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Opportunity knocks in Senate races

Ask any successful politician the key to success and, if he/she is being honest, they will -- to a person -- say timing.

Timing is everything in politics. Picking the right race against the right challenger or incumbent in the right national environment and you drastically improve your chances of winning. Choose the wrong race and you could find your political career coming to an involuntary end.

In other words, you have to seize the moment in politics or run the risk of that moment being lost. (Just ask President Mario Cuomo.)

A number of aspiring pols have made a move to take advantage of favorable circumstances of late. Among them: Arkansas Lt. Gov. Bill Halter who announced this week that he is challenging Sen. Blanche Lincoln in the Democratic primary and former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson (R) appears to be moving toward challenging Sen. Russ Feingold (D).

Friday Line

(Others, of course, have declined bids lately including publishing magnate Mort Zuckerman in New York and Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota.)

For Republicans to have any margin for error in their longshot quest for the Senate majority this fall, they need Thompson as well as serious candidates in Washington State and against Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D) to take the opportunity this election cycle affords the party.

As always the number one ranked race is considered the most likely to switch parties in the fall.

To the Line!

Coming onto the Line: Indiana
Coming off the Line: Ohio

10. Missouri (Republican controlled): The Show Me State is famous in political circles for producing extremely close Senate races -- contests in 2000, 2002 and 2006 were all decided by very narrow margins -- and this year's race between Rep. Roy Blunt (R) and Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) is no exception. Democrats believe they can overcome a tough national environment by linking Blunt, who served in House Republican leadership, to the problems currently infecting the nation's capital. But, Carnahan will struggle to run as an outsider herself -- hailing from the the first family of Missouri Democratic politics. (Previous ranking: 7)

9. Pennsylvania (Democratic controlled): Democrats were buoyed by a new Quinnipiac poll that showed party switching Sen. Arlen Specter (D) leading former Rep. Pat Toomey (R). But, viewed broadly, polling still suggests Toomey holds a single-digit edge over the Democratic incumbent. And, even if Specter survives his May 18 primary fight against Rep. Joe Sestak -- no sure thing -- his long service in the Senate and acknowledgment that he switched parties because he didn't believe he could win as a Republican could ring false in this anti-Washington environment. (Previous ranking: 10)

8. Illinois(D): On paper, this is a seat Democrats should win. Illinois is a strongly Democratic state not to mention the home state of the sitting president of the United States. And yet, the race between state Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias and Rep. Mark Kirk (R) is close and Republicans are absolutely convinced that they can win the race. The reason for their optimism? Giannoulias' ongoing problems to explain the problems with his family-owned bank; he attempted to clear the air with the Chicago Tribune editorial board earlier this week but even Democrats acknowledge it didn't go nearly as well as they had hoped. (Previous ranking: 9)

7. New Hampshire (R): Conventional wisdom in the Republican primary race is that 1996 gubernatorial nominee Ovide Lamontagne presents the bigger challenge to former state Attorney General Kelly Ayotte who enjoys much of the establishment support in the race. But wealthy businessman Bill Binnie has already given his campaign more than $1 million and there is, apparently, much more where that came from. (Previous ranking: 5)

6. Colorado (D): It's not yet totally clear how serious former state House Speaker Andrew Romanoff's primary challenge to appointed Sen. Michael Bennet is. Romanoff's money has not been particularly stellar -- $630,000 raised to date -- but he is positioning himself as an outsider to Washington, a message that could work in a year like this one. Establishment Republicans like former Lt. Gov. Jane Norton but wealthy rancher Tom Wiens could complicate things in the primary for her. (Previous ranking: 6)

5. Indiana (D): Sen. Evan Bayh's surprise retirement last month took a safe (or close to it) Democratic seat and turned it into a tough hold for his party. Democrats made the best of a bad situation by recruiting Rep. Brad Ellsworth into the race and clearing the field for him. And, Republicans are headed for a primary with the likely winner -- former Sen. Dan Coats -- damaged from a Democratic assault on his lobbyist past. Still, Indiana is a Republican-leaning state in what is shaping up as a good Republican year. (Previous ranking: N/A)

4. Nevada (D): Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D) is in trouble -- and he isn't helping himself much. (Witness his comments on the Senate floor today.) The Republican race seems to have narrowed to three serious candidates: businessman Danny Tarkanian, former state party chairwoman Sue Lowden and wealthy financier John Chachas. None of the three are even close to a proven commodity in the state but Reid's numbers are bad enough that it may not matter. (Previous ranking: 3)

3. Arkansas (D): Halter's candidacy takes what is already a difficult race for the Lincoln and makes it that much tougher. The flood of money from liberal sources -- including organized labor -- suggest that Halter won't want for money -- and he is positioning himself to Lincoln's ideological left on health care (among other issues). The Republican field is jam-packed with state Sen. Gilbert Baker and Rep. John Boozman seen as the frontrunners. (Previous ranking: 4)

2. Delaware (D): Democrats think Newcastle County Executive Chris Coons (D) is a star in the making and that Rep. Mike Castle's (R) long tenure in elected office will work against him in this environment. Maybe. But Castle is a very popular politician in the state and Coons is an unknown. (Previous ranking: 2)

1. North Dakota (D): Former state Attorney General Heidi Heitkamp's decision earlier this week not to run takes Democrats' strongest potential nominee off the table. And it makes Gov. John Hoeven (R) an even more prohibitive favorite. (Previous ranking: 1)

By Chris Cillizza  |  March 5, 2010; 1:28 PM ET
Categories:  The Line  
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Next: Eric Massa to resign from Congress

Comments

WHY ARIZONA'S CONGRESSIONAL REP G. GIFFORDS WILL LOSE HER SEAT.

CONGRESSIONAL REP. G. GIFFORDS
6 March 2010
VOTE NO!

I would like to believe my Congressional Representative is a person of integrity whose word is their bond.
VOTE NO!

You promised at your Town Hall Meeting in Tucson that you would NOT vote for any Health Care bill that did not contain the mechanism for financing the costs within the bill. The current bill does not do this.

Costs not covered in the bill include:
1. Deficit spending over the life of the bill per the Congressional Budget Office in the trillions (even with the subterfuge of collecting the taxes for first 10 years versus spending for 6),
2. Unfunded mandates foisted off on the states in the trillions and
3. Unfunded items pulled out of the bill with the intent of including them in separate bills later.

The above is in the face of the historical facts that Congressional cost estimates on ALL Health Bills have been GROSSLY UNDER ESTIMATED.

On top of this we are faced with trillions in deficit SPENDING in Congress's so called stimulus bills which have created NO net new jobs. Until our fellow citizens (20% of which are unemployed or under-employed) are back at work, Congress has no business adding the mountain of debt in this bill to the Unfunded Social Security Benefits, Unfunded Medicare Benefits, Unfunded Veterans Benefits and the National Debt which already total + or - $100 trillion dollars on the US households ONLY HALF OF WHICH PAY FEDERAL TAXES.

PS: Raising Federal salaries and benefits including Congress's in such an environment is OBSCENE

Posted by: PRRWRITER | March 6, 2010 2:16 PM | Report abuse

KAP2, this boils down to the same argument the Texans were having yesterday.
Like I said, the Olympia to Everett, Bellingham really, corridor is where the WA voting population is growing fastest.

Sure, Rossi still polls well where fewer people live, we agree on that. But won't the TEA people want their own candidate? Rossi runs as an outsider, but he sure has made a career out of trying to get elected.

Posted by: shrink2 | March 6, 2010 8:20 AM | Report abuse

Rossi does have a chance (if he runs). Gregoire just beat barely beat him in 2004 (with questionable voting in King County)and again in 2008. Get out of the Everett to Olympia area and he polls big. With the anti DC feelings he could win big.

Posted by: KAP2 | March 6, 2010 1:54 AM | Report abuse

kenpasadena


Very good point

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 6, 2010 1:02 AM | Report abuse

mts2


What I'm talking about is this: since Massa is not running for re-election, he has no fear of defeat in November, so Pelosi has a chance to convince him to vote for health care.

Which is how they are getting votes now - Pelosi is trying to convince House democrats that their re-election is a lost cause, so they should have no fear.

Clearly, this is a sign that they may have quit the health care push.


I understand the logic may be a little out-there, but it is right on target.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 6, 2010 12:52 AM | Report abuse

37thand0street: what are you talking about. Massa voted AGAINST HCR. By his resigning, Pelosi needs 216, not 217. So it's a win for her.

Posted by: mts2 | March 5, 2010 9:21 PM | Report abuse

The best outcome for the Republicans might be a 50-50 split in the Senate and a House that is just shy of a majority. Even more gridlock would reign. That would keep the Democrats in control, ready to be blamed with Obama before they all get fired by the voters in 2012. If only it were already 2012. I don't know if the country can take two more years of this bunch.

Posted by: kenpasadena | March 5, 2010 8:18 PM | Report abuse

These rankings provided by CC are very accurate.

If/when Tommy Thompson declares against Russ Feingold in Wisconsin, this race should slot into number seven on the current rankings. That would make 9 out of 10 seats in play held by democrats. By the end of the cycle, it will be 10 out of 10. I smell a new majority...

Posted by: Gatecrasher | March 5, 2010 7:56 PM | Report abuse

I'm curious about that NY condo that Jake has available.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | March 5, 2010 6:36 PM | Report abuse

Anyone else?

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 6:33 PM | Report abuse

Three sputtering posts trying to weasel out if something nobody cares about anyway.

Ad *adult* would just say "I decided to come back," but Jake us too insecure for that. And too immature.

Posted by: Noacoler | March 5, 2010 6:19 PM | Report abuse

I took a break starting October 19th. You can check every thread starting here:

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/thefix/2009/10/18-week/

I came back full time on December 4th ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 6:09 PM | Report abuse

NOW Obama wants to legalize all the illegal aliens.

WAY TO PICK POPULAR ISSUES !!!

What's next? Releasing Terrorists ? Oh, Obama is doing that already.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 5, 2010 5:38 PM | Report abuse

I did say that I was taking an extended break from here late last year (look up the threads after October 19th if you don't believe me). Someone tried to make a "point" that the only ones leaving The Fix were those upset with posts from the conservatives, and that no one ever left because of posts by those on the liberal side. My October 19th post simply clarified that I was taking an extended break because of those on the liberal side (and to travel during the holidays ; )

If anyone else has a question about that, please let me know.

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 5:29 PM | Report abuse

One NY lease?

Posted by: JakeD3 | March 5, 2010 5:15 PM | Report abuse

What I meant to say is that I couldn't stay with any blog that would accept my comments.

Posted by: JakeD3 | March 5, 2010 5:13 PM | Report abuse

koolkat_1960:

You mean that "Noacoler" is a freak for monitoring posts too? LOL!!!

If anyone else wants to know what my October 19, 2009 4:25 PM post was about, let me know.

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 5:07 PM | Report abuse

"koolkat_1960:

An "occasional post"?! So promised that you were DONE with The Fix forever!!!

(and I'm the "liar" yeah right ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 4:08 PM | Report abuse"

Only a sick freak would monitor posts to the degree you and the other rightwingnut fruitcake nutbars do.

Now I'm not sure who the bigger freak is, you or Ace McNumbnuts.

Posted by: koolkat_1960 | March 5, 2010 5:02 PM | Report abuse

If Pelosi and Hoyer pushed Massa to leave now, instead of a month from now, they are giving up a vote on health care.

So WHY would they do that???


It makes no sense. EXCEPT if they have already made the leap to election mode - and decided that the public perception of the House democrats for November IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN THE HEALTH CARE VOTE.


This could be a signal that Pelosi, Hoyer and the House democrats are throwing in the towel on the health care vote.


Could it be over?


.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 5, 2010 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Ped, wasn't this the year you were going to get a life?

Maybe next year.

Posted by: drivl | March 5, 2010 4:47 PM | Report abuse

I am leaving this place because of "drindl" and "GoldAndTanzanite" (who admitted to being banned as "chrisfox8" yet still returns and posts crap all the time).

Posted by: JakeD | October 19, 2009 4:25 PM | Report abuse

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/thefix/most-important-number/the-most-important-number-in-p-51.html
 
lying as usual

Posted by: Noacoler | March 5, 2010 4:43 PM | Report abuse

they were expecting an uproar begging them to stay perhaps?

I honestly don't think they could recognize themselves in the mirror.

why is it the three worst cases all act the same pre-teen age girl same.

Now I'm leaving!!!!

Unless you don't want me to.

OK. I'll stay.

Posted by: drivl | March 5, 2010 4:28 PM | Report abuse

I never said that I was leaving too.

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

You said you were leaving too, Jake.

How old are you? Seven? Eight? Think anyone wants to read you juvenile goads? Go suck a tailpipe, infant.

Posted by: Noacoler | March 5, 2010 4:18 PM | Report abuse

Sadly, drindl "promised" to leave too but didn't keep that promise either:

"I AM LEAVING AND NOT COMING BACK UNTIL YOU GET RID OF THIS CRAP [re: zouk and me]. I URGE THE REST OF YOU TO DO THE SAME.

Let's see how Chris feels with nothing left but parrot posts by trolls."

Posted by: drindl | August 18, 2009 11:57 AM

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/thefix/fix-notes/a-comment-on-comments-part-two.html

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 4:14 PM | Report abuse

koolkat_1960:

An "occasional post"?! So promised that you were DONE with The Fix forever!!!

(and I'm the "liar" yeah right ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 4:08 PM | Report abuse

Lookit, I should have said the conservatives in WA that live, in general, farther from I5 than closer to it, have for many years had no voice on the national scene, not since the days of Skeletor and Scoop and that (2) Dino Rossi is not going to change that because (3) the demographics are going the wrong way.
 
==
 
And with Hanford more and more out of the nuclear war business the real driving force for eastern Washington troglodytism is drying up.  
 
I lived in Tricities when the closures started .. some of the letters to the editor were hair-curling, people who were as gnashing of teeth about nuclear winter as the gomers are these days about global warming.  What could possibly be wrong with a good ol’ nuclear conflagration?  Who but an anti-American liberal would object to mushroom clouds?  DID YOU KNOW THE SOVIETS HAVE SEVENTEEN PROCESSING PLANTS?!??!! (sic)
 
Conservative sickos aren’t new.

Posted by: Noacoler | March 5, 2010 4:04 PM | Report abuse

LOL I'm definitely out of practice.

Posted by: koolkat_1960 | March 5, 2010 4:03 PM | Report abuse

JokeD: I'm down to the occasional post. The Fix has been destroyed but wingnuts, trolls, and no-life fruitcakes.

Posted by: koolkat_1960 | March 5, 2010 4:01 PM | Report abuse

I thought that you weren't going to post here anymore?

==

guess you were wrong again, snarklord

Posted by: Noacoler | March 5, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

Ewww Brock Adams, lets not get on down the road to Bob Packwood.

Lookit, I should have said the conservatives in WA that live, in general, farther from I5 than closer to it, have for many years had no voice on the national scene, not since the days of Skeletor and Scoop and that (2) Dino Rossi is not going to change that because (3) the demographics are going the wrong way.

Posted by: shrink2 | March 5, 2010 3:57 PM | Report abuse

In the Wisconsin senate race there are at least five good reasons why Tommy Thompson won't run:
1 he hates Washington;
2 he's used to running things as an executive (HHS, the State)and is contemptuous of legislatures;
3. he's not a good back bencher and he revels in the limelight;
4. he's finally making money; and finally, 5. his wife wants him out of politics permanently.

Posted by: al11235 | March 5, 2010 3:55 PM | Report abuse

While George Wallace was a Democrat as Governor of Alabama, he ran for President in the 1968 election as the American Independent Party candidate.

==

relevance? Zero.

Your American Insignificant Party can't get enough voted *nationally* to elect a small-town insurance commissioner. "I voted for Alan Keys" *titter titter titter*

gosh you're sooooooo cooooool

Posted by: Noacoler | March 5, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

koolkat_1960:

I thought that you weren't going to post here anymore?

scrivener50:

Watch out, because I just got called about a "cell phones and the government" poll (on my cell phone ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Wasn't your original "point" that WA Rs (I assume that meant "Republicans) have had no voice on the national scene ever since they lost DEMOCRAT "Scoop" Jackson?

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 3:51 PM | Report abuse

Wasnt Scoop Jackson a democrat ?

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 5, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

Nice day on Wall Street. Across the country, hard-working Americans' 401k accounts and IRAs continue to recover from the devastation caused by the George W. Bush Administration.

Posted by: koolkat_1960 | March 5, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Anyone who thinks Dino Rossi could get elected as a hotel doorman is either completely ignorant if Washington politics or a complete idiot. Rossi is a synonym for loser around here. Nobody likes him but the same defiant jerkoffs who got Pat Robertson as the GOP nominee instead of Bush the Greater.

Posted by: Noacoler | March 5, 2010 3:48 PM | Report abuse

While George Wallace was a Democrat as Governor of Alabama, he ran for President in the 1968 election as the American Independent Party candidate.

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 3:45 PM | Report abuse

No way the Repubs win in NY (unless Pataki runs, which does not seem likely), CA (very weak GOP field), or WA (again weak GOP field). If th economu stays as is, then I beleive GOP will win NV, ND, Ar (if Lincoln wins the primary), DE..although I'm not sold on DE, NH (only if Ayotte wins), FL (if Crist wins). Dems hold on to PA, IL, and take MO.

If the economy turns...the Dems could add.

Posted by: jjj141 | March 5, 2010 3:45 PM | Report abuse

Wash. voters did sack speaker of the house tom foley in '94. and let's not forget the esteemed brock adams that Wash. sent to the senate in 1986.

Posted by: von_wallenstein | March 5, 2010 3:38 PM | Report abuse

True but so was George Wallace and so were many others from the acien era of profoundly conservative Democrats. Scoop was one of the cold warrior inspirations for neo cons like Wolfowitz and Perle. This isn't just about party lines.

Posted by: shrink2 | March 5, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

umm, scoop jackson was a democrat

Posted by: von_wallenstein | March 5, 2010 3:25 PM | Report abuse

latest rasmussen poll (mar. 2nd) only polled the general. had blumenthal leading simmons 58-32 and mcmahon 60-31. blumenthal has a 72% favorability rating. hard to see him losing.

i think GOP takes N.D., Del., Ark., Nev. and Pa. (+5) and three/four of N.H., Colo., Mo., Wis., Ill. and Ind. (net gain 1-2), for an overall gain of 6-7 seats.

if the economy really stays in the tank, or credible challengers appear, Cal., N.Y. (only pataki can win) and Wash. are in play

Posted by: von_wallenstein | March 5, 2010 3:21 PM | Report abuse

At this point, it looks good that the Republicans will take control the House - in 2012 the rotation is much better for the Republicans to take control the Senate.

Some may say it is too early to talk about 2012.


However, the rotation of Senate elections for 2012 can not be mistaken.

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 5, 2010 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Of course.

But that deep blue I-5 corridor is the part of WA that just keeps on growing...it drives the state's periphery nuts. Ever since they lost "Skeletor" Slade Gorton and before him of course "Scoop" Jackson, the WA Rs have had no voice on the national scene.

But sure, The WA House Rs did great in 1994.

Here is an piece, a little old, but it is balanced and nothing has changed in the last month.

http://www.theolympian.com/2010/01/31/1121342/gop-craves-1994-repeat.html

Posted by: shrink2 | March 5, 2010 3:16 PM | Report abuse

What a great day in America. Only 36,000 people lost their jobs! (Sen Harry Reid - D - NV - he said it - not me )

The truer measure of unemployment in the United States rose from 16.5 percent in January to 16.8 percent in February.

Another, really - really bad day for the DEMOCRUDS.

Posted by: stephenwhelton | March 5, 2010 3:11 PM | Report abuse

Never say never.

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 3:05 PM | Report abuse

Sorry fellas, Washington's Patty Murray (D) is safe. Dino has until June to try again, but it is getting awfully late to re-fire his tuckered out political machine. There are no other serious candidates.

Further, most of the anti-Murray heat is coming from the crazy people, like the ones we see here. Recently, in a widely publicized episode a TEA person called for Murray to be hung. This is really not the way to attract voters.

Posted by: shrink2 | March 5, 2010 3:02 PM | Report abuse

Excuse me, you are correct (I thought that Sen. Byrd was up for re-election this year ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 2:54 PM | Report abuse

JakeD, I'm a Republican but some of the comments you make are just dumb. No way, I don't believe, will Republicans win West Virginia in 2010...Byrd nor Rockerfeller is even up for reelection in 2010. How will R's win? If one of em dies, the gov. is a Democrat. I don't know where you get that idea? I think we will win Cali and may Washington, if we get a great candidate there. New York is more doubtful than Cali. or Washington, but if we got Pataki in we could win.

Posted by: reason5 | March 5, 2010 2:47 PM | Report abuse

JakeD, I'm a Republican but some of the comments you make are just dumb. No way, I don't believe, will Republicans win West Virginia in 2010...Byrd nor Rockerfeller is even up for reelection in 2010. How will R's win? If one of em dies, the gov. is a Democrat. I don't know where you get that idea? I think we will win Cali and may Washington, if we get a great candidate there. New York is more doubtful than Cali. or Washington, but if we got Pataki in we could win.

Posted by: reason5 | March 5, 2010 2:47 PM | Report abuse

As long as people are being crazy stupid.
Demas will take Idaho, Nebraska and Wyoming.

Posted by: dganderson13 | March 5, 2010 2:43 PM | Report abuse

My top 10 list:
1. North Dakota
2. Delaware
3. Arkansas
4. Indiana
5. Colorodo
6. Nevada
7. Illinois
8. California
9. New Hampshire
10. Pennsylvania

Other competitive: Missouri and Ohio, although Ohio seemingly becomes less competitive daily as it increasingly looks like Robert Portman will be the new US Senator from Ohio.

Other could be competitive: Wisconsin as Tommy Thompson runs, as I think he will and will likely win. Washington if Dino Rossi runs, as is likely in my book. New York if former Gov. George Pataki runs, as is still doubtful at this point. Cornyn will really have to sell that one to Pataki. In Conn., that one increasingly looks like Blumenthal will be the new US Senator of Conn. Although, if McMahon beats out Simmons and in the R primary, she has a whole lot of money to define Blumenthal in a different light in the GE. If Simmons win the R primary, Blumenthal will walk into the US Senate. Time will tell with this one, but I suspect McMahon wins the R primary with all of her money and the GE will likely be more competitive than it appears now. Time will tell in Conn. By the way, does anyone know of any polls in the Conn. R primary. That's one to watch with McMahon vs. Simmons.

Posted by: reason5 | March 5, 2010 2:43 PM | Report abuse

What people have to realize is that Obama's presidential campaign was a FRAUD.

Obama promised things to the American People that he KNEW HE COULD NOT DELIVER.

The complete lack of effort, the complete lack of even attempting to deliver what Obama promised, has actually been astonishing.

The democrats ACT like none of this ever happened - that somehow they are entitled to the majorities they got by FRAUD - and somehow these majorities are going to last forever.

When will all this sink in ???

.

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 5, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Republicans always think Feingold is ripe to be knocked off. While he is far more liberal than the state, he is unique and Wisconsin voters like that. There is no doubt that this is the year to challenge an incumbent, and it I'm sure the Democrats would prefer Kohl to be running for reelection but here are a couple of reasons Tommy is not a sure thing.

1. Wisconsin has an open governors race. Most of the electorate is going to wonder why he wants to replace Feingold when we desperately need a competent governor.

2. Tommy Thompson, when compared to the Republican party, much less the Tea Party, is a flaming liberal. Why is it the job of the Wisconsin voter to give Snowe and Collins a third friend?

3. The Fix always claims the voters need a reason to fire an incumbent. He is supposed to be a libertarian (he voted against the Patriot Act) and the liberal conscience of the Senate. What exactly has he failed at? No one expects his vision to succeed, they just want it voiced every once in a while.

4. See 1 above, I think Feingold could easily attack Thompson's motives and claim it is the National Republicans who are running Thompson for National Republican reasons. That Thompson is not running to represent Wisconsin. That he is running to help the National Republicans, who aren't very popular.

If Tommy wanted his old job as governor back, I'd vote for him in a heartbeat. But I see no reason to replace one of the only guys in the Senate to oppose the Patriot Act, again and again and again.

Posted by: caribis | March 5, 2010 2:33 PM | Report abuse

Specter is toast in Pa. It's inexplicable why the Dems would nominate him over Sestak. Specter's unfavorability rating is in the mid-40s, not far from 50%+, which is usually fatal for an incumbent

Posted by: von_wallenstein | March 5, 2010 2:32 PM | Report abuse

Washington State and Wisconsin will switch parties this year too. The dissatisfaction with Obama around the country is widespread and deep. It seems like there is no one in the country that doesn't have an opinion.


I can't remember a time when the electorate was so politicized.

No one will be happy until Obama is voted out. What is amazing is that Obama has had so little experience in Washington - he doesn't think ahead. Surely next year Obama is going to have to work with the Republicans.


If Obama is going to have to work with the Republicans next year, his actions this year surely do not reflect that.

What a disaster.


..

Posted by: 37thand0street | March 5, 2010 2:26 PM | Report abuse

shrink2:

I said "maybe".

doof:

If the choice is a 50-50 tie (with Biden as VP) and 51-49 GOP majority (with McCain getting re-elected), I will gladly take the majority ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 2:13 PM | Report abuse

arlen sphincter will lose pennsylvania. take mccain with him.

Posted by: doof | March 5, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

"maybe even Washington"

Hah! Who will the R candidate be, the recidivistic loser Dino Rossi?

Stick to what you know.

Posted by: shrink2 | March 5, 2010 1:57 PM | Report abuse

I'm going to do my best in Connecticut too, but that's admittedly a long shot.

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 1:50 PM | Report abuse

wow, the top six are pretty sure Repub takeovers.

anyone surprised? the obvious result of the triumverate of fools.

Posted by: drivl | March 5, 2010 1:49 PM | Report abuse

The Dems are going to lose California and New York (maybe even Washington and West Virginia ; )

Posted by: JakeD2 | March 5, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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