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Friday Senate Line: 60 in Sight?


New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

What was once only a pipe dream is starting to look like a real possibility.

Friday Line

We speak not of Britney Spears' musical comeback but rather the prospect of Democrats controlling 60 seats -- a filibuster-proof majority -- following the November election.

In a huddle with reporters earlier this week in Washington, Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Chairman Chuck Schumer (N.Y.) acknowledged that his party's chances of reaching the 60-seat plateau were "better than they were two weeks ago" -- the result of an across-the-board collapse in Republican numbers due to the economic crisis and handling of the bailout bill by Congress. (Yes, we know Democrats control the House and Senate. But, the American public overwhelmingly blamed President Bush and House Republicans for the initial failure of the "rescue" legislation.)

And, respected non-partisan observers are also beginning to openly speculate about the possibility. In a must-read column earlier this week, Stu Rothenberg wrote: "Where I once wrote in this space that Democrats had a chance of reaching 60 seats in 2010, I now can't rule out 60 seats for this November."

Our take? Sixty seats for Democrats remains something less than a 50-50 proposition but a relatively plausible path to a filibuster-proof majority does exist.

Four Republican-held seats -- Virginia, New Mexico, Colorado and New Hampshire -- are either done deals for Democrats or getting there. In at least four others -- North Carolina, Oregon, Minnesota and Alaska -- the Republican incumbent is either tied or trailing their Democratic challenger.

That's eight seats where Democrats have any even money or better shot at takeovers on Nov. 4. And, assuming they can reelect Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) they must pick off one of three seats to get to 60: Kentucky, Georgia or Mississippi. (Scroll down to see which of that trio we believe presents Democrats with their best chance.)

Could Democrats run the table? Yes. The decided tilt of the national environment toward their party has grown even more pronounced in recent weeks. But, Kentucky, Georgia and Mississippi are less than friendly territory for Democrats at the federal level and the GOP incumbents in each state are doing everything they can to avoid being washed away in the wave.

Stay tuned.

As always, the number one ranked race on the Line is the most likely to switch parties in the fall. Agree or disagree with our picks? The comments section (eagerly) awaits.

To the Line!

10. Louisiana (D): Democrats are increasingly publicly confident about Landrieu's chances at reelection but the DSCC's decision to begin spending money on television against state Treasurer John Kennedy (R) belies that they still retain some nervousness about her chances. Republicans are taking an interesting strategic tact in this race -- painting the Landrieu race as voters' chance to continue the cleanup of Louisiana politics that began with the election of Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) last year. In a neutral political year, Landrieu would be in deep trouble. But this is not a normal political year. (Previous ranking: 9)

9. Kentucky (R): This election cycle has taught us to never say never in politics. We never thought Sen. Mitch McConnell, one of the savviest political minds in American politics, would be in a real race against Bruce Lunsford (D), whose sole distinction in politics before this race was two unsuccessful gubernatorial bids over the past five years. And yet, public polling of late has shown McConnell and Lunsford in a dead heat and the DSCC is now on TV bashing McConnell on the bailout. Will the underfunded National Republican Senatorial Committee respond in kind? And, if not, can McConnell withstand the ad onslaught? (Previous ranking: N/A)

8. Alaska (R): It's virtually impossible to handicap this race. Almost everything hangs on the outcome of the federal trial of Sen. Ted Stevens (R) currently in progress in Washington. The prosecution rested on Thursday, and Stevens's defense is now underway. If Stevens is convicted on any of the corruption charges against him, Anchorage Mayor Mark Begich (D) is the next Senator from the Last Frontier. If Stevens is acquitted, he could well win reelection. Fascinating stuff. (Previous ranking: 5)

7. Minnesota (R): The last 14 days have not been kind to Sen. Norm Coleman. Just when it looked like he was building a small but significant edge over comedian Al Franken (D), the economic crisis hit -- bringing the race back to dead even. And now Coleman is caught up in allegations over whether or not he accepted suits from a contributor -- a controversy that caused, perhaps, the most awkward press conference in the history of politics earlier this week. Independent candidate Dean Barkley remains the x-factor in the contest; he is gaining support by the day but who does his rise hurt more? (Previous ranking: 7)

6. Oregon (R): Democratic strategists told us almost 18 months ago that Sen. Gordon Smith was going to lose. And, even after a series of high-profile recruiting failures left them with the less-than-impressive state Rep. Jeff Merkley (D) as their candidate, these same strategists stuck by their prediction on Smith. And, if recent polling is to be believed, they were right. Smith seems stuck in the low to mid 40s, not a great place for an incumbent to be a month before the election -- especially one who sits in a decidedly Democratic-leaning state. (Previous ranking: 6)

5. North Carolina (R): Sen. Elizabeth Dole is nearing the point of no return in her reelection bid against state Sen. Kay Hagan (D). A series of recent polls show Hagan ahead and party strategists say that internal polling confirms the public results. What happened? The DSCC effectively cast Dole as someone with tenuous (at best) ties to the Tarheel State and who stood too close to President George W. Bush over the last six years. And now, with 26 days before the election, Dole is on television with a 60-second ad trying to reassert her ties to the state. Not good. (Previous ranking: 8)

4. New Hampshire (R): In the three polls conducted in the race between Sen. John Sununu and former Governor Jeanne Shaheen (D) this month, the Democrat has leads of nine, eight and five points. More troublesome for Sununu is that he has trailed in this contest since it began nearly two years ago. Incumbents who spend that long behind almost never win. (Previous ranking: 4)

3. Colorado (R): Almost no one on either side of the political aisle believes that former Rep. Bob Schaffer (R) is going to beat Rep. Mark Udall (D). And yet, despite the well-documented struggles of Schaffer, Udall has yet to put the race out of reach. Why not? That question haunts paranoid Democratic strategists. (Previous ranking: 3)

2. New Mexico (R): The only question left to ponder in this open-seat contest is whether Rep. Heather Wilson (R) could have kept it closer against Rep. Tom Udall (D) than has Rep. Steve Pearce (R). Probably but it's hard to imagine either Republican winning in this climate. (Previous ranking: 2)

1. Virginia (R): O-V-E-R. (Previous ranking: 1)

By Chris Cillizza  |  October 10, 2008; 6:00 AM ET
Categories:  Senate , The Line  
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Next: McCain Opens Pandora's Box

Comments

Definitions of Socialism on the Web:

An economic system in which the basic means of production are primarily owned and controlled collectively by the government under some system or An "economic, social and political doctrine which expresses the struggle for the equal distribution of wealth by eventually eliminating private property and the exploitative ruling class . Hey, Obama voters are you listening ? Or are you blind folded and walking the plank ! Democrat not voting for Obama.
Best wishes,

Democrat from Michigan

Posted by: dhagan1 | October 15, 2008 4:00 PM | Report abuse

Dems greatest friend ever GEORGE BUSH...bye GOP senators..

I say Roll Obama Roll,...those GOP senators I Don't know....roll roll Roll Obama Roll....

Posted by: grandstreetfund | October 14, 2008 8:06 PM | Report abuse

Keep dreaming.

Pelosi, Chuck Schmoker et al will be voted out.

If we the people don't forget or chicken out at voting time, we will vote out all these bums that sold themselves to the Wall Street vultures.

Chuck, your are toast, history.

Posted by: coqui44 | October 13, 2008 1:16 AM | Report abuse

Keep dreaming.

Pelosi, Chuck Schmoker et al will be voted out.

If we the people don't forget or chicken out at voting time, we will vote out all these bums that sold themselves to the Wall Street vultures.

Chuck, your are toast, history.

Posted by: coqui44 | October 13, 2008 1:15 AM | Report abuse

Keep dreaming.

Pelosi, Chuck Schmoker et al will be voted out.

If we the people don't forget or chicken out at voting time, we will vote out all these bums that sold themselves to the Wall Street vultures.

Chuck, your are toast, history.

Posted by: coqui44 | October 13, 2008 1:13 AM | Report abuse

There is a perhaps element to the polls that isn't getting noticed. IF "Predictive Market Bids", where interested parties bid on on some concept, because over time such bidding is supposed to be highly predictive, means anything, NONE of the toss up states is much in doubt. They basically are all running much stronger than 2 to 1 for Obama.

While such markets are skewed to the tech happy crowd, they also reflect the segment of the population that telephone polls tend to miss. So factor in the nearly 80% to 20 % bidding on Obama in Ohio, and the vaguely 3% lead he holds in Real Clear politics average of the polls may be low by a good deal more than its stated margin of error.

If all the tossup or better states go Obama, RCP suggests that Obama gets 380 electoral votes.

AND the economy probably hasn't finished blowing holes in JSM's economic bona fides. another negative 1000on the DOW over the next week and John is hockey puct grade toast.

Just three weeks and a wake up, and Moose and Squirrel (not my characterization) can go home to their respective conservative strong holds and try to hide from the real fact finding that is coming.

And the strains of the roraing twenties hit, "Good bye, good bye, to everything" play merrily in the RNC's background.

Posted by: ceflynline | October 13, 2008 12:07 AM | Report abuse

The shift of electoral votes in 2010 isn't likely to fundamentally shift which areas of the country have to be won; if Democrats do a good job and gain popularity in our current battlegrounds its unlikely the Republicans will ever regain the power they have enjoyed.

Of far more intrest is how this shift in population to the south and west is diluting these traditional Republican strongholds. Its a simple fact that traditional mindsets are nearly impossible to reconstruct once they are broken. With floods of liberals from the coasts spreading into more rural areas, traditional mindsets are being challenged in a way they haven't been before, and in many cases it is breaking conservative support at a grassroots level.

An example of this is my hometown, a rural midwestern town of 2500 people, where many of the highschool teachers are now liberals, and there is a growing minority community. There are even openly homosexual people. The next generation is growing up in a diversity of thought and culture the likes of which I never imagined would happen in my lifetime, and that makes it very hard for youth to become excited about conservative values. These pop culture events with president Bush and the economy might win an election a month from now, but ultimately what will kill the conservative movement will be the liberal migration to rural America. Whether this is good or bad I don't pretend to guess, but that is the reality.

Posted by: Laughing | October 12, 2008 4:55 PM | Report abuse

Obama is a hypocrat? They like to hang around in rivers in Africa right?

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | October 12, 2008 1:30 AM | Report abuse

Obama's probably going to carry both Minnesota and Oregon by double-digits and the enthusiasm gap will likely be enough to elect both Merkley and Franken from those states. Dole appears dead-in-the-water, so it appears the likely D pickup is 7, bringing the number of seats to 58, if Lieberman is included. I'm not sure he should be since he's likely to be stripped of his Committee chairmanship in the next Congress. Taking Kentucky would be awesome, but it still seems unlikely. I think Mississippi and Georgia might be just out of reach.

Obama is now likely to win a minimum of 52% of the National Popular Vote, with 55% probably the ceiling. A 52% victory will translate into a minimum of 306 Electoral Votes, possibly 333 depending upon Florida. If he gets to 53% he probably also adds North Carolina and Nevada, which would push the EV total to 353. The absolute EV ceiling appears to be 380 which would include carryiing West Virginia, Missouri and Indiana. That scenario is unlikely, but if the Democratic Presidential percentage is 54-55% nationally, it is possible.

The effects of census redistribution of Congressional seats is likely to favor R's, however, many states currently have been redistricted to favor Republicans. As we enter a Democratic era presaged by across-the-board D gains in 2006, to be further imprinted in 2008, Democrats are going to control the Redistricting process to a greater extent than in the previous two decades across the states and will have greater opportunity to draw favorable Congressional District and Legislative District Maps.

The conservative movement within the Republican Party is out of ideas, out of gas, and out of time. We are about to enter upon a 21st-century New Deal-type era.

Posted by: OHIOCITIZEN | October 11, 2008 5:47 PM | Report abuse

"You obviously have no reading comprehension skills as the projected shift in seats show a gain in Texas (4), Georgia (2), Florida (2) Utah (1), Nevada (1), North Carolina (1) to name a few.

Please take the time to read the projected shift in seats, then run your mouth.

Posted by: Digital_Voter"


Digital_Voter: please take the time to research and read DEMOGRAPHIC, PARTY REGISTRATION AND COUNTY VOTING trends during the past 3 yrs in TX, NV, FL, NC -- and even GA. The percent of Latino voters, Democratic party registration, and Democratic party vote in Congressional and local elections at the COUNTY level in those states shows continuing, and in some cases, dramatic, increases.

Those states may end up with increased Congressional seats after the next reapportionment -- but -- if trends of the past 3 years continue for the next 3 yrs -- those seats will be occupied by Democrats.

Digital_Voter: like so many right wing, neocon Republicans -- you accept fantasy as bogus fact -- and then come to some totally wrong conclusion -- instead of looking at the details and the CONTEXT of the subject -- and then figuring out what the likely results will be.

Go back to school and learn how to do research. LesG

Posted by: les_ca | October 11, 2008 3:15 PM | Report abuse

I'm really not surprised to see Elizabeth Dole trending down (and probably out), especially when it came out that she's been in North Carolina approximately 2 months in the past 2 years. I was actually surprised she didn't retire this year--not because she was likely to lose, but because she's pretty clearly not moving up the ladder in politics, and her husband is retired and sitting around waiting for her to join him. It looks like it might happen anyway.

Posted by: Budikavlan | October 11, 2008 1:39 PM | Report abuse

"shows that republican or swing states in the South and West will be picking up plenty of electoral votes."

you haven't been following politics if you think that the south and west are still republican.
--------------------------------

You obviously have no reading comprehension skills as the projected shift in seats show a gain in Texas (4), Georgia (2), Florida (2) Utah (1), Nevada (1), North Carolina (1) to name a few.

Please take the time to read the projected shift in seats, then run your mouth.

Posted by: Digital_Voter | October 10, 2008 6:44 PM | Report abuse

Bill Ayers is not in jail. He is a RESPECTED professor at the University of Illinois, involved in education reform.

Where is Chrisitian forgiveness? Where is Chrisitian compassion? Where is Christian understanding? Turning the other cheek? Not the American Christian!

Your pastor may be proud, but your Savior somewhere is weeping. And isn't pride itself a sin?

Is this country only going to be able to heal the wounds of the Vietnam War only when everyone is dead? Are we that incorrigible a society?

Surely somewhere Jesus is weeping.

Posted by: ethanquern | October 10, 2008 4:17 PM | Report abuse

"shows that republican or swing states in the South and West will be picking up plenty of electoral votes."

you haven't been following politics if you think that the south and west are still republican.

Posted by: newagent99 | October 10, 2008 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Democrats - Don't get to excited for long-term dominance. The 2010 reapportionment is not that far away and the population data, as of 2007 shows that republican or swing states in the South and West will be picking up plenty of electoral votes.

The Northeast, as usual, will be taking the losses.

http://www.polidata.org/census/est007dl.htm

Posted by: Digital_Voter | October 10, 2008 2:48 PM | Report abuse

The NRCC is cutting ad buys for two races in Minnesota - Paulsen, running for Ramstad's open seat in the 3rd & Bachmann, the freshman who's trying to hold on to her seat in the 6th.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/collections/special/columns/polinaut/archive/2008/10/nrcc_cancels_an.shtml

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 10, 2008 2:48 PM | Report abuse

Democrats will win in 08 big, but they will not get to 60. The only races that are truly done are Virginia & New Mexico. John Warner just endorsed Mark Warner over Gilmore in Va. Why does that matter? Because J. Warner will be stumping in Va. for McCain & M. Warner simultaneously. Can Obama ride Warner's coattails to win Va? Or will J. Warner help McCain pull out 1 last hoorah? In NM, Pete Domenici is suppossed to be really helping Pearce on the trail & in commercials. Will it be enough to even make it a race? In Colorodo, Udall can't put Schaffer away and the most recent poll I saw was Udall 44%-Schaffer 38%. This one isn't over, nor is McCain vs. Obama in Colorodo, which is also tightening. New Hampshire is an interesting toss up state for McCain vs. Obama. If McCain can win it, he may carry Sununu through. If Obama wins, Shaheen is the next US Senator from NH. Ky, Miss & Ga. will all very likely stay Republican. All have strong incumbents running for reelection. In La., it looks like Liendrieu will retain her seat. In Minn., Coleman still has a slight edge to retain the seat. In NC, it will be a close one in my home state. It's turned to a true toss up. In Oregon, my guess is that Gordon Smith will pull it out again.

Posted by: reason5 | October 10, 2008 2:44 PM | Report abuse

Put a fork in the GOP. This smells like 1932 again. Dems will control the House, Senate, and WH for the next 20 yrs. Thanks for screwing the nation, GOP, come back when you have some ideas on how to govern and not just how to hate. I never thought the GOP would devolve into the Klan, but all you see at McPalin rallies are chubby middle-aged angry white people. Very angry people. Sad.

Posted by: vfazio | October 10, 2008 2:22 PM | Report abuse

I wish the candidate would discuss global poverty more. According to The Borgen Project:
$30 billion: Annual shortfall to end world hunger.
$540 billion: Annual U.S. Defense Budget

Posted by: maryna1 | October 10, 2008 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Obama True Hypocrat and Liar

Hides his previous connections with Ayers

Disowns Pastor when not needed any more(who know he can disown country too)

Can speak ( as today) but cannot vote against torture

Supporter but not follower of election reforms( words speak louder than action as is always case with Obama)

Supports Hope, Freedom but votes for Spy agencies tapping our Phone

cannot accept Surge Worked , he might be in bad position

Biden a Fool
He thinks Obama is not fit when he runs for president otherwise he is Fit

Obama is naive,has unknown family history

inexperienced like bush was in his first term.

His economic policies will ruin small business,

His health care plan will be a costly affair,

His tax plans would scare investors to other parts of world.

He speaks of alternative energy, opposed to drilling natural gas and building nuclear energy

We consume things at low price because Big corporations get tax cuts their spendign on innovations

If Big companies are taxed heavily , there will lose of jobs , loss of technical edge, higher priced commodities,higher cost of living

Mccain is attacking Root of problem mortegage Obama only wants to attach republicans he has no solid plan.

Obams lack of effectiveness showed up when he responded for russian attach on Georgia and opposition to surge

Mccain all years of experience brings balance and judgement to postion which wasnt there in Bush and Obama due to their in experience,Palen brings freshness of change and executive experience of reforms that she carried in alaska

Posted by: mrn744 | October 10, 2008 1:50 PM | Report abuse

Democrats for John McCain and Sarah Palin in 2008

Posted by: hclark1 | October 10, 2008 1:36 PM | Report abuse

Xanadu3 - You misunderstand. A veto-proof majority is 2/3. The drive for 60 is to have a FILIBUSTER proof majority.

kareric - Lieberman caucuses with the Democrats (as does the independent senator from Vermont) and largely votes with them. Just with the exception of the war (and I recognize that's like saying "other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how was the play?"

Democrats hold all the committee chairs (well, except Joe's) and set the agenda.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | October 10, 2008 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Do Americans really want liberals to not only control the senate; but have a veto proof majority?

Posted by: Xanadu3 | October 10, 2008 7:57 AM
-----
How did you feel for the first 6 years of GW?

Posted by: JRM2 | October 10, 2008 1:07 PM | Report abuse

Dunn Brothers! I still miss their coffee. I used to drop by the one on Grand Avenue near Macalester.

Just shows that the Fix has good taste!

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | October 10, 2008 1:05 PM | Report abuse

NOTHING LIFT NOW FOR MCCAIN OTHER THEN THE WACHKO FRING. LONG TIME REPUBLICAN SUPPORTERS ARE JUST WALKING AWAY FROM HIM SHACKING THEIR HEADS.

In my little circle I have converted a whole family (five voters) who used to get mad when they would see me waring my Obama shirt. I just today delivered them an Obama yard sign. John Mccain and Sarah Palin are cancers on the republican party and they are infecting all around them. It could not happen to a better group of people. Mccain just gave a speech and never mentioned the stock market once. He is like a kid who closes his eyes and think you can't see him. He is so full of self delusion it is amazing.


GOP Former Gov: "He Is Not The McCain I Endorsed"
Rachel Weiner October 10, 2008 11:14 AM


Former Republican Governor of Michigan William Milliken tells the Grand Rapids Press that he's "disappointed" in John McCain and the campaign he is running:

He endorsed John McCain in the presidential primary, but now former Republican Gov. William Milliken is expressing doubts about his party's nominee.

"He is not the McCain I endorsed," said Milliken, reached at his Traverse City home Thursday. "He keeps saying, 'Who is Barack Obama?' I would ask the question, 'Who is John McCain?' because his campaign has become rather disappointing to me.

"I'm disappointed in the tenor and the personal attacks on the part of the McCain campaign, when he ought to be talking about the issues."

Posted by: popasmoke | October 10, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Hey Republicans: Want to win as many elections as possible?

Then give smart people in America a reason to vote for your party.

Posted by: JRM2 | October 10, 2008 1:00 PM | Report abuse

The Republicans need 60 senate seats to hold a filibuster proof majority in the Senate. The Democrats need 75-80 seats to hold a filibuster proof majority. There is simply no way to get 60 Democrats to agree to vote yes on a bill.

The Fix is also forgetting AZ. In the unlikely event McCain wins, what are the odds the AZ governor would appoint a Republican to replace McCain?

Posted by: caribis | October 10, 2008 12:53 PM | Report abuse

The rout of the Republicans (if it happens) might actually be a good thing for the GOP.

It would allow for a complete rebuilding from the ground up of a fiscally conservative, socially moderate coalition, devoid of undue influence from bible thumpers and neo-fascists.

The Civil Rights Act could not pass Lyndon Johnson's democratic congress - too many southern democrats opposed it.

It was moderate Republicans led by Everett Dirkson and Jacob Javits that provided the margin of victory.

Country first - they were the living embodiment of that motion.

Posted by: toritto | October 10, 2008 12:52 PM | Report abuse

I'm amazed that people just blithely state that the Democrats "control" the Senate. Two points: (1) The 51st "Democrat" is Joe Lieberman; hardly a vote the Democrats can count on, particularly on issues involving the "war on terror" and Iraq, and (2) The Republicans have engaged in an unrelenting campaign of filibusters previously unimaginable. Without a filibuster-proof majority, absolutely nothing will get done in the Senate.

Posted by: kareric | October 10, 2008 12:50 PM | Report abuse

Hey Chris -

Love the line as always. Saw you at Dunn Bros in St Paul. Keep up the good work.

My only disagreement is #10. Landrieu has a ton more money, has run a solid campaign and has the national winds and AA turnout in her favor. AND she leads by an average of 15 points with about 55% in polling. She and Collins of Maine are the mirror images of each other. Each has forged a moderate image in a hostile state and is winning handily in a race against a credible opponent. This looks like safe to me or at least safer than:

My #10: Musgrove/Wicker MS-B. Musgrove has trailed by an average of 4.5 and Wicker hasn't broken 50% since late August. Wicker's financial advantage will diminish in the last month and Musgrove populism will match the current anger against the bailout very well (Wicker voted against it too, i know). And there's that AA turnout.

or
#11: Martin/Chambliss GA
Chambliss' margin is only 3.8 and he voted FOR the bailout so he makes a good target. And there's that AA turnout. The only negatives for Martin are the latest (post-bailout) polls show Chambliss at 50% and the DSCC will have to throw a significant chunk of $ to help out Martin.

Posted by: stpaulsage | October 10, 2008 12:40 PM | Report abuse

.

.

Irony Does Reveal Truth This Article was published on Sept 11 a few hours before the attacks.


THE QUESTION IS OBAMA'S JUDGEMENT WHEN OBAMA WAS IN HIS 30s WHY DID OBAMA CHOOSE TO BE THIS PERSON'S FRIEND WHEN OBAMA WAS AN ADULT ??


IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH OBAMA WHEN HE WAS 8 YEARS OLD.


OBAMA HAS BEEN LYING ABOUT HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH AYERS - CLINTON WAS A LIAR TOO. (CONVICTED LIAR)


No Regrets for a Love Of Explosives; In a Memoir of Sorts, a War Protester Talks of Life With the Weathermen


By DINITIA SMITH
Published: September 11, 2001

''I don't regret setting bombs,'' Bill Ayers said. ''I feel we didn't do enough.'' Mr. Ayers, who spent the 1970's as a fugitive in the Weather Underground, was sitting in the kitchen of his big turn-of-the-19th-century stone house in the Hyde Park district of Chicago.

The long curly locks in his Wanted poster are shorn, though he wears earrings. He still has tattooed on his neck the rainbow-and-lightning Weathermen logo that appeared on letters taking responsibility for bombings. And he still has the ebullient, ingratiating manner, the apparently intense interest in other people, that made him a charismatic figure in the radical student movement.

Now he has written a book, ''Fugitive Days'' (Beacon Press, September). Mr. Ayers, who is 56, calls it a memoir, somewhat coyly perhaps, since he also says some of it is fiction.

He writes that he participated in the bombings of New York City Police Headquarters in 1970, of the Capitol building in 1971, the Pentagon in 1972. But Mr. Ayers also seems to want to have it both ways, taking responsibility for daring acts in his youth, then deflecting it.

''Is this, then, the truth?,'' he writes. ''Not exactly. Although it feels entirely honest to me.''
But why would someone want to read a memoir parts of which are admittedly not true? Mr. Ayers was asked.

''Obviously, the point is it's a reflection on memory,'' he answered. ''It's true as I remember it.''

Mr. Ayers is probably safe from prosecution anyway. A spokeswoman for the Justice Department said there was a five-year statute of limitations on Federal crimes except in cases of murder or when a person has been indicted.

Mr. Ayers, who in 1970 was said to have summed up the Weatherman philosophy as: ''Kill all the rich people. Break up their cars and apartments. Bring the revolution home, kill your parents, that's where it's really at,'' is today distinguished professor of education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. And he says he doesn't actually remember suggesting that rich people be killed or that people kill their parents, but ''it's been quoted so many times I'm beginning to think I did,'' he said. ''It was a joke about the distribution of wealth.''

He went underground in 1970, after his girlfriend, Diana Oughton, and two other people were killed when bombs they were making exploded in a Greenwich Village town house. With him in the Weather Underground was Bernardine Dohrn, who was put on the F.B.I.'s 10 Most Wanted List. J. Edgar Hoover called her ''the most dangerous woman in America'' and ''la Pasionara of the Lunatic Left.'' Mr. Ayers and Ms. Dohrn later married.

In his book Mr. Ayers describes the Weathermen descending into a ''whirlpool of violence.''

''Everything was absolutely ideal on the day I bombed the Pentagon,'' he writes. But then comes a disclaimer: ''Even though I didn't actually bomb the Pentagon -- we bombed it, in the sense that Weathermen organized it and claimed it.'' He goes on to provide details about the manufacture of the bomb and how a woman he calls Anna placed the bomb in a restroom. No one was killed or injured, though damage was extensive.

Between 1970 and 1974 the Weathermen took responsibility for 12 bombings, Mr. Ayers writes, and also helped spring Timothy Leary (sentenced on marijuana charges) from jail.

.


.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 10, 2008 11:50 AM | Report abuse


"no one in their right mind is going to conclude that an inexperienced empty suit former cocainehead should lead the Largest Economy on Earth."

He was reelected in 2004, wasn't he?

Burn!

I'd like to add that nothing says "unhinged" quite like using ALL CAPS to add emphasis. I am impressed that it only took one comment to compare GOP rallies to the Nazis.

Posted by: aceofspades | October 10, 2008 11:40 AM | Report abuse

I'm confused. Where are the two page long diatribes about Obama being a terrorist and McCain being a dog raper? There are some serious and intelligent posts here. I'm very uncomfortable with this.

Posted by: msmith97 | October 10, 2008 11:24 AM | Report abuse

So comment registration didn't do much to stop the flood of unrelated multi-post smears, I see; sigh.

Regarding the actual subject of the thread, honestly I would take Landrieu off the top ten at this point; she's built up a solid polling lead in what will be a Democratic year (even if she's in a red state). Bump Mississippi or Georgia up, which are tight, but are feasible.

As to the earlier comment about Musgrove needing ticket-splitters to win in Mississippi, three of the four Congressional seats in that state are held by Democrats, so it's a safe bet that plenty of voters will be voting for McCain and then down-ballot Dems.

Sixty seats is in sight; they'd need an inside straight to win, but they managed that in 2006, so if things continue to go their way it's possible.

As to the idea that Democratic control of Congress will or should blunt the anti-Republican tide, that didn't work for Herbert Hoover in 1932; the Dems had taken over Congress in 1930, indeed, FDR's running mate was the Speaker of the House, but the Republicans still got slaughtered.

Posted by: scurley1 | October 10, 2008 11:12 AM | Report abuse

Looks good. In Oregon, Merkley just debated Smith and came off as having a greater command of detail than the Senator. His aggressive style seemed to have thrown Smith off his stride as the debate wore on. With Obama campaign working the turn out hard, this race is firming up in Merkley's favor.

Posted by: johnsonc2 | October 10, 2008 11:12 AM | Report abuse

Thank you to those who followed Optimyst's lament with on point posts.

I watched the Cornyn-Noriega debate and the Libertarian candidate was given equal time. The short of this is that as weak a senator as Cornyn is and as strong a bio as COl. Rick has, the debate could not have hurt Cornyn much.

The longer story is that they were dull compared to the chipper and enthusiastic libertarian lady who was by turns sincerely devoted to civil liberties and to a strong military but opposed to all else.

And Cornyn's head is as big as Barry Bonds'.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 10, 2008 10:58 AM | Report abuse

I find it intriguing that some people who are commenting don't quite get what Chris' article was about, beyond the race handicapping.

Yes, Democrats have controlled Congress, but due to the Senate rules and voting along strict party lines, no significant legislation that could have helped avoid the financial (and other crises) has been able to pass.

One of the key problems in the meltdown, for example, was the bankruptcy law change made early in the Bush Administration that eliminated the ability to renegotiate mortgages in bankruptcy court.

That alone has turned out to be huge, and should have been part of the original bailout legislation.

Why not? Our Republican friends in Congress, and "Country First" candidate!

You know, "our friend"!

Posted by: jwallace1 | October 10, 2008 10:52 AM | Report abuse


IS JOHN MCCAIN MAYBE THE WORST AMERICAN TRAITOR SINCE BENEDICT ARNOLD

If Obama is so bad, why did Mccain not bring all this to the publics attention before? Wy did he let a terrorist sit in the United States senate and say nothing? If all this is true and Mccain had all this information about Obama, much like "I know how to catch Bin laden" and he has been keeping it a secret till it would serve him politically then he may be one of the worst traitors in American history right next to Benedict Arnold.
Mcain says, "I know how to fix the economy", I know how to win the war", I know how to catch Bin Laden", I know how to stop the terrorists" These are Mccains exact words. WHY IS HE KEEPING ALL THIS SECRET? Is it an attempt to blackmail the american people? If he loses will he help the next president do all these things with the secret information he professes to have?
JOHN MCCAIN IS EITHER ONE OF AMERICAS GREATEST LIARS OR ONE OF IT'S WORST TRAITORS.

Posted by: popasmoke | October 10, 2008 10:43 AM | Report abuse

jdunph1 writes
"I'd put Mississippi ahead of Kentucky. There are few undecideds in that race. But Musgrove is still close enough to win. I think we're going to win both."

Are there many ticket splitters in MS? For Musgrove to win, it seems like voters would be going for McCain, the other GOP Senator, then vote D for Senate seat B. Is that plausible?

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 10, 2008 10:38 AM | Report abuse

"If McCain were to win the Presidency, would Gov. Napolitano (D) be able to appoint his replacement in the Senate or would a special election have to be held?"


That has been discussed here before. I may be wrong, but what I remember is that Gov Napolitano would be obliged to replace Sen McCain with someone from his party.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 10, 2008 10:35 AM | Report abuse

Chris,
We just finished a very succesful month and year of registering Democratic voters here in Baton Rouge. That's why you see Mary Landrieu with more than a 10-point lead. She is going to coast. I'd put Mississippi ahead of Kentucky. There are few undecideds in that race. But Musgrove is still close enough to win. I think we're going to win both.
Jimmy

Posted by: jdunph1 | October 10, 2008 10:34 AM | Report abuse

MScholarC04 writes
"I think Alaska and Minnesota should be swapped. Barkley's likely to sway votes away from Franken to help Coleman, while even a not guilty verdict doesn't necessarily mean Stevens would be labeled innocent. "

You make a plausible argument about swapping AK & MN, except for the assumption that Barkley pulls more from Franken than Coleman. Neither major-party candidate's support is strong, Barkley's team has claimed that they're attracting as many Repubs as Dems. Given the incessent run of negative ads from Coleman & Franken, its not at all clear that Minnesotan's won't spurn both & go for door #3. The real question is the ticket-splitters. Obama will easliy win here; will people vote straight-ticket for Dems, or will they split? I'm thinking we'll see a lot of split tickets - and Coleman won't necessarily benefit more from that than Barkley. Barkley is a safe backup choice for Dems that don't care for Franken and for Repubs tired of Coleman. Perhaps not enough to win, but certainly enough to keep the outcome in doubt.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 10, 2008 10:30 AM | Report abuse

Surely we won't have anothe DemocRATic Congress? They need to go before they are put in jail!! If I were Barney I would slither out the side door. No one can "fix" the economy. It's not a broken toy. It will have to rightitself,remember what goes up goes down etc. We can't amnesty that is too expensive! Obama is going to be so costly! We will be driven to Scoalism. McCain is a known.

Posted by: nnhavlik | October 10, 2008 10:27 AM | Report abuse

Let Lieberman go. There will be a Democratic majority for organizational purposes, and his overall alignment won't significantly affect his vote on individual matters anyway. He's more worried about Connecticut voters than about party leadership.

Let him have whatever minority committee positions the Republicans want to give him, and serve as a reminder to everyone there's a price for political treachery.

Posted by: FlownOver | October 10, 2008 10:24 AM | Report abuse

Posters who try to connect Obama with Ayers and think that will make any difference in this election are nuts! We have endured 8 years of the most negligent and narcistic administration ever! I am "mad as hell" and realize the Dems are somewhat responsible for the huge financial fiasco.....but the Republicans have been in power for years and have done nothing but run up huge deficits, engaged Americans in a senseless war, ignored health care issues, education, infrastructure problems.....and Republicans/right wingers/conservatives, THINK WE ARE STUPID ENOUGH TO VOTE THEM IN AGAIN. Get a life....accept the fact that you have screwed up royally and will not be forgiven for years to come. I don't care what Obama and the Democrats do, it can't be as bad as the past 8 years!

Posted by: pegwelch | October 10, 2008 10:09 AM | Report abuse

Don't rule out Andrew Rice of Oklahoma...he has whupped up on the dumbest member of the U.S. Senate, Jim Inhofe: http://soonerthought.blogspot.com/2008/10/andrew-rice-whups-up-on-dimwit-inhofe.html

Posted by: soonerthought | October 10, 2008 9:44 AM | Report abuse

I think Alaska and Minnesota should be swapped. Barkley's likely to sway votes away from Franken to help Coleman, while even a not guilty verdict doesn't necessarily mean Stevens would be labeled innocent. Begich and the DSCC should take the route Palin and Jindal took in their successful races to say, "Remove the corruption and tarnished officials from the Senate. Let me clean up government."

Also as important for the Democrats to get that 60-seat majority: keeping their tongues in check against Lieberman so he doesn't decide to caucus with the Republicans.

Question though, Chris: If McCain were to win the Presidency, would Gov. Napolitano (D) be able to appoint his replacement in the Senate or would a special election have to be held? That would be an interesting twist: a Republican in the White House but with a 60-seat Senate majority of the opposite party to deal with...

-Chris L.

Posted by: MScholarC04 | October 10, 2008 9:36 AM | Report abuse

This used to be a place we could gather and discuss Chris' much anticipated Friday Line with wit and sometimes humor. It is sad that the unthinking forces of partisanship have made a shambles of one of the high points of the week. Hopefully, in another month, the Fix can regain its old feel.

Posted by: optimyst | October 10, 2008 9:31 AM | Report abuse

Since the Democrats have controlled both Houses, and have led the committees that refused to bring needed oversight to the banks and Wall St, then by all means....let's elect even more Democrats to clean up the mess they made?

I mean, you must give credit where credit is due. Our mainstream press has been pounding the daily message "it's the Republicans fault" into the heads of the populace for weeks, even though the facts say otherwise.

I have to assume most of our journalists can do math (although maybe I'm wildly optomistic), so the Democrats didn't need a single Republican to vote on the bail-out bill to get it to pass. But that didn't stop the left-leaning media's mantra that 'it was conservative Republicans that defeated the initial bail-out vote'. Ummm, no it wasn't. It was Democrats, who there were plenty of that could have voted to pass it regardless of what Republicans did.

So you have to applaud the press's efforts to swing the elections in the Democrats favor. At least they have done their part to set this election up on a tee. Now it's just up to Obama and the Democrats not to swing and whiff.

Posted by: dbw1 | October 10, 2008 9:28 AM | Report abuse

We can only hope that the GOP is finished. They have left a legacy of wars, death, hatred, and now socialism. What more can they do to us. ........
http://thefiresidepost.com/2008/10/09/the-gop-legacy-wars-death-hatred-socialism/

Posted by: glclark4750 | October 10, 2008 9:25 AM | Report abuse

I have no real argument with your assessment, only to comment that the Alaska situation just amazes me.

How do you see the Nevada races stacking up?

I was interested to see what the Russians thought of the "Republican brand" in this article about Gov. Palin. It seems there could be even bigger problems than global financial meltdown and class warfare...

http://english.pravda.ru/opinion/columnists/12-09-2008/106354-palindevil-0

Posted by: jwallace1 | October 10, 2008 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Saying the Democrats will have a veto proof majority is like saying the 'bluedog' conservatives are slaves from the old South. Especially with lunkhead Chucky Schumer attempting to lead them. I've always considered Chucky to be a thinking mans Alcee Hastings and Maxine Waters joined at the hip.

Posted by: usarownow | October 10, 2008 9:06 AM | Report abuse

Elizabeth Dole's loss would be worrying longer term for the GOP given that Richard Burr holds the next-up "jinx" North Carolina seat that no-one has held for more than a single term from since 1981...

Posted by: adamgray | October 10, 2008 9:02 AM | Report abuse

I can see why Republicans would be mad this year. Their president has let a financial meltdown occur (where is Bush nowadays anyways?!?) and their nominee admits to not knowing anything about the economy and thinks it is strong. Can we say OOOOPS! I thought the so called "liberal left" was supposed to be the mad ones?? McCain's rallies are turning into hate-spewing, ignorant loving gatherings - not a good spot to be in less than a month before an election. NO candidate has ever won an election by being nasty or looking desperate.

Posted by: lancelot113 | October 10, 2008 8:59 AM | Report abuse

Irony Does Reveal Truth This Article was published on Sept 11 a few hours before the attacks.


THE QUESTION IS OBAMA'S JUDGEMENT WHEN OBAMA WAS IN HIS 30s WHY DID OBAMA CHOOSE TO BE THIS PERSON'S FRIEND WHEN OBAMA WAS AN ADULT ??


IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH OBAMA WHEN HE WAS 8 YEARS OLD.


OBAMA HAS BEEN LYING ABOUT HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH AYERS - CLINTON WAS A LIAR TOO. (CONVICTED LIAR)


No Regrets for a Love Of Explosives; In a Memoir of Sorts, a War Protester Talks of Life With the Weathermen


By DINITIA SMITH
Published: September 11, 2001

''I don't regret setting bombs,'' Bill Ayers said. ''I feel we didn't do enough.'' Mr. Ayers, who spent the 1970's as a fugitive in the Weather Underground, was sitting in the kitchen of his big turn-of-the-19th-century stone house in the Hyde Park district of Chicago.

The long curly locks in his Wanted poster are shorn, though he wears earrings. He still has tattooed on his neck the rainbow-and-lightning Weathermen logo that appeared on letters taking responsibility for bombings. And he still has the ebullient, ingratiating manner, the apparently intense interest in other people, that made him a charismatic figure in the radical student movement.

Now he has written a book, ''Fugitive Days'' (Beacon Press, September). Mr. Ayers, who is 56, calls it a memoir, somewhat coyly perhaps, since he also says some of it is fiction.

He writes that he participated in the bombings of New York City Police Headquarters in 1970, of the Capitol building in 1971, the Pentagon in 1972. But Mr. Ayers also seems to want to have it both ways, taking responsibility for daring acts in his youth, then deflecting it.

''Is this, then, the truth?,'' he writes. ''Not exactly. Although it feels entirely honest to me.''
But why would someone want to read a memoir parts of which are admittedly not true? Mr. Ayers was asked.

''Obviously, the point is it's a reflection on memory,'' he answered. ''It's true as I remember it.''

Mr. Ayers is probably safe from prosecution anyway. A spokeswoman for the Justice Department said there was a five-year statute of limitations on Federal crimes except in cases of murder or when a person has been indicted.

Mr. Ayers, who in 1970 was said to have summed up the Weatherman philosophy as: ''Kill all the rich people. Break up their cars and apartments. Bring the revolution home, kill your parents, that's where it's really at,'' is today distinguished professor of education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. And he says he doesn't actually remember suggesting that rich people be killed or that people kill their parents, but ''it's been quoted so many times I'm beginning to think I did,'' he said. ''It was a joke about the distribution of wealth.''

He went underground in 1970, after his girlfriend, Diana Oughton, and two other people were killed when bombs they were making exploded in a Greenwich Village town house. With him in the Weather Underground was Bernardine Dohrn, who was put on the F.B.I.'s 10 Most Wanted List. J. Edgar Hoover called her ''the most dangerous woman in America'' and ''la Pasionara of the Lunatic Left.'' Mr. Ayers and Ms. Dohrn later married.

In his book Mr. Ayers describes the Weathermen descending into a ''whirlpool of violence.''

''Everything was absolutely ideal on the day I bombed the Pentagon,'' he writes. But then comes a disclaimer: ''Even though I didn't actually bomb the Pentagon -- we bombed it, in the sense that Weathermen organized it and claimed it.'' He goes on to provide details about the manufacture of the bomb and how a woman he calls Anna placed the bomb in a restroom. No one was killed or injured, though damage was extensive.

Between 1970 and 1974 the Weathermen took responsibility for 12 bombings, Mr. Ayers writes, and also helped spring Timothy Leary (sentenced on marijuana charges) from jail.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 10, 2008 8:48 AM | Report abuse

Irony Does Reveal Truth - this interview was published on Sept 11 a few hours before the attacks.


From the NY Times

No Regrets for a Love Of Explosives; In a Memoir of Sorts, a War Protester Talks of Life With the Weathermen

Top of Form


By DINITIA SMITH
Published: September 11, 2001

''I don't regret setting bombs,'' Bill Ayers said. ''I feel we didn't do enough.'' Mr. Ayers, who spent the 1970's as a fugitive in the Weather Underground, was sitting in the kitchen of his big turn-of-the-19th-century stone house in the Hyde Park district of Chicago.

The long curly locks in his Wanted poster are shorn, though he wears earrings. He still has tattooed on his neck the rainbow-and-lightning Weathermen logo that appeared on letters taking responsibility for bombings. And he still has the ebullient, ingratiating manner, the apparently intense interest in other people, that made him a charismatic figure in the radical student movement.

Now he has written a book, ''Fugitive Days'' (Beacon Press, September). Mr. Ayers, who is 56, calls it a memoir, somewhat coyly perhaps, since he also says some of it is fiction.

He writes that he participated in the bombings of New York City Police Headquarters in 1970, of the Capitol building in 1971, the Pentagon in 1972. But Mr. Ayers also seems to want to have it both ways, taking responsibility for daring acts in his youth, then deflecting it.

''Is this, then, the truth?,'' he writes. ''Not exactly. Although it feels entirely honest to me.''
But why would someone want to read a memoir parts of which are admittedly not true? Mr. Ayers was asked.

''Obviously, the point is it's a reflection on memory,'' he answered. ''It's true as I remember it.''

Mr. Ayers is probably safe from prosecution anyway. A spokeswoman for the Justice Department said there was a five-year statute of limitations on Federal crimes except in cases of murder or when a person has been indicted.

Mr. Ayers, who in 1970 was said to have summed up the Weatherman philosophy as: ''Kill all the rich people. Break up their cars and apartments. Bring the revolution home, kill your parents, that's where it's really at,'' is today distinguished professor of education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. And he says he doesn't actually remember suggesting that rich people be killed or that people kill their parents, but ''it's been quoted so many times I'm beginning to think I did,'' he said. ''It was a joke about the distribution of wealth.''

He went underground in 1970, after his girlfriend, Diana Oughton, and two other people were killed when bombs they were making exploded in a Greenwich Village town house. With him in the Weather Underground was Bernardine Dohrn, who was put on the F.B.I.'s 10 Most Wanted List. J. Edgar Hoover called her ''the most dangerous woman in America'' and ''la Pasionara of the Lunatic Left.'' Mr. Ayers and Ms. Dohrn later married.

In his book Mr. Ayers describes the Weathermen descending into a ''whirlpool of violence.''

''Everything was absolutely ideal on the day I bombed the Pentagon,'' he writes. But then comes a disclaimer: ''Even though I didn't actually bomb the Pentagon -- we bombed it, in the sense that Weathermen organized it and claimed it.'' He goes on to provide details about the manufacture of the bomb and how a woman he calls Anna placed the bomb in a restroom. No one was killed or injured, though damage was extensive.

Between 1970 and 1974 the Weathermen took responsibility for 12 bombings, Mr. Ayers writes, and also helped spring Timothy Leary (sentenced on marijuana charges) from jail.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 10, 2008 8:43 AM | Report abuse

I'm not a campaign stooge. I agree with Chris's assessments. Another day of global stock losses and it hasn't bottomed yet... This issue won't be resolved before Election Day and will remain issue #1 by far with voters. And this will definitely favor the Democrats on all levels. Democrats could run the table and deny Republicans any seats at the table for years to come.....

Posted by: RickJ | October 10, 2008 8:05 AM | Report abuse

Chris Clitizza labels some blog a respected non-partisan observer to back up his claims that the Dems will pick up 60 seats in November. Hey wait a minute, I thought the Washington Post was supposed to be a respected non-partisan observer. I guess that was amply demonstrated by the 8 negative McCain stories strewn throughout the paper yesterday. Not to mention that absolute fluff job on Obama's Illinois Legistlature experience. Also, Clitizza, how many times are you going the Rothenburg story on the 60 seats? You are simply not believable as a non-partisan observer of this election. The fix is definitely in.

Posted by: johburke | October 10, 2008 8:03 AM | Report abuse

Do Americans really want liberals to not only control the senate; but have a veto proof majority?

Especially when the house will also become more liberal as they increase their majority?

Then do they in addition want the most liberal senator to win the presidency?

Instead of "Drill baby, drill", we will hear "Tax baby, tax"!

Posted by: Xanadu3 | October 10, 2008 7:57 AM | Report abuse

.


.


The Solution to the Economic Crisis is NOT to place a former cocaine user like Obama in charge of the World's Largest Economy.


Are you completely insane?


Voted One Of The Nation's Top 5 Political Blogs For The Election Of 2008:


http://www.myspace.com/37thandostreet


Bookmark It Now !!!!


.


.
.


.


The Solution to the Economic Crisis is NOT to place a former cocaine user in charge of the World's Largest Economy.


Are you completely insane?


Voted One Of The Nation's Top 5 Political Blogs For The Election Of 2008:


http://www.myspace.com/37thandostreet


Bookmark It Now !!!!


.


.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 10, 2008 7:44 AM | Report abuse

Does anyone who is not a campaign stooge post here?

Posted by: Section506 | October 10, 2008 7:36 AM | Report abuse

I got it, Chris. No, you, 37andO alley, are. But please keep up the namecalling; O's gone up 3-4 pts. since the smears started last week and went ahead in West Virginia and is tied in GA.
______

"no one in their right mind is going to conclude that an inexperienced empty suit former cocainehead should lead the Largest Economy on Earth."


Are you completely insane?

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 10, 2008 7:17 AM

Posted by: broadwayjoe | October 10, 2008 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Screaming Ayers, Ayers, Ayers and inciting separatist crowds the past week have really been helpful -- not. Gallup, O up 11, DailyKos, O up 10. Zogby at 5 (up from 2 only days ago). Electoral map O with 278, no-toss-map at 360+. Georgia now in play. Yes, Georgia. Let's concentrate on the economy (Dow still plunging).

Posted by: broadwayjoe | October 10, 2008 7:27 AM | Report abuse

.


.


The Solution to the Economic Crisis is NOT to place a former cocaine user like Obama in charge of the World's Largest Economy.


Are you completely insane?


Voted One Of The Nation's Top 5 Political Blogs For The Election Of 2008:


http://www.myspace.com/37thandostreet


Bookmark It Now !!!!


.


.
.


.


The Solution to the Economic Crisis is NOT to place a former cocaine user in charge of the World's Largest Economy.


Are you completely insane?


Voted One Of The Nation's Top 5 Political Blogs For The Election Of 2008:


http://www.myspace.com/37thandostreet


Bookmark It Now !!!!


.


.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 10, 2008 7:24 AM | Report abuse

One point:


Obama is now running tv commercials saying that no one making under $250K will have their taxes raised under his plans.


So ALL THE MASSIVE PROGRAMS ON OBAMA'S WEBSITE are going to be paid for by higher taxes on those making over $250K ????


In this economy ???


Obama's entire economic - government program on his website IS COMPLETELY UNREALISTIC RIGHT NOW.

OBAMA IS MAROONED WITH A POST-RACIAL POST-PARTISAN MESSAGE THAT HE HAS COMMITTED FRAUD AGAINST - and now all the programs and high flying government programs on his website are completely out of touch with reality - His campaign has no oars and it will be taking on water really soon.


.


.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 10, 2008 7:22 AM | Report abuse

Chris:

Don't you think the American public is mature enough to blame the democrats as well as the Republicans for the economic crisis which is now hitting - deregulation was under Clinton and the democrats are knee-deep in this mess.

The media again is out there not telling the entire story.


Americans will think long and hard in the next few weeks and go for newcomers over incumbents - however both parties will be affected - and no one in their right mind is going to conclude that an inexperienced empty suit former cocainehead should lead the Largest Economy on Earth.

Are you completely insane?

.


.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 10, 2008 7:17 AM | Report abuse

if obama wins and if you own your own business and can get a loan, borrow your compensation for the next 5 years now because you know taxes will go up and up and up...dems are even considering removing the tax deference of 401k's...the dems are so ready to give your wealth to the rest of the world...

Posted by: DwightHCollins | October 10, 2008 7:17 AM | Report abuse

only America would reward the people who were behind this credit crisis by giving them more power...
if they get 60, the congress will pass comprehensive immigration reform, amnesty, the congress will raise taxes, over and over and over again...until taxation reaches a level of over 90% like it was pre kennedy...

Posted by: DwightHCollins | October 10, 2008 7:13 AM | Report abuse

Indeed it is possible that Democrats could run the table!

Who would rely on a Republican, at the rate they're going? Economy down the drain, Wall St crashing daily, racist hat-fuelled Nazi-like rallies conducted by McBush and Pitbull, Corporate fat cats getting fatter thanks to Republican backers who support tax loopholes and making the rich get richer...shall I go on???

The only thing really worth saying is that the Democrats better be grateful for Obama who is re-uniting people world over and doing wonders for his party. Isn't it fantastic to see such an inspirational person close to becoming the president?

VOTE OBAMA

Posted by: kbuckingham777 | October 10, 2008 6:57 AM | Report abuse

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