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The Friday Primary Line: Game off in CA (or not)



San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, California Sen. Dianne Feinstein and state Attorney General Jerry Brown. AP Photos

The recent decision by San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom to drop his candidacy for governor of California left only state Attorney General Jerry Brown in the race for the Democratic nod, knocking one of the Fix's top 10 primaries off of our Line.

But Brown's primary primacy was short-lived as a story in Thursday's San Jose Mercury News said that California Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D) was still mulling a run for governor and would make a decision in early 2010 based on how the candidates currently in the race propose to deal with the state's budget crisis.

Feinstein's waiting-and-watching approach is a sea change from the widely-held expectation in Democratic political circles that she had long ago decided against the race, preferring to stay in Washington and retain her post as chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Polling has long suggested that if DiFi ran for governor, she would be a wide favorite in both the primary and general election against the likes of former eBay Ceo Meg Whitman, state Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner or former Rep. Tom Campbell -- all of whom are seeking the Republican nod.

It seems amazing to us that Brown, who first served as governor of the Golden State in 1974, would get a free pass in the primary -- particularly when one considers that California's Democratic tendencies make whoever becomes that party's nominee a clear favorite next fall.

The no-go decisions by Newsom and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa earlier this year may well have re-opened the door for a Feinstein candidacy. If she runs and if Brown stays in the race, the California Democratic gubernatorial primary won't be off the Line for long.

The number one ranked race on the Line is the race we believe represents the best intraparty contest in the country. (For more on what makes a great primary, check our last primary Line.)

As always, your own thoughts are welcome in the comments section below.

To the Line!

10. Arizona Senate (Republican primary): Sen. John McCain isn't going to lose this primary to Chris Simcox, one of the founders of the anti-immigration Minuteman Civil Defense Corps. McCain ended September with more than $5 million in the bank while Simcox showed less than $10,000 in the bank. Why does this race make the Line then? Because Simcox will almost certainly benefit from the anger among the conservative base of the GOP, a group that has never liked McCain -- even when he was the party's presidential nominee last November. If Simcox can get 40 percent of the vote (or higher) -- unlikely but not impossible -- it would do two things: remind people of the power of the most conservative element of the GOP and embarrass McCain. (Previous ranking: N/A)

9. Michigan Governor (R): The GOP primary in the Wolverine State is a rare instance where there are four credible candidates in the field, each of whom can make a legitimate case for why the can win. The race appears to be three-tiered at the moment: state Attorney General Mike Cox and Rep. Pete Hoesktra are in tier one, Oakland County Sheriff Mike Bouchard is in tier two and wealthy businessman Rick Snyder occupies tier three. Snyder's personal money -- and how willing he is to spend it -- are the x-factors in the primary fight. With the state's economy struggling badly and the likely Democratic nominee -- Lt. Gov. John Cherry -- inspiring little confidence even within his own party, this looks like a terrific opportunity for whoever winds up as the Republican nominee. (Previous ranking: 10)

8. Kentucky Senate (R): Businessman Rand Paul's $1 million third quarter shows that the powerful Internet-based fundraising operation built by his father in the 2008 presidential campaign remains decidedly robust. And, the dynamic in the race -- Paul as outsider, Secretary of State Trey Grayson as party insider -- is sure to appeal to those conservative ideologues looking to re-create NY-23. (Worth noting: Grayson is not New York state Assemblywoman Dede Scozzafava; he is a down-the-line conservative.) One other element of the race to keep an eye on: there is, according to smart Bluegrass operatives, growing dissatisfaction among grassroots GOP activists in the state with the political godfather role that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R) has taken on over the years. Grayson is a McConnell protege and could become the focus of anti-McConnell sentiment in the party. (Previous ranking: N/A)

7. Illinois Senate (Democratic primary): The race to fill the seat vacated by President Barack Obama has been filled with a series of twists and turns -- exactly what one would expect from a Democratic primary fight in Illinois. State Treasurer Lexi Giannoulias has been in the race for the better part of the last year and remains the frontrunner. But, former Chicago Inspector General David Hoffman opened some eyes with his fundraising in the third quarter (nearly $900,000 raised including a $500,000 personal loan) and a poll conducted by Geoff Garin that showed the race very much up in the air. Giannoulias has countered with poll data of his own that shows him leading likely GOP nominee Mark Kirk and Hoffman falling short against Kirk. Add into the mix Chicago Urban League CEO Cheryle Jackson and you have a surprisingly intriguing primary in the works. (Previous ranking: N/A)

6. Nevada Senate (R): A former casino owner, the son of a legendary basketball coach, a controversial former state legislator and a wealthy banker walk into a primary....Not only is the backdrop of this race the always-interesting state of Nevada but whoever wins the GOP nod will immediately become a national figure as the man (or woman) tasked with trying to knock off Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. The co-frontrunners for the nod at the moment seem to be Sue Lowden (the casino owner and former chairwoman of the state party) and Danny Tarkanian (the son of longtime UNLV hoops coach Jerry Tarkanian). (Previous ranking: N/A)

5. California Governor (R): The Democratic race for the top spot in California may have dropped off of the political radar (for the moment) but the GOP contest still has all the makings of a classic contest. Whitman has weathered her first major crisis of the campaign -- a series of stories that showcased her poor voting record -- and seems to have stabilized. Poizner continues to hit Whitman every chance he gets while Campbell seems content to stay above (or below?) the fray. The central question of the race: Which of the trio will become the preferred pick of social conservatives in the state (yes, there still are some in California)? (Previous ranking: 3)

4. Connecticut Senate (R): Give former World Wrestling Entertainment CEO Linda McMahon this: she has made the Republican race for the chance to take on Sen. Chris Dodd (D) a heck of a lot more interesting. McMahon has already spent millions on television introducing herself to the state's voters and she has certainly gotten the attention of former Rep. Rob Simmons, the favorite for the nod. McMahon has -- predictably -- had to endure several negative stories about her ties to the wrestling operation but she has vaulted herself into "serious candidate" status in relatively short order. (Previous ranking: 4)

3. Florida Senate (R): Three months ago, former state House Speaker Marco Rubio was fending off daily rumors that he was planning to drop his Senate primary bid against Gov. Charlie Crist. Today, all the momentum is on Rubio's side thanks to the conservative uprising in NY-23 and Crist's poorly-executed attempt to walk away from his past support for the Obama Administration's economic stimulus package. The events of the past month or so have virtually ensured that this will be the marquee race in the ongoing debate within the GOP about its future direction. And that's not good news for Crist. (Previous ranking: N/A)

2. Pennsylvania Senate (D): The race between party-switching Sen. Arlen Specter and Rep. Joe Sestak has been relatively quiet of late but knowing the two combatants that won't last long. Polling suggests that Democratic voters still have real doubts about Specter -- most party switchers struggle with this wolf-in-sheep's-clothing phenomenon -- and that his best path to the nomination is to turn the race into a "devil you know" choice. Sestak, however, won't go quietly and has enough money -- $4.7 million in the bank at the end of September -- to ensure that Democratic primary voters hear his side of the story. (Previous ranking: 2)

1. Texas Governor (R): The intensity of the primary fight between Gov. Rick Perry and Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison rivals that of a presidential race. On a daily basis each side peppers the Fix inbox with e-mails detailing the race-changing mistake made by the rival campaign. It's all a little bit much -- especially when considering that the primary isn't until March 2, 2010. Everything is bigger in Texas, however, and this race is no exception; it has the potential to go down as one of the truly legendary intraparty squabbles in modern political history. (Previous ranking: 1)

By Chris Cillizza  |  November 6, 2009; 4:25 PM ET
Categories:  The Line  
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Next: The most important number in politics this weekend

Comments

I am glad to see this. Sestek vs. Specter & Crist vs. Rubio. Both party primaries say something about how the party is moving. Will they go moderate or will they stick to their roots? If they go moderate, Specter & Crist will move on to the GE. If they stick to their roots, Rubio & Sestek will pull upsets. I think that Specter is in fairly decent shape being that Obama, Rendell & the whole D establishment is lined up behind Specter. Sestek has a pretty tough row to hoe. On the other hand in Florida, Crist is the front-runner. He has tons of cash to spend & defend himself as well as fairly high popularity as governor of Florida. His negatives can be exploited among Conservatives, however. I think the Club for Growth & the Jeb Bush folks will help Rubio raise cash & make this a real contest. A great primary. The other few on this list that I think will be competitive to the end is California (R), Michigan (R) & Conn. (R). These races will be tough. California has 2 very rich people: Meg Whitman & Steve Poizner going at it tooth & nail. Campbell is in the background, but with his history of public service seems to have a way to stay in this race. I think the social conservatives, as he has already gotten some support from, will go to Poizner. If this happens and he runs on conservative support and as a social moderate, he may be the front-runner, even over Whitman. In Michigan, if Snyder is willing to spend his own money on this primary, can take advantage of his ties with the business community & even run a few good ads with him and Fords, taking advantage of their endorsement, has a great shot to win it. I think he can be a tier 1 candidate with Cox & Hoekstra. Cox will not go away as he is a proven vote getter as he won AG races in 2002 & 2006. Hoekstra has deep ties to Washington DC, which I think will ultimately hurt him in the long run, especially if Snyder runs as the ultimate outsider. In Conn., Simmons is in to stay but McMahon is running strong already putting ads up in the expensive NYC media markets. Foley will not go away, with his foreign relations experience as an ambassador to Ireland & his business credentials, he will be a force. He will also likely get the socially conservative votes. Caliguri may as well bow out, as he is a staunch supporter of unions & the field isn't big enough for 2 economic moderates: Caliguri & Simmons. 2 fiscal Conservatives: Foley & McMahon. 2 social moderates: McMahon & Simmons. 2 social conservatives: Foley & Caliguri. 1 foreign relations moderates: Simmons. There is big money in the McMahon & Foley camps. Caliguri may as well drop the race now.

Texas is in a whole new category: Gov. Perry vs. US Senator Hutchinson. Gov. Perry appears to have all of the conservative momentum on his side. I can not go against Perry in this race and I have to say he's the slight favorite here, but it will be a great primary & a very nasty race.

Posted by: reason5 | November 10, 2009 11:32 AM | Report abuse

margaretmeyers writes
"I cannot imagine that at 76 Diane Feinstein would leave her well-trod path in the Senate to take on a job as huge as governing California through its current financial crisis. That's not work for an 80 year-old."


Jerry Brown is also on the elderly side, at 71. Amazing that the Dem bench in CA consists of either barely-old-enough-for-a-beer Gavin Newsome, or a couple septuagenarians.

.

Posted by: bsimon1 | November 9, 2009 3:32 PM | Report abuse

@DDAWD - Working as a physicist, I've a number of Indian colleagues and friends and so have an entirely different experience from G&T.

==

I wasn't talking about the entire culture, I was talking about recent arrivals back in the late 80s. I'm assuming that MS added a hygiene session to their new employee orientation because other than a few spectacular exceptions the problem was largely gone by 1991.

If I had any problem with Indians then wow am I in the wrong field ...

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 9, 2009 2:22 PM | Report abuse

@DDAWD - Working as a physicist, I've a number of Indian colleagues and friends and so have an entirely different experience from G&T. I'm a little bitter about a missed chance to visit India a couple of years ago. I had an invited talk at a conference in Mumbai. I wasn't allowed to attend the conference. Grrrr...

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | November 8, 2009 11:42 PM | Report abuse

I cannot imagine that at 76 Diane Feinstein would leave her well-trod path in the Senate to take on a job as huge as governing California through its current financial crisis. That's not work for an 80 year-old. Men often think they've still got it long after they lost it. Thurmond and a raft load of male Senators in their 80s and 90s attest to that. Look for Feinstein to enjoy 4 years of Victory Lap under a Democratic majority and then Bow Out.

The X chromosome is smarter about this, but I think it's also that the women Senators don't attract the power structure that keeps them there in the Senate -- the way Thurmond's group walked him to the floor, reminded him how to vote, and then walked him back to his office was wrong.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | November 8, 2009 10:31 AM | Report abuse

You gotta wonder what sort of thuggish threats and hopes for graft mr transparency deployed behind closed doors to wrangle the last three wayward lemmings. This monstrosity barely squeeks by with even 40 dems jumping ship. It is now headed to certain defeat under the leadership in the senate of marshmellow spine. What a party of losers. Is anyone unclear that they can't govern and Barry is inept?

Posted by: snowbama | November 8, 2009 8:44 AM | Report abuse

Given the enormous pay off to Rand Paul of his father's quixotic presidential run - a massive internet fund-raising base - I can't help wondering if this was Ron Paul's plan all along. He cannot have believed he had a chance at the GOP nomination, after all.

Posted by: qlangley | November 8, 2009 4:53 AM | Report abuse

FORT HOOD MASSACRE: ECHOES OF 9-11? GULF OF TONKIN?

http://nowpublic.com/world/ft-hood-massacre-echoes-9-11-gulf-tonkin

Posted by: scrivener50 | November 8, 2009 3:11 AM | Report abuse

BB, not sure what the deal is between G+T and Indians, but its a beautiful country and in the tourist areas, it's pretty hospitable to tourists and foreigners. You can find tours through Rajistan where you'll see the Taj Mahal as well as a lot of incredible forts and palaces and temples. They are just incredible sights.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 8, 2009 12:35 AM | Report abuse

Healthcare passes in the house. Let's hope the abortion compromises are removed before final passage.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 7, 2009 11:18 PM | Report abuse

The ranting loony pinko has usurped the blog again. Treating us to an overflowing thimble of wisdom.

What a loser. Get a life.

Posted by: snowbama | November 7, 2009 10:58 PM | Report abuse

I honestly don't know what Pakastani food is like, though there used to be a terrific Afghani place called Caravan Serai in St. Paul, MN. I included Pakastanis as most of the curry houses in Sheffield, England, were run by Pakistanis. I'd love to visit any of these countries some day, though India seems most likely due to the security situation.

==

India and Israel are the two countries in the world I want least to ever set foot in.

Israel I don't need to go into.

India has a great collection of cuisines and some very polite and hospitable people. But it also has many at the other end of the comportment spectrum, condescending braggarts, and while they could be avoided there remains my primary reason: I remember working with recently arrived Indians at Microsoft whose BO was so bad you couldn't breathe anywhere in the same hallway. Not just "overdue for a shower" but execrable eye-watering stench. I don't even want to imagine what it's like in the country but I've talked to many who went there and confirmed that it's pretty damned bad.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 7, 2009 10:39 PM | Report abuse

As for socially conservative...Rand is solidly anti-abortion, pro-second amendment (those are big planks for me).

==

Are you a lactating woman? No? A recent parent? No? Then why do you care about abortion?

I've been arguing this stuff for forty years and in all that time I have not once run into anyone but a lactating woman who honestly cared about fetuses. Aside from people whose brains are marinated in prolactin, the political potency of abortion is based 100.00% on hatred of liberals. That is the alpha and the omega of the issue.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 7, 2009 10:15 PM | Report abuse

Libertarians are conservative on economic issues and liberal on social issues.

==

Maybe this was true 30 or 40 years ago but it certainly isn't true now.

I would say that libertarians are frankly sociopathic on economic issues and at best indifferent on social issues. Decades ago libertarianism was a scholarly and nuanced set of thought-out positions whose proponents came from a broad variety of eclectic political viewpoints. No longer.

The passion for liberty seems to have been replaced by a passion for money and guns and nothing else; I cannot for the life of me imagine libertarians assembling into body barricades to oppose anything in the social conservative agenda so long as they also got to keep another percentage or two of their income. And libertarians would bluntly champion expansion of corporate power, because aside from gun ownership the only freedom they ever EVER talk about has "economic" in front of it.

Conservatives want to bring back the days of coat-hanger abortions? Libertarians will note that being male they're not affected.

Conservatives want to repress gays? Libertarians will note that being heterosexual they're not affected.

Where libertarian do have socially liberal positions, they hold them with no real conviction. Money trumps everything.

And guns. Guns, guns, guns, guns. Our national fetish.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 7, 2009 10:11 PM | Report abuse

I honestly don't know what Pakastani food is like, though there used to be a terrific Afghani place called Caravan Serai in St. Paul, MN. I included Pakastanis as most of the curry houses in Sheffield, England, were run by Pakistanis. I'd love to visit any of these countries some day, though India seems most likely due to the security situation.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | November 7, 2009 8:54 PM | Report abuse

"@DDAWG-a worthy question. Not a straight comparison, though. Rand is looking to peak at a much better time than Hoffman (through no fault of Hoffman). Actually, I don't think Hoffman really got to peak at all...and having the R nominee endorse against him so close to the finish line didn't help much (nor did having the R's attacking him during most of the election). He still almost won.

As for socially conservative...Rand is solidly anti-abortion, pro-second amendment (those are big planks for me).

Finally, Rand is out-raising his opponent AND polling ahead of his opponent...Hoffman never did either, if I remember correctly (more's the pity).

Btw, you think KY is economically liberal? Err...liberal?

Posted by: lajdawg"

Well, Rand is running for Senate, Hoffman for Congress. You don't expect a Congressional candidate to raise the same money. I don't know if Hoffman was particularly close considering his cause celebre status and the makeup of the district. Not like he was some obscure candidate.

As for Rand Paul, I don't really know too much about his policies. I just assume that it's very similar to his father's which is a dumb assumption.

And when I say that Kentucky is economically liberal, I mean that they don't mind government spending and don't generally care about deficits.

That being said, I don't think many people in general are economic liberals. Deficits just isn't an issue that people care about. Sure, people will scream about it as a reason to rail against Obama, but I don't remember a tea party when Bush was in power. I don't remember anything that happened during the first half of the Reagan administration, but I don't think people complained about deficits then either.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 7, 2009 7:23 PM | Report abuse

@DDAWG-a worthy question. Not a straight comparison, though. Rand is looking to peak at a much better time than Hoffman (through no fault of Hoffman). Actually, I don't think Hoffman really got to peak at all...and having the R nominee endorse against him so close to the finish line didn't help much (nor did having the R's attacking him during most of the election). He still almost won.

As for socially conservative...Rand is solidly anti-abortion, pro-second amendment (those are big planks for me).

Finally, Rand is out-raising his opponent AND polling ahead of his opponent...Hoffman never did either, if I remember correctly (more's the pity).

Btw, you think KY is economically liberal? Err...liberal?

Posted by: lajdawg | November 7, 2009 6:01 PM | Report abuse

Dianne Feinstein is near to 80, and hasn't had a tough race since 1994, when she almost lost her Senate seat. She may prove more than a bit rusty on the campaign trail. (She is not a particularly inspiring/lively speaker.)

Jerry Brown is up there in years also, though not quite as elderly as DiFi.

If she gets into the race against Brown, I would look for a younger Democrat, perhaps self-funded, to also enter--and to make a generational pitch.

If there is only one elderly Democrat without any primary competition, then that person could well be California's next Governor.

Posted by: nettt | November 7, 2009 2:33 PM | Report abuse

With one lunch, "the Fox" has been restored to "the Fix." Such is the power and wisdom of 44. Major shout out to CC.

O-Nation

Posted by: broadwayjoe | November 7, 2009 2:31 PM | Report abuse

SENATE INTEL CHAIR FEINSTEIN: Patsy for Silent Military Coup?

FOOT HOOD MASSACRE: ECHOES OF 9-11? GULF OF TONKIN?

http://nowpublic.com/world/ft-hood-massacre-echoes-9-11-gulf-tonkin

Posted by: scrivener50 | November 7, 2009 2:05 PM | Report abuse

I wonder what kind of success Rand Paul will have. Kentucky doesn't strike me as a particularly libertarian state. Libertarians are conservative on economic issues and liberal on social issues. Kentucky is the opposite on both of those axes. They like government involvement and are very socially conservative.

One of the lessons that's been largely ignored from the NY-23 election is to see where the money is coming from. Hoffman was incapable of raising money from potential voters. That's big trouble even though he was awash in CFG money. Same question for Rand Paul. Is he getting money from Kentuckians? Out of state money is fine, but there's no substitute for getting voters to open up to you.

(and firefox spell checker seems to have no problem with "Kentuckians")

Posted by: DDAWD | November 7, 2009 1:26 PM | Report abuse

"State Treasurer Lexi Giannoulias"

With that name, it's weird to misspell the first. but it's Alexi.

Posted by: F_L_Palmer | November 7, 2009 12:39 PM | Report abuse

Wow. Cc. Drivl and Nambla have completed the conversion of your blog into their own personal ego site. What is all this crap?

Have fun with the new "moonbats R us" blog.

Posted by: snowbama | November 7, 2009 11:01 AM | Report abuse

G&T:

Thanks for the link. We're always looking for new hot sauces to try, though getting good ones is problematic here in Pennsyltucky. I'll look for the Wei Pao stuff next time I get to civilization.

Posted by: mnteng | November 7, 2009 10:21 AM | Report abuse

Btw, Cillizza, the lines are some of my favorite political reading over here. They break things down in an informative yet concise way that appeals to my time crunch. Much appreciation for the hard work you put into them. Salute!

Posted by: lajdawg | November 7, 2009 9:12 AM | Report abuse

10. I think there are a lot better targets for conservative ire then McCain.
9. MI, my old state, deserves a better governor. I laughed when I saw Granholm on a list of Obama's ecnomic advisors.
8. Paul has been leading a taxpayer group in KY for a long time, so he is more then just a "businessman". The last poll put him ahead of Greyson. I like the trend!
7. I haven't heard much policy talk from these three yet...and I'm from IL.
6. Ron Paul finished second in NV...maybe the R's there should track down his voters.
5. Not sure how I feel about the Cali candidates...but it is fascinating to watch. It's a whole country unto itself.
4. Dodd needs to go.
3. I was torn on Crist...no more. Cya.
2. Spectar was a nasty R...now he's worse.
1. I met Hutchinson when she came over here to Iraq to visit (I was cross-leveled to a TX unit). I was not impressed. Perry has beeen very vocal about how national issues affect his state...something more governors should be. Then again, I am an unabashed federalist. So is TX...Perry will win.

Posted by: lajdawg | November 7, 2009 9:02 AM | Report abuse

Found it.

http://www.weipao-tw.com/english/product_01.html

Middle of the page, "Super Hot Chili." This is THE real deal.

Company turns out to be Taiwanese, I'll bet that's not where their market is. It's not really a sauce, it's more like flavored chopped red chilis. Enough to barely cover your thumbnail is enough for an entire meal.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 7, 2009 12:06 AM | Report abuse

There is this one Chinese hot sauce .. running to the fridge ... Wei Pao brand Super Hot Chili .. some bottles are so hot that it almost feel like neurotoxin.

Sure, I can make my own hot sauce far too hot to use on anything, inedible, but that's deliberate. This stuff is SOLD this way, popular among SE Asians, and it's just stunningly hot. And oh, it's really tasty too.

Mostly we use the Indonesian one, Sambal Oelek. A gallon in about four months. Mild compared to Wei Pao.

I need to try the stuff you're talking about, though. It's made for people like me.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 11:45 PM | Report abuse

G&T:

The hottest thing I ever tasted was the hot sauce at Pecos Pit BBQ up near you. Don't know what they put in it but a little dab will definitely do you.

Posted by: mnteng | November 6, 2009 11:33 PM | Report abuse

I go to VN every year, the food there is fantastic but I had to admit finally that some of it is better over here. Particularly the sandwiches but that is changing fast and American Vietnamese go back and bring the memories with them.

Portions are bigger here, more meat, more everything, but everything is SO fresh over there .. meat was alive hours ago, if not seconds ago, and veggies are always garden fresh. Amazing how quickly this changes one's perception of our food over here, which starts to taste stale after a few weeks of eating Vietnamese.

Refrigerators in VN are for drinks and desserts, never for meat and vegetables.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 11:30 PM | Report abuse

G&T: That link again, once more for the West Coast as we old TV (and print) journos used to say:

FORT HOOD MASSACRE: ECHOES OF 9-11? GULF OF TONKIN?

http://nowpublic.com/world/ft-hood-massacre-echoes-9-11-gulf-tonkin

PS -- When I mentioned some of the effects of silent microwave/laser radiation attack, I forgot to mention inexplicable weight loss (I'm getting a Drudge Report mental picture), chronic exhaustion, head and body pain, confusion, blurry and degraded vision, cataracts, tumors... and after a while, cancer and premature death. Like I said, this is genocide and America 2009 is like Germany 1939-45 -- but because today's hi-tech Xyklon B is silent and invisible, it's been a quiet holocaust --- UNTIL NOW.

Posted by: scrivener50 | November 6, 2009 11:29 PM | Report abuse

I usually get noodle dishes, but they have soups too. Maybe I'll try that.

And Indian food is my favorite. Not much in New Orleans, but a lot in the DC area.

And I visited India about a year ago. I had never eaten so decadently. Such rich food, That combined with not working out for a month. I think I gained like ten pounds which I shed just like that when I got home.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 11:24 PM | Report abuse

I am being held hostage to this debilitating torture in my own home, and when I leave, the house usually shows signs of vandalism and surreptitious entry.

==

(SIGH)

yeah everything in your house has been replaced by exact replicas.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 11:18 PM | Report abuse

I keep meaning to go to this Thai noodle house nearby. I think I'll hit it up tomorrow.

==

Noodle soup or noodle dishes? I haven't had Thai soups in a while but I remember some eyes-rolling-back-in-head-good soups.

A few times I've had a Thai dipping sauce that uses the fish sauce ubiquitous in Vietnamese and with chopped five-alarm chilis floating in it. Hottest stuff I ever had. And fantastic.

And to think a lot of people think Szechwan is spicy!

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 11:13 PM | Report abuse

TO: Gold&Tanzanite @ 6:02 p.m.

Not so fast. If you click on the link below to the story, "Fort Hood Massacre: Echoes of 9-11, Gulf of Tonkin?" you will find a link to an article detailing how deposed Honduras President Manuel Zelaya has revealed that his nation's military has been torturing him and degrading his health with microwave directed energy weapons...

http://nowpublic.com/world/govt-tortures-me-silent-microwave-weapons-ousted-s-prez

...and it is happening to thousands of unjustly and inhumanely targeted Americans -- such as this longtime journalist, in my case starting in 2003 and continuing to the present moment.

THIS IS TORTURE, actually a "slow-kill" genocide, crimes against humanity -- and I would not be surprised if some of our nation's leaders have been similarly targeted and have no idea why their skin is discolored and moles are popping up on their cheeks and why they often feel sick and exhausted for no apparent reason.

I am being held hostage to this debilitating torture in my own home, and when I leave, the house usually shows signs of vandalism and surreptitious entry. Local county and federal law enforcement know what's happening, and still it continues.

The rule of law has broken down in Bucks County, PA and in counties throughout the nation and local law enforcement has been usurped and told not to interfere in a federal multi-agency Gestapo-like program begun under Bush-Cheney and allowed to continue under Obama -- that's what my reporting and my personal experiences indicate.

Thanks for all your concern for human rights. Welcome to Gestapo USA.

http://nowpublic.com/world/gestapo-usa-govt-funded-vigilante-network-terrorizes-america OR (if links are corrupted / disabled): http://NowPublic.com/scrivener RE: "GESTAPO USA"

Posted by: scrivener50 | November 6, 2009 11:08 PM | Report abuse

@BB: I dunno Pakistani cuisine but yeah, Indian rocks. Working in software I get it a lot. Surprisingly good meat dishes for a cuisine one usually thinks of as vegetarian.

Two words: Indian bread. Oh my god.

One word: Tandoori. OH my god.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 11:03 PM | Report abuse

@G&T - Indian/Pakistan. The Blade makes a mean Saag Paneer (techincally, it's an adaptation of a different recipe with more greens).

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | November 6, 2009 9:55 PM | Report abuse

Something to remember about California primary battles:

In Democratic Primaries Northern California candidates tend to defeat Southern California candidates. The Democratic base is primarily in Northern California.

In Republican Primaries Southern California candidates tend to defeat Northern California candidates.

Posted by: OHIOCITIZEN | November 6, 2009 9:42 PM | Report abuse

I keep meaning to go to this Thai noodle house nearby. I think I'll hit it up tomorrow.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 9:39 PM | Report abuse

Kentucky Democratic Senate primary should rank ahead of the McCain primary since Dems still have a decent chance of taking that open seat next year, especially if Paul is the Republican nominee and Conway wins the Democratic nod. Conway might be able to win the General regardless of who the Republican is.

Also, if Feinstein challenges Brown for the Gubernatorial nomination in California, watch for newly elected Rep. John Garamendi, who has been elected statewide as Lieutenant Governor, so has strong name recognition to run for Senate and be the immediate frontrunner. Rep. Jane Harman might also run, but would be too conservative to win a Democratic Primary.

Posted by: OHIOCITIZEN | November 6, 2009 9:39 PM | Report abuse

Let's hope the Fox didn't ask 44 about his long form birth certificate or why he's "withholding" flu vaccine. Or remark on how the failure of some clueless yahoo to win the Virginia governorship on Tuesday was a "referendum" on his Presidency.

==

.. or talk about how red-faced screamers at town halls represent some "legitimate" grass-roots reactions to "Obamacare."

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 8:07 PM | Report abuse

Too funnny, people. CC is in with the in crowd. But nothing here will change.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 8:01 PM | Report abuse

Italian food: decent, but overrated.

==

Perhaps. Still my favorite non-Asian cuisine. Of the Asian ones:

* Chinese, Thai: love'em, have something at least monthly

* Vietnamese: every day

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 7:57 PM | Report abuse

Italian food: decent, but overrated.

Flame away

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 7:48 PM | Report abuse

I don't know who originally coined the word "Palinite" but it's in the maisntream now. Gene Robinson used it in his column today. :)

Posted by: broadwayjoe | November 6, 2009 7:46 PM | Report abuse

Let it rest, Joe. Leave infantile name calling for the likes of snowball.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | November 6, 2009 7:36 PM | Report abuse

Let's hope the Fox just said, " I think arugula is cool, too" and left it at that.

==

One hopes.

Since the threads are dying down for the weekend I don't mind doing a topic drift .. another way the Palinites are behind the times is with American cuisine. We're becoming a very gourmet nation. Halibut and salad, and a pear tart? Sounds wonderful.

I live in a rural extension of Seattle and the grocery store I got has an antipasto bar that one'd only find in SF or NYC a few decades ago. I love it.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 7:36 PM | Report abuse

G&T: Yeah. You're proabbly right.

Let's hope the Fox didn't ask 44 about his long form birth certificate or why he's "withholding" flu vaccine. Or remark on how the failure of some clueless yahoo to win the Virginia governorship on Tuesday was a "referendum" on his Presidency.

Let's hope the Fox just said, " I think arugula is cool, too" and left it at that.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | November 6, 2009 7:28 PM | Report abuse

I'd rate the Stormy Daniels/ David Vitter primary ahead of the John McCain one.

Posted by: DDAWD | November 6, 2009 7:28 PM | Report abuse

So? Tomorrow will just be more Palin and Pawlenty puff pieces and never a single good word about the President.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 7:16 PM | Report abuse

The Fox (formerly the Fix) lunched with the 44th President of the United States, Barack H. Obama, today! Seriously. Developing...

From politico.com:

"Obama lunches with journos at WH

President Obama met with several journalists for lunch today at the White House, according to source with knowledge of the event.

The attendees for Friday’s lunch were as follows: CNN's David Gergen, Washington Post's Chris Cillizza, Newsweek's Jon Meacham and Howard Fineman, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Cynthia Tucker, POLITICO's Mike Allen, NPR/ Fox's Mara Liasson, Talking Points Memo's Josh Marshall and New York Times trio David Brooks, Andy Rosenthal, and Gail Collins.

Also on hand were administration officials: David Axelrod, Anita Dunn, Bill Burton, and Robert Gibbs.

The off-the-record lunch lasted about two hours, and included a green salad, halibut and and pear tart for dessert."

Full story:

http://www.politico.com/blogs/michaelcalderone/1109/Obama_meets_with_journos_at_the_WH.html

Congrats to CC.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | November 6, 2009 6:58 PM | Report abuse

Hey scrivener, excellent post. Thanks for leaving out the microwave stuff. Please feel free to do more great posts like this.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 6:02 PM | Report abuse

PREDICTION: ARLEN TO RETIRE, BACK SESTAK, ROCK THE POLITICAL WORLD WITH TELL-ALL (OR AT LEAST, MOST) BIO

"Snarlin' Arlen" has mellowed, and he's smart enough to know that many PA Dems will never regard him as one of their own, while the dashing Admiral has shown his sea legs as a party loyalist and as an effective pol with strong military cred and thus cross-over appeal.

I again predict Specter will gracefully bow out, endorse Sestak, devote the rest of his life to civil liberties and human rights, and write a blockbuster memoir that will finally answer some of history's mysteries while helping to remove a cancer on the Republic that has been allowed to feaster and grow since the assassinations of JFK, RFK and King...

... and a judicially-enabled coup d'etat that saw this nation descend into an eight-year Reign of Terror that still is refusing to release its death grip on democracy.

Case in point, perhaps:

FORT HOOD MASSACRE: ECHOES OF 9-11? GULF OF TONKIN?

http://nowpublic.com/world/ft-hood-massacre-echoes-9-11-gulf-tonkin

Posted by: scrivener50 | November 6, 2009 5:58 PM | Report abuse

Good list, CC.

How things have changed in a month ... half of The Line has turned over. FL R Senate jumps to #3, KY Senate shifts from D to R, NV R Senate shows up at #6. Fun!

Of course, the AZ R Senate race probably doesn't belong on The Line, but it is an interesting sideshow now especially since the Minutemen endorsed Hoffmann in NY-23.

Posted by: mnteng | November 6, 2009 5:42 PM | Report abuse

Compare that to the problems of a neocom statist majority with no offsetting minority power in D.C.

==

Tell that to the former minority power that tries to get cavemen into national office. They don't want to be an offsetting power, they want to be ideologically pure and far out on the margins.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 5:40 PM | Report abuse

drindl, Fix means that *other* conservative element of the GOP. The very wealthy part that shelters its money expertly. The part that owns companies that get no-bid contracts and make tons of profit off the government. The ones who run their financial concerns into the ditch and then let the little guys "make a back" for them so they can climb out first. The ones that buy their own media outlets and stock them with reporters who know how to represent their employer. The ones that get certain voters worked up, then organize them into "grass roots" movements so they can race around and disrupt things. The part that wants to run this country for themselves -- Low taxes, Small gov't, Less interference, Much smaller social net, everyone for themselves. The ones with the REALLY deep pockets.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | November 6, 2009 5:36 PM | Report abuse

"California's problems are the result of minority veto power."

Compare that to the problems of a neocom statist majority with no offsetting minority power in D.C. Much worse.

Posted by: leapin | November 6, 2009 5:34 PM | Report abuse

Tax at 100% of income and all the problems go away?

==

If you had anything to offer you wouldn't be reduced to this infantile hyperbole.

California's problems are the result of minority veto power. A Republican idea, and a stupid one. Pardon my redundancy.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | November 6, 2009 5:16 PM | Report abuse

"California has as many problems as it does because its system of idiotic referendums keep the tax rates artificially low. It's that simple.
"

Tax at 100% of income and all the problems go away?

Posted by: leapin | November 6, 2009 5:11 PM | Report abuse

California has as many problems as it does because its system of idiotic referendums keep the tax rates artificially low. It's that simple.

It's the same kind of idiocy 'conservatives' all over are proposing, and if enacted, will result in the same.

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 5:07 PM | Report abuse

When Jerry Brown makes the most sense in a group then you know why Cali,The GoldenandTanzanite State. has so many problems.

Posted by: leapin | November 6, 2009 4:47 PM | Report abuse

Here's a term you'll want to remember in the future for the race that officially launched the Republican Civil War...

The Urban Dictionary has added "Scozzafavaed" to its pages.

Scozzafavaed (Pronounced: /skoʊzəfavəd/) -verb
1. Purged of moderation, e.g., within in a Congressional district
2. Inadvertently revealed internal chaos, e.g., within in (sic) a political party
3. Adj., Doomed due to popular support of the GOP electorate
"Dude, you see Glenn Beck talking about how our congressman supports indoctrinating us in the ways of socialism through paper money last night?

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 4:34 PM | Report abuse

'remind people of the power of the most conservative element of the GOP"

You mean, to lose safe seats for the GOP and show up in DC and act like circus animals?

Posted by: drindl | November 6, 2009 4:33 PM | Report abuse

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