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Va. Senate: Rep. Davis is Out (Redux)

Virginia Republican Rep. Tom Davis this morning officially removed himself from the open-seat race to replace retiring Sen. John Warner (R), clearing the way for former Gov. Jim Gilmore to be the Republican standard-bearer.

"This is just probably not the right time for me to make any advance and run for the Senate," Davis told reporters at a Christian Science Monitor-sponsored breakfast this morning in Washington. Read the story about Davis's comments, written by The Post's Amy Gardner.

After the news of his decision was first reported in The Fix on Monday night, Davis inexplicably denied that he had made up his mind and, in fact, said he would make no decision until after the November elections in Virginia, where his wife -- state Sen. Jeannemarie Devolites Davis (R) -- faces a very serious reelection challenge.

Less than 48 hours later, Davis was openly declaring that he is out of the race.

It's not immediately clear whether Davis will run for reelection to his 11th District seat, a swing district where Democrats would be favored if the incumbent opted against a reelection bid. Fairfax County Board of Supervisors Chairman Gerry Connolly (D) would likely run for the seat and start as a favorite.

What we do know is that with Davis out of the Senate race, Gilmore becomes the strong favorite for the nomination. While either Davis or Gilmore would have started the general election as an underdog to uber-popular former Gov. Mark Warner, Republicans chances to hold the seat grow even more faint with Davis' decision.

Davis's base in northern Virginia -- by far the fastest growing area in the state -- plus his fundraising abilities and his moderate profile made him a potentially viable challenger to Warner. Gilmore, who served as the Commonwealth's governor from 1997-2001 and made a brief, quixotic presidential bid this year has a far more limited fundraising base and carries a more conservative profile than Davis.

In the last Friday Senate Line, the Virginia race was ranked No. 1 -- the seat most likely to change party control in 2008. With Davis's decision, it may have won itself a permanent hold on that slot.

By Chris Cillizza  |  October 25, 2007; 11:16 AM ET
Categories:  Senate  
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Comments

kevinschmidt,
I believe that Davis did listen to his constituents as well as common sense, changed his position and was on board with the underground version of the Metro through Tyson's. Tim Kaine, on the otherhand, was the one that studied the over/under for months and decided on over. "We have to make a call, and the call has to be made with a goal in mind. And the goal is this: This is an airport that should have been served by rail when it was built. To come back later now to do it -- I wish we didn't have to. But by gosh, we need to if we're going to have a quality of life that is worthwhile in this region." You can blame Democratic Governor Tim Kaine for the mess that will be Tyson's.

Posted by: dave | October 26, 2007 8:53 PM | Report abuse

Davis had to drop out because he is no longer popular, or wanted in Northern Virginia. He won't even win back his district in the House!

He preformed miserably, at least for his constituents, when he helped the war profiteer Bechtel to bully NOVA into accepting the wildly unpopular, traffic creating, business bankrupting, sight blighting, above ground noise making Metro through down town Tyson's Corner.

Davis jumped over the cliff for that lobbyist inspired mutiny against WE THE PEOPLE. Look for another Democrat to take over another seat in the House of Representatives, again.

Posted by: kevinschmidt | October 26, 2007 5:47 PM | Report abuse

Unless "lightning strikes," Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) will be sworn in on Jan. 2009.

Posted by: Lloth8 | October 26, 2007 12:27 AM | Report abuse

The big story here isn't the Senate but the House. What Davis decides will very likely determine who holds his seat in 2008. Right now, with Davis on the fence, Campaign Diaries rates it as a toss-up ( http://www.campaigndiaries.com/houserankings ). But VA-11 is very likely to jump up to Lean Takeover is Davis retires.

Posted by: campaigndiaries | October 25, 2007 10:50 PM | Report abuse

JasonL_in_MD,
I suggest you read the following - it tells you some of the, uh, rest of the story.
http://www.nationalreview.com/nrof_comment/ferrara200602030900.asp

Posted by: dave | October 25, 2007 8:59 PM | Report abuse

Toss this Bush enabler out with the rest of the Republican garbage.

Posted by: smokinmike | October 25, 2007 8:28 PM | Report abuse

ccat, Would not your numbers suggest Davis was more moderate than Moran?

I am assuming that a score of "50" would place one as "perfectly moderate" on either a conservative or liberal scale that measured 1-100.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 25, 2007 7:26 PM | Report abuse

JD wrote:
" ccatmoon asks,

"Where does Davis get his "moderate" reputation?

How often has he not marched in lockstep with BushCo?"

The answer is, because he IS a moderate. He routinely sides with DC and Maryland on issues addressing us locals.

I'm not sure what litmus test you're using to cast aspersions, but all Tom's recent votes are here:

http://www.vote-smart.org/voting_category.php?can_id=21935

Note the votes on S-CHIP, probably the most recent barometer.

JD"

Tom Davis has got an ACU rating of 71.1. In comparison, Jim Moran's rating is 15.5.

You do the math.

Posted by: ccatmoon | October 25, 2007 7:19 PM | Report abuse

"Here's a link to a Post story, when the final budget numbers were released, a month after the tax increase passed, but before any new revenues flowed to Richmond" -GRILLADES

It seems to me that the story actually is that they ahd higher than expected economic growth and receipts from sales taxes were higher than expected. At the very most, you can call that slight incompetence in the finance department. Very likely, it's more a case of being conservative about certain assumptions made when projecting revenue into the median term. I think it's entirely disingenuous to say that anyone lied or deliberately deceived Virginians.

Besides, they probably will need that money in the near future as the dollar continues to weaken.
----
Jackson, I think that a 5 point scale doesn't quite reflect Virginia. I think if we used a scale of ten we'd find Virginia around 7.5 in 2000 and trending more towards 6.5 in 2006. Depending on the rate of continued population growth on NoVa, it could move lower down the scale to a 5 or 6 in the next decade.

Of course, BRAC might throw a lot of these numbers off depending on how things settle out.

Posted by: JasonL_in_MD | October 25, 2007 5:03 PM | Report abuse

novamatt, thanks for the cite. bryant_flier, were you "reason"?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 25, 2007 3:33 PM | Report abuse

Dave, I agree that the Ehrlich win was flukey, but it also fit a pattern of deep-blue Northeastern states electing center-right Republican governors, perhaps to act as a brake on overwhelmingly D state legislatures. (And that's sort of mirrored by D governors in deep-red states like Kansas and Wyoming and Oklahoma.)

And, interestingly, the kinds of voters that Ehrlich won over in places like Baltimore County and Frederick and Anne Arundel are exactly the kinds of voters who have been abandoning the RPV in recent elections. Kaine did better in the Richmond and Hampton Roads suburbs than Mark Warner had four years earlier. Webb won because he creamed Allen in NoVa precincts that had previously been purplish or light red. It's not particularly deep or earth-shattering to point out that middle-class suburban white folks have replaced working-class Reagan Democrats as the new swing voters, but the Republicans seemingly haven't figured that out yet.

Posted by: novamatt | October 25, 2007 3:32 PM | Report abuse

JasonL:

Here's a link to a Post story, when the final budget numbers were released, a month after the tax increase passed, but before any new revenues flowed to Richmond:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7614-2004Jul22.html

Word of the surplus had leaked out ahead of time - but I couldn't find a Post archive on it.

Posted by: GRILLADES | October 25, 2007 3:17 PM | Report abuse

Now will Davis head to K-street or run for re-election to his house seat? On one hand, he will likely be the favorite in 2012 for the R nomination vs. Webb for that senate seat if he hangs on in congress. Not to mention a high paying gig on K-street could hurt that effort. On the other hand, serving as a minority party in congress for a few more years could be a lonely place. K-street could be more rewarding financially than a house seat, especially one in the minority party. Other options for Davis could include dropping out of the House and making a run for governor in 2009. Or, he could run for re-election and after being elected run for the governor's mansion in 2009. Davis would certainly have more fun in the governor's mansion than he would in the minority of congress. However, Lt. govornor Bolling and St. Atty. general McCollum is looking at the governor's race there. So, to win the R nomination there, Davis would likely have to contend in a very tough primary. He now must choose his next move.

In terms of the race, Mark Warner is certainly the overwhelming favorite. After Gilmore's struggling Presidential run, he will now try another up-hill battle. He has a much better shot at this than at the Presidential nomination, however. At least he is now the front runner for the R nomination. However, this could have something to do with the fact that he has no other announced competition.

Posted by: bryant_flier2006 | October 25, 2007 2:42 PM | Report abuse

I'm sorry this is long, but I found it so terrifying I though some of you might want to know:

'Check out what nattering nabob of neoconservativism Norman Podhoretz, a top foreign policy adviser to Rudy, has just confided to The New York Observer about a recent private conversation he had with the candidate:

Norman Podhoretz believes that America needs to go to war soon with Iran. As far as he knows, Rudy Giuliani thinks the same thing.

"I was asked to come in and give him a briefing on the war, World War IV," said Mr. Podhoretz, a founding father of neoconservatism and leading foreign policy adviser to Mr. Giuliani. "As far as I can tell there is very little difference in how he sees the war and how I see it."

So unless I missed something here, Podhoretz explicitly says that he "was asked" to brief Rudy on "World War IV," and that Rudy is with him on this and is even preparing for this fourth global showdown against Iran and the rest of the 'Islamofascists.'

You know, maybe someone should ask Rudy's campaign about this.

At the end of the Observer interview with Podhoretz comes the following about his views:

'America should be working to overthrow governments in Saudi Arabia, Syria and Egypt and "every one of the despotic regimes in that region, by force if necessary," he said. "They are fronts of the war.. And to have toppled two of those regimes in five years or six years is I think a major achievement. And maybe George Bush won't be able to carry it further, but I think he will. It may have just been given to him to start act one of the five-act play."

A play which I expect will end like one of Shakespeare's grittier --with everyone in the cast dead on the floor.

Posted by: drindl | October 25, 2007 2:30 PM | Report abuse

Definitely #1. (Northern) Yankees are changing the complextion of Northern Virginia, which is a good thing for Dems. As you mentioned, Gilmore represents the "Old Virginia" more than Davis does. Warner is a pro-business centrist who on paper should easily defeat the Gilmore Girl.

Posted by: con_crusher | October 25, 2007 2:27 PM | Report abuse

novamatt,
Ehrlich getting elected in MD in the first place was a fluke. It was more the result of an incredibly poor Dem candidate (Kathleen Kennedy Townsend) and what seemed like an eternity of Paris Glendening (who easily had worn out his welcome). Maryland is not a fertile ground for Republicans and his loss, despite being moderate, was expected.

Posted by: dave | October 25, 2007 2:27 PM | Report abuse

' Is the near term future of the national R Party more likely to be assured by its Main Street, pro-military voices, or its Wall Street internationalist voice, or its neo-con voice, or its social and religious conservative voice'

I think that will depend to a certain extent on who's president. The candidate running as the heir apparent to the neocon agenda is rudy. I just read an article in the WSJ this morning about his advisors--the scariest bunch of loony warmongers you could imagine --Podhoretz, Ledeen, Pipes, Bolton -- if you'r familiar with these folks you understand that they're some of the most dangerous people on earth, the most likely to get us into a nuclear 'shooting match' [where we might 'get our hair a little mussed'] if you recall Dr. Strangelove.

Mitty on theother hand, is the hair apparent to Wall Street...Huckabee to the christian conservatives [if they actually were]-- and as far as Main Street , I guess Fred is trying for that, but it's a real stretch. And ron Paul appeals to the militia guys who liive in homemade barracks, wear camoflauge all the time and like to play paintball.

The rest of them I can't even remember.

Posted by: drindl | October 25, 2007 2:11 PM | Report abuse

Mark in Austin,

>>1. Is the near term future success of the NoVa R Party dependent on moderate Rs?

NoVa is more Northeast than South, and Republicans here are under the same pressure that Republicans are under all over the bluish and purplish states. The same rejection of wedge politics that turned out Nancy Johnson and Charlie Bass and Bob Ehrlich is what's pushing Tom Davis (and Ken Cuccinelli and Jay O'Brien, for those following the General Assembly races).

2. In VA as a whole, would moderate or social conservative Rs dominate and is there room for both?

The moderate/conservative split here seems to be as much geography and culture as it is ideology. The Marc Fisher post about "Virginia values" from a week or so ago is instructive: http://blog.washingtonpost.com/rawfisher/2007/10/the_long_corrosive_impact_of_v.html

3. Is the near term future of the national R Party more likely to be assured by its Main Street, pro-military voices, or its Wall Street internationalist voice, or its neo-con voice, or its social and religious conservative voice? As uncomfortable as my R friends are with the latter two elements, I suspect that the Main Street and Wall Street elements have a good understanding on their restrictive views of unions that bind them even in the face of Main Street being cool to globalization. As an Independent, I have a stake in the more moderate Rs being heard, but what do Rs who post here think?

That's going to be something the R's will have to figure out. Like you, I want to see a sane, thoughtful Republican Party that has returned to its civic republican roots. And that might well be what emerges after what I'm guessing will be their upcoming stroll through the political wilderness. But I don't think the theos or the neos will just let that happen without a long, arduous intraparty fight. For those of us on the outside looking in, it's definitely Bring Your Own Popcorn, because it's going to be hella entertaining.

Posted by: novamatt | October 25, 2007 1:43 PM | Report abuse

hisroc,
It was TMOPIA that kept the car tax from completely disappearing. He campaigned that he would fulfill the plan for the final axing of the tax and then, once elected, went back on the campaign promise. Later in his term, he had the gall to pass the largest tax increase in the history of Virginia and still not kill the car tax. If you live in VA and you pay a car tax, the only person you have to thank for that is TMOPIA.

Posted by: dave | October 25, 2007 1:37 PM | Report abuse

CC is correct in that Davis leaving the race virtually assures that The Most Overrated Politician In America (TMOPIA) will become the next Senator from the Old Dominion, barring some sort of Macaca incident. Gilmore just will not have the pull necessary in NoVa to even be competitive.

Gerry Connolly is a well meaning individual and has done some good things as supervisor. That said, he lacks any sort of vision required for a seat in Congress. Two of the biggest issues in the NoVa area are traffic and illegal immigration. The DC area has one of the worst traffic problems in the US. Connolly has an 8 (EIGHT!) point transportation plan that does not call for building more roads or rail! He has a lot of good ideas (telework, flextime, congestion reduction strategies, etc.), but you would think that with 8 points, adding more commuter capacity would find a prominent place in there.

As far as illegal immigration, Connolly has said that under no circumstances would he follow the lead of Prince William County and push for legislation to cut off services to illegal immigrants or authorize police to check the immigration status of suspects.

Posted by: dave | October 25, 2007 1:26 PM | Report abuse

BSimon,

The question of whether Davis will run again for his seat in the House was left open by none other than Davis himself. After saying that he wouldn't be running for Senate, he was asked yesterday if he'd be running for reelection to Congress. His response was that he hadn't decided yet. Hence it could go either way and thus the question of who could win that seat becomes a fun and interesting one.

JasonL,

To get more specific about what you are saying, consider a 5 point political scale measuring the mainstream range of American politics with '1' being the most liberal and '5' being the most conservative. Say that someone like Ted Kennedy or Barbara Boxer would be a '1' and someone like Rick Santorum or Jerry Kilgore would be a '5.'

Virginia, over all, is about a 4. A bit on the conservative side. Virginia Democrats have figured this out and started running candidates that are usually a 3 and sometimes a 4. Wheras Virginia Republicans keep nominating candidates that are a '5.'

While Virginia voters are indeed closer to what are traditionally Republican politics in a national sense, the Virginia Dems have successfully positioned themselves politically closer to a majority of voters than the Virginia Republicans.

When the VA GOP finally gets this fact through their thick skulls, they will start nominating people who rate a 4 and then they will start winning elections again.

Posted by: JacksonLanders | October 25, 2007 1:21 PM | Report abuse

GRILLADES, I don't remember that from the VA budget debate. Can you cite a reference?

Posted by: JasonL_in_MD | October 25, 2007 12:59 PM | Report abuse

"1. Is the near term future success of the NoVa R Party dependent on moderate Rs?"
Without a doubt if they have any future at all it will be with moderates. JD can correct me on this if I'm wrong but I think here are still sufficient conservative leanings that a Republican that was a fiscal conservative but social liberal might thrive or survive.
----
"2. In VA as a whole, would moderate or social conservative Rs dominate and is there room for both?"
Southern VA is still pretty conservative. I imagine that the House delegation will remain pretty divided but the high population of NoVa will push statewide elections blue or purple in the near term and possibly the long term.
----
"3. Is the near term future of the national R Party more likely to be assured by its Main Street, pro-military voices, or its Wall Street internationalist voice, or its neo-con voice, or its social and religious conservative voice? As uncomfortable as my R friends are with the latter two elements, I suspect that the Main Street and Wall Street elements have a good understanding on their restrictive views of unions that bind them even in the face of Main Street being cool to globalization. As an Independent, I have a stake in the more moderate Rs being heard, but what do Rs who post here think?"
Not being a Republican you can take my words with a grain of salt, but as a moderate Dem with many Republican friends (and my wife, too) and education and professional experience in politics, I feel like the Main and Wall Street variants will hold the future of Republican politics. Maybe it's just because I live in Maryland but I see a lot of Republicans who are socially moderate, liberal, or libertarian. The Christian Conservatives are a minority, albeit a vocal, active one. Americans, I think, will care less and less about your sexual preference but fiscal discipline and a strong military are enduring issues.

Posted by: JasonL_in_MD | October 25, 2007 12:58 PM | Report abuse

I do have to comment on Warner "cleaning up" Gilmore's budget. Recall that Warner got through a nearly $1 billion in tax increases by claiming that the coffers were bare. Two days after the tax increases passed, Warner's own budget people admitted that the state was actually over $300 million in the black. In other words, Warner lied about the true state of Virginia's finances in order to get through the tax increases he sought.

Posted by: GRILLADES | October 25, 2007 12:54 PM | Report abuse

Warner 59-Gilmore 41.

The purpling of VA continues.

Posted by: Spectator2 | October 25, 2007 12:54 PM | Report abuse

CC,
You are much too kind to Jim Gilmore. The moderate and independent voters in Virginia who supported him over Don Beyer for Governor now despise and disparage his administration for his failure to keep his key campaign promise to abolish the car tax and for his ruinous budgets that left Virginia a financial basket case for Mark Warner to clean up. Warner will win a race against "Gimmick Gilmore" in a landslide.

Posted by: hisroc | October 25, 2007 12:42 PM | Report abuse

"Oil giant BP settles price-fixing charges
Ex-employees also expected to face federal indictment

WASHINGTON - Oil and gas giant BP PLC will pay $373 million in fines and restitution in an agreement to be announced Thursday to end an investigation into whether it manipulated energy markets in 2004, federal officials said.

Additionally, four former BP employees are expected to be indicted by a grand jury in Chicago on mail and wire fraud charges, a law enforcement official said.
"

Finally. Some accountability. We forget what that word meant in government the last 15 years. Other than accountability for a bj, we haven't known that. In 08 or 12 we get our country back. Batter sooner than later.

Posted by: RUFUS11_33 | October 25, 2007 12:29 PM | Report abuse

I think, mark, the main street people will be gone. The pro-military would also be gone, to the dems. Teh "religous" sector, already bailing on them for a third. So what does that leave the gop as? Neo-cons and Wall street. Or better yet, the corporations and the fascists. That is your party. Not an attack.Answering your question. Go fRed Thompson 08

Posted by: RUFUS11_33 | October 25, 2007 12:26 PM | Report abuse

JimSheridan, This is Chris' third Davis based web log in four days. It is likely that the topic will be exhausted soon.

I asked the posters in and near NoVa about Davis on the first post. I now ask some related questions, which could lead to a threadjack, though none is intended.

1. Is the near term future success of the NoVa R Party dependent on moderate Rs?

2. In VA as a whole, would moderate or social conservative Rs dominate and is there room for both?

3. Is the near term future of the national R Party more likely to be assured by its Main Street, pro-military voices, or its Wall Street internationalist voice, or its neo-con voice, or its social and religious conservative voice? As uncomfortable as my R friends are with the latter two elements, I suspect that the Main Street and Wall Street elements have a good understanding on their restrictive views of unions that bind them even in the face of Main Street being cool to globalization. As an Independent, I have a stake in the more moderate Rs being heard, but what do Rs who post here think?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 25, 2007 12:21 PM | Report abuse

"UPDATE: Protestor painted in 'blood' accosts Condoleezza..."

From the gop noise machine drudge. Accosts? Accosts? Did anyone see this video? Accosts. It was the protesters that were "accosted" by the police. Frickin republicans. Be carefuyl everybody. The right is inciting violence agaisnt americans. Be careful out there. Earlier in the week O'REIlly inciting violnce. He has been after columbia u, now nooses are being found on black teachers doors. He is inciting violence agaisnt the left as is rush and the right wing noise machine. Be careful out their liberals. The fascists WILL go after us. They WILL hurty americans. The left does nto do this. Even after the last 8 years, who on the right has been silenced or hurt. I can point out many on the left who have been silenced or hurt. Who on the right has been? And they still want to hurt us? Fascists.
Fascists. I'll say it agaisn. Fascists, you will never win. You have already lost. It is impossible for the fascists to win. Even if you don't hold elections, you still lose. Your party is done for a generation. Lookk in the mirror is you want to blame someone. This is america. We are a free nation. Real Patriots and christians are not scared to die for what they believe in. We do not fear you. Fear doesn't exist. Your party is done GOP.

Posted by: RUFUS11_33 | October 25, 2007 12:11 PM | Report abuse

ccatmoon asks,

"Where does Davis get his "moderate" reputation?

How often has he not marched in lockstep with BushCo?"

The answer is, because he IS a moderate. He routinely sides with DC and Maryland on issues addressing us locals.

I'm not sure what litmus test you're using to cast aspersions, but all Tom's recent votes are here:

http://www.vote-smart.org/voting_category.php?can_id=21935

Note the votes on S-CHIP, probably the most recent barometer.

JD

Posted by: JD | October 25, 2007 12:08 PM | Report abuse

"As penance, you should be even stricter, and limit yourself to 0 comments per post. Lead by example!"


:) That is a good "rule". If you got a proble, rather than moldig the rules to the fascists liking. GO ELSEWHERE, if you got a problem. Good rule.

Posted by: RUFUS11_33 | October 25, 2007 12:03 PM | Report abuse

Warner's got the seat. No one can beat him in VA. Espiecally if the gop has got no one.

Obama news

""Obama: Gore to be 'involved in our administration in a very senior capacity'... "

Yeah. Yesterday no retroactive immunity for the lawbreaking telecom. Today this. this man is on the right track.

Posted by: RUFUS11_33 | October 25, 2007 12:02 PM | Report abuse

fascists. do what you will. make any exuses you must to justify you fascism. it is the gop way. I may be forced to post all day, if it's going to be "silence the internet day."

You know I won't let the fascists win. you know I won't let you silence the internet. you can't win. It's impossible. think about your arguements for a second. Only the right has free speech? How do you justify your double think? THe gop is done. I'm not feeling to good today. Please don't play games today. Post your posts. No one is stopping you. If you are a propogandist and scared to be called on it, go elsewhere. Easy fix for the coward fascists. The cowards who like to attack children and indoctrinate the children. Not on my watch. Not while I'm still alive and kicking. You cannot silence the internet gop. You see cc, give then an ince they take a foot. CAve into the bullies once and now they think they can make all the rules on your blog. Eventually there would be no blog.

Freedom is better than slavery cc. don't become a slave to them. Give and inch they take a mile. They are fascists. Tehy will never be satisfied. Until only they can speak and the left are silenced. They will never be happy until everyone in the world are ronald reagan clones. To give in to them only emboldens them,cc. Stop caving in to the fascist bullies.

Posted by: RUFUS11_33 | October 25, 2007 12:01 PM | Report abuse

tHOUGHT POLICE.

One entry per blog? Wow. What are you scared of. I know you republcians hate freedom. CC already set the blog up for registration, for pete's sake. Let people breath. Frickin republcains these days. Your way or the highway. Why? In the marketplace of ideas, you need a monopoly to compeate. You must make imaginary rules to have the smallest of chances. It doesn't work that way. This is america. We WERE a free nation. We get our coutnry back from the fascists 08

Posted by: RUFUS11_33 | October 25, 2007 12:00 PM | Report abuse

JacksonEuler writes
"the interesting thing will be if Davis runs for his Rep. seat again or if he is part of the "republican rush" out of the Congress."

Do you have any info on whether Davis would choose to resign over running for reelection? Or is it pure speculation on your part?

Posted by: bsimon | October 25, 2007 11:59 AM | Report abuse

I've got some bad news, Jim. This is basically the same post as the previous one. Both have the same title, and the previous post links here. And I notice that you've made a comment both on the previous version of this post and the current one.

You are therefore in violation of your own rule. How can you expect others to follow your rule when you yourself do not? As penance, you should be even stricter, and limit yourself to 0 comments per post. Lead by example!

Posted by: Blarg | October 25, 2007 11:52 AM | Report abuse

Where does Davis get his "moderate" reputation?

How often has he not marched in lockstep with BushCo?

Posted by: ccatmoon | October 25, 2007 11:49 AM | Report abuse

Can we just give this to the Dems already? Now the question is whether they can become veto-proof.

http://www.political-buzz.com/

Posted by: parkerfl | October 25, 2007 11:41 AM | Report abuse

I agree with CC that the Warner Senate race is probably locked up for good, the interesting thing will be if Davis runs for his Rep. seat again or if he is part of the "republican rush" out of the Congress.
As for the comment by JimSheridan, I completely agreee that some sort of limit has to be set. The posts begin as thoughtful and brief and within an hour are taken over by writers who feel it is more important to name-call and belittle. Like most, I suspect, I stop readind the posts once the back-and-forth bickering begins.

Posted by: JacksonEuler | October 25, 2007 11:37 AM | Report abuse

Jim, while I share some of your concerns, your proposed solution is a bit draconian. Independant of that, do you not see the irony of posting your diatribe on multiple threads on which you don't bother to comment on the subject at hand?

Posted by: bsimon | October 25, 2007 11:28 AM | Report abuse

CC, Please limit the comment section to one comment per IP address per story. The comment section in each story you write is hijacked by around 5 to 7 users who take over the comments section with an ongoing discussion that degenerates into a chat room. In each of your articles, I usually see a few attempts at the beginning for people interested in politics to respond to your particular story and then the ongoing chat takes over with these people who are using the large following of your column to get their remarks and discussions read by a wide audience. When an interested reader goes to the comments section and see that instead of intelligent (or even stupid) reactions to your column they have entered a closed world of a few who are having a long running conversation that extends from Fix column to Fix column, the reader rightly infers that his/her comment will be lost in the ongoing insular discussion. These regular posters would still be able to post a comment on each article. I'm sure they'll call me names and you too if you go ahead with this, but it's your blog and the comments should be helpful to you in terms of feedback, and to the readers trying to see if there are other opinions that enhance or undermine your position, not a quasi-blog for those who can't get an audience otherwise.

Posted by: JimSheridan | October 25, 2007 11:25 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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