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Posted at 3:59 PM ET, 02/15/2011

CBS News: Lara Logan sexually assaulted, beaten while covering Egypt president Hosni Mubarak's exit for '60 Minutes'

By Lisa de Moraes

CBS News Correspondent Lara Logan in Tahrir Square moments before she was assaulted. (CBS)

CBS News has issued a statement about their correspondent Lara Logan:

On Friday February 11, the day Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepped down, CBS Correspondent Lara Logan was covering the jubilation in Tahrir Square for a 60 MINUTES story when she and her team and their security were surrounded by a dangerous element amidst the celebration. It was a mob of more than 200 people whipped into a frenzy.

In the crush of the mob, she was separated from her crew. She was surrounded and suffered a brutal and sustained sexual assault and beating before being saved by a group of women and an estimated 20 Egyptian soldiers. She reconnected with the CBS team, returned to her hotel and returned to the United States on the first flight the next morning. She is currently in the hospital recovering.

There will be no further comment from CBS News and Correspondent Logan and her family respectfully request privacy at this time.

Logan has been CBS News's chief foreign correspondent since February of 2006; she joined the network in 2002.

On Feb. 3, news sources reported that Logan and her crew had been detained by Egyptian police outside Cairo's Israeli embassy, and that she had been taken to the airport the next morning and expelled from the country.

Her detention came shortly after Logan reported on the stepped up efforts by Mubarak's regime to crack down on foreign journalists covering the protests.

CBS declined to comment at the time about her detention and expulsion, telling Time magazine that "for security reasons CBS will not be commenting on, or revealing in any way, CBS personnel activity, movement or location."

On Feb. 11, the same day CBS News says Logan was sexually assaulted and beaten, she told Esquire magazine's The Politics blog she had returned to Cairo that day, just as Mubarak was leaving.

"Lara Logan, you see, is not afraid," Esquire reported Feb 11.

"There's no doubt in my mind that the situation we were caught in before, we are now arriving into again," she told the blog.

Logan told Esquire that the Egyptian government had dispensed with standard procedure and started using checkpoints that foreign journalists usually "breezed" through to interrogate them. She told the blog, "they searched journalists until they found the cameras...and when they found the cameras, that was it."

According to Logan, "They don't tell you what's going on because they don't want you to have any defense. They don't want you to be able to help yourself." By "they," she said when asked, she meant the Egyptian army.

Wrapping up her interview with the blog on Feb. 11, Logan said, "The army as an institution is not on the people's side. The army is on its own side. They want to be with the winners. That's who they're going to stand with. If it looks like it's going to be the people, they're with the people... The army's playing to win."

"This is the Tianamen Square of the cyber age - there's no question," she said.

As she rang off, the blogger asked her one final question: "Is CBS insured for this [expletive]? Are you insane?"

"You know, I don't worry about things like that," she responded.

Developing...

By Lisa de Moraes  | February 15, 2011; 3:59 PM ET
Categories:  TV News  
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Comments

I'm a 60 yr old women, a veteran of the feminist movement. It was naive on her part to think nothing bad would happen. Sure, she's been covering war zones, but with US military protection. CBS showed bad judgement exposing her to attack by a mob. The same thing could happen to any woman, especially the info-babes networks put on camera, covering gang violence in our inner cities. You dangle meat in front of a pack of dogs and act surprised when it gets devoured? One more reason women don't belong in combat, imagine if they get taken prisoner.

Posted by: RitaSantaFe | February 15, 2011 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Let the facts speak for themselves. From Fishbowl DC:

"We hear the “Baghdad Bombshell” has quietly wed defense contractor Joe Burkett, whose child she’s expecting in January. A friend of the couple confirms, “They got married a few weeks ago in a friend’s apartment in New York City.” Last year, two years after splitting with husband Jason Siemon, Logan, 37, started a war-zone romance with CNN correspondent Michael Ware. When they broke up, she started dating Burkett, whose marriage was on its last legs."

http://www.mediabistro.com/fishbowldc/lara-logan-gets-hitched_b13953

Posted by: RepealObamacareNow | February 15, 2011 5:08 PM | Report abuse

I am sorry for what Lara Logan experienced. IT is horrible.

Reporters (not Lara) tried too hard to become part of the story. I felt Anderson Cooper goaded on many protesters. These same reporters do not do that with dissidents in Cuba or Iran.

Lara is a good reporters, I hope she recovers quickly.

Posted by: Cornell1984 | February 15, 2011 5:09 PM | Report abuse

I take the point that she had a entourage for protection. But clearly that wasn't enough. In the future American media outlets should beef up their security if they send young women into harms way. The Middle East is notorious for brutality to women anyway. If this can happen in Egypt, then any future civil disorders elsewhere will be even more dangerous to Western women on the scene.
Even though we in America are just hearing about this, some 4 days old news, I'll bet that in Arab social media, the news of the rape is common knowledge.

Posted by: dobygillas | February 15, 2011 5:27 PM | Report abuse

@cmburns2....THANK YOU!!! I mean, come on people she is an adult! She can go wherever she wants and guess what? She shouldn't have to expect to be raped and beaten wherever she goes. Women aren't infantile and helpless. Women shouldn't have to be taught how to avoid rape. Men should be taught not to rape. Sick of hearing that women can't handle anything.

Posted by: amccain6 | February 15, 2011 7:34 PM | Report abuse

Ironic that it was 20 soliders that came to her aid when she had written about the Egyptian army with such condemnation? Also, this doesn't have anything to do with being Muslim, men of all religions, nationalities and ethnities don't value women, even red-blooded American males. http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/peace-corps-congress-investigate-peace-corps-treatment-sex/story?id=12777476

Posted by: kblowry | February 16, 2011 8:27 AM | Report abuse

It's sad. I felt sick reading this story, but even sicker reading the comments.

Posted by: disgruntledfan | February 16, 2011 8:30 AM | Report abuse

This event goes beyond only Muslim views about women — rape happens EVERYWHERE, all around the world, every single day! It even happens to men. Stop blaming the victim for what happened to her by saying she shouldn't have been there doing her job. This could just have easily happened to a male, or even a child. It's a dangerous situation for ANYONE to be in.

Posted by: JLHU | February 16, 2011 9:45 AM | Report abuse

@dobygillas, here-here! Why didn't she have security? This should never have happend and I wish her only the best. A non-profit security firm [Humanitarian Defense] just posted a case study on this situation and they make a few great points. Two stand out to me, 1: trust you gut - if you think you are heading into a bad area, don't go. and 2: don't trust local security guards. It is a pretty long post but should be read by anyone working overseas. http://j.mp/h3CUeo

Posted by: sandjm | February 18, 2011 3:59 AM | Report abuse

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