TOTALLY on his merit. Bush would never have gotten into Yale except that he was a "legacy" (AKA "affirmative action for rich doners"). McCain would never have gotten into Annapolis if his father and grandfather hadn't been Annapolis grads who had reached flag rank.

I guess competence joins with science and the rest of the reality-based wold in having a Liberal bias.

Posted by: bizecology | November 30, 2008 1:26 PM | Report abuse

37thO street--
you say the numbers of whites being passed over "to reach the bottom of the barrel" would shock us...

Well, would you like to clue us in since you are so "in the know"? Tell us the numbers.

Would they include G.W. Bush, who certainly did not have the grades to get into Yale or Harvard Business School, but got in anyways? How many white people were passed over so he could "take their place"?

And did you know Obama finished in the top 10% of his class at Harvard Law?

So I'm guessing you believe Bush was qualified to be president, but Obama was only elected because of the color of his skin? Wow!

I'll be waiting for those numbers.

Posted by: ussamsarmy | November 30, 2008 1:14 PM | Report abuse

The news just keeps getting better and better for the Democrats. Bobby Jindal may be a fresh face, in the same sense Sarah Palin was, but he is an extreme right-wing reactionary, who will tend to further shrink Republican party ranks. Louisiana is not the crucible needed to forge a national leader.

Posted by: lowercaselarry | November 30, 2008 1:00 PM | Report abuse

I DID MISS the ELECTION time.


All ANTI OBAMA people like:

ASPERGIRL,KMICHAEL,ANONYMOUS,KING OF ZOUK and so on................................


NETHERLANDS ANTILLES

Posted by: fu_buki | November 30, 2008 1:00 PM | Report abuse

Hi! well come back

NETHERLANDS ANTILES

Posted by: fu_buki | November 30, 2008 12:57 PM | Report abuse

When the background information about Jindal and some of his questionable activities (exorcism, anyone?), religious fanaticism, and his strong support of corporations over workers, it will be apparent that he's just a young, smiling, retread of the same old crap we've long received from the GOP.

He's Sarah Palin with a better education. Same of ideological crap. The only reason he got elected governor of Louisiana was that the GOP successfully performed ethnic cleansing in New Orleans to remove enough democratic voters to change the overall balance of power in the state.

Posted by: bizecology | November 30, 2008 12:57 PM | Report abuse

I think it is great that there is an accomplished, educated man worth of the
GOP nomination. I hope the party does
their homework and truly looks for a candidate with depth and intelligence.
Sarah Palin is a mile wide and an inch deep. I would hope that she fades out and let the bright stars shine through.
She truly unnerves me and I feel intuitively that she lies all the time.
She gets away with it in Alaska i guess.
I hope that she stays there.

Posted by: karenrn1 | November 30, 2008 12:52 PM | Report abuse

37th , your two posts today are just racist. Get it through your head that a person's ethnic background has NOTHING WHATSOEVER TO DO with his/her intellectual ability, and that to imply otherwise marks you as someone insecure about your own.

Posted by: bokonon13 | November 30, 2008 12:40 PM | Report abuse

As a die hard Obama supporter, I would respect Jindal as a worthy opponent. As an American, I deplore Sarah Palin.

Posted by: NMP1 | November 30, 2008 12:19 PM | Report abuse

You said it well and well lucy2008.

Posted by: san9753 | November 30, 2008 12:15 PM | Report abuse

Chris,

One thing Jindal may have trouble with is the Indian-American vote, which breaks about 60-20 democratic--at least since "macaca." Further, he is Catholic, which many Hindu-leaning Indian-Americans don't like because of Indian Catholicism's success in converting & economically uplifting Dalits (untouchables) in India.

Posted by: sturun | November 30, 2008 12:14 PM | Report abuse

The Jindal buzz seems to suggest that at least some Republicans have concluded that Obama was the better candidate in 2008. Jindal is indeed a young, intellectual, ethnic candidate, but makes him not only the Republican version of Obama, but also the anti-Palin.

Posted by: miramar1954 | November 30, 2008 11:54 AM | Report abuse

Michael Leahy's original Washington Post article about Bobby Jindel is Republican propaganda pure and simple. However, there is good substance to his opinions. The Republican party does need a reset and new and young Republican politicians are critical to this reset and new direction. If Leahy is promoting Bobby Jindal, this shows how desperate they are. The Republicans are desperate for an Obama-like figure. Today, Bobby Jindal is no Obama. He is young, talented, and a competent governor. He speaks from a well-educated background and as one who looks forward to solving issues of the 21st century. This is a very good thing for the Republican party. He is well spoken and highly ambitious. All of these are good things. However, Jindal, today is not a leader and is not inspiring in a unifying way. He is not one to bring together many groups of people of differing culture, race, and belief. He is a man of Louisiana, a man of the south- even though his family is from India. Furthermore, Jindal is highly devisive by not only representing extremely narrow socially conservative views but also extreme actions. In the end, the Republicans need to determine what they are other than wanting to be Reaganites again or Fundamentalist evangelicals or Neoconservatives. What are they and what do they believe? Today they are too homogeneous and filled with "Anti" people who are anti "liberal", anti intellectuals and education, anti other races, anti other religions and beliefs, and anti other cultures including the youth. The list goes on and on. They need to decide what they are for in a positive way and one that inspires. They need to put fear-mongering and hate-mongering aside. They need to get Rush Limbaugh moved out of their core center. Rush is the greatest fan of Jindal and he loved and promoted Palin long before her fame. Fat chance on any of this. Fat chance that the Republicans will truely go through a process of intellectual honesty. It is sad. We all need a healthy Republican party to make our democracy more healthy.

Posted by: lucy2008 | November 30, 2008 11:48 AM | Report abuse

"Not to be Negative Nancy realist, but the racist vote in the Appalachian region won't show up in a race between Obama and Jindal, they would be more likely to back a third party candidate."

Well, Jindal is in Louisiana. It's not like he squeaked by or won because of a split vote. He stomped the competition. I'm not so sure that he can't win over Appalachia.

I do think his age might work against him in the primaries. Unlike Democrats, Republicans seem to like older candidates. Democrats have Kennedy, Clinton and Obama. Republicans have Reagan, Bush, Dole, McCain. Given that the current president is by far the youngest Republican nominee in my lifetime at 54, Jindal might be too young for the taste of Republican primary voters.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 30, 2008 11:43 AM | Report abuse

.

.

.

.


mark_in_austin


I believe you really do not know what is going on over the past two decades in colleges, graduate admissions and in major corporations in America -


sorry.

However there are affirmative action programs all over the place - qualified whites are pushed aside daily so that less qualified people can fill quotas established by some human relations department.

I seriously do not know what you are talking about.

The whole thing with Obama - people were not voting for him because they thought he was the "Most Qualified Candidate" - they were voting for him because the deciding factor in their minds was to "Make some affirmative action statement" or "Wouldn't it be wonderful if we proved to the world we weren't racist"


All I can say is those are pretty close to being racist consideration.

If one votes for a candidate because of their skin color - that you want to vote for a black over a white - that vote cast is racist.


Sorry, but true.


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Posted by: 37thOStreetRules | November 30, 2008 11:35 AM | Report abuse

Um, could we let Obama govern and fix the mess we're in b4 starting the 2012 derby? This is stupid, Chris. I love politics, too, to be an obsessive speculator before Obama's even inaugurated is irresponsible. No one knows what will happen next year, let alone in three. Stop the insanity. Please. For the good of the country. Focus on governors or senators in 2010 more than 2012.

Posted by: vancouver1999 | November 30, 2008 11:06 AM | Report abuse

StreetCorner, do you assume that BHO and Jindal have no substance? Both have said they oppose affirmative action based on skin color.

Affirmative action by skin color in federal hiring and federal funding [read: university research grants] is a product of a Nixon EO that was designed to break the seniority based power of unions, in a reaction to events in Phila, as I recall.

It is past time for affirmative action in education to be based on relative poverty and not on skin color. Poor kids who merit aid should get it, for the benefit of the nation as a whole. BHO agrees. Does Jindal?

LA is a tough crucible. If Jindal succeeds there it will make him a formidable voice in the R Party for decades to come. I wish him well, but I also would like to see that he really is not a religious fundie who demands a breach in the wall of separation between church and state.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | November 30, 2008 11:03 AM | Report abuse

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This entire issue is getting silly - it is the 60s generation which is obsessed with race - anyone younger than 58 has been raised in a society in which race relations were much better and they see race relations as far less of an issue.


It is like the Hillary factor - sexism this year really was not much of a motivating factor.


PEOPLE ARE SICK OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION - PEOPLE ARE SICK OF UNQUALIFIED PEOPLE HOLDING JOBS.


It is that simple.


Americans want a MERIT-BASED SOCIETY.


Affirmative Action really was never ever voted in.


Affirmative Action advocates pushed their agenda in through the side door - through pressuring college admissions boards - through threatening corporations - no one ever really wanted it to begin with.


One point to remember: Colleges still REFUSE to publish numbers on the disparity between races in college and graduate admissions - there is a wide gap


AND colleges REFUSE to publish the number of whites PASSED OVER TO REACH THE BOTTOM OF THE BARREL -

These numbers would shock you.

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Posted by: 37thOStreetRules | November 30, 2008 10:33 AM | Report abuse

Not to be Negative Nancy realist, but the racist vote in the Appalachian region won't show up in a race between Obama and Jindal, they would be more likely to back a third party candidate.

I think Jindal is an able Politician he has moved through the rankings very fast, but we should see if he is going to run Louisiana in the ground or not, a lot can happen over the next four years (ala Hurricane).

Posted by: sjxylib | November 30, 2008 10:23 AM | Report abuse

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