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Insta-CoGo: China, Tibet and the Olympics

Cindy Loose

Hotels and restaurants closed and tourists were ordered out of Lhasa Saturday after protests to China's repression in Tibet spilled into the streets. Protesters, in the largest display of force in 20 years, burned some buildings and stoned Chinese, who they feel have been sent en masse to Tibet to dilute the local population. Here's the latest report from The Post.

The Dalai Lama estimates 100 civilians were killed. The protests were quelled with tanks and a curfew. Even so, there are reports that authorities are going door to door with notices saying demostrators should turn themselves in or face unspecified repercussions, and neighbors are urged to report on neighbors.

The demand for freedom and the crackdown come as China is trying to put its best face forward as it prepares to host the Summer Olympics. If you happened to have the many, many dollars required to attend the Olympics, would the recent events convince you to sit them out this time around? Would you go a step further and urge countries to boycott the Games?

And to take a look at last Sunday's Coming & Going column (or CoGo), here's the link.

By Cindy Loose |  March 17, 2008; 11:44 AM ET  | Category:  Cindy Loose
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I'm an American living in Sichuan province, which neighbors Tibet. This time around, I think China's in the right and the Tibetans are in the wrong. Burning businesses owned by Han Chinese is not a "protest", it's an act of racist violence. The government had to take police action for the sake of public safety; would it be better for China's human rights record to let the riots continue?

I find it interesting that although people always claim that the media are biased in favor of Democrats, or biased in favor of Republicans, when it comes to Tibet they always believe the Dalai Lama's statistics and assume the Chinese government is lying.

Posted by: William | March 19, 2008 10:28 PM

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