Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
About this Blog   |   On Twitter   |   Follow us on Facebook   |   RSS Feeds RSS Feed

Virginia Politics Blog: February 10, 2008 - February 16, 2008

Feder's Fat Wallet

Judy Feder, one of the Democratic challengers to U.S. Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R-Va.) this year, has made CQ Politics' top 10 list of best-funded, opposite party challengers. She's ranked ninth in the cash-on-hand department. Feder is known for her fund-raising abilities. In 2006, she amassed more than $1.5 million in her first match-up against the popular 14-term incumbent, who raised just over $1.7 million....

By Sandhya Somashekhar  |  February 16, 2008; 9:05 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (4)
Categories:  Election 2008/Congress , Sandhya Somashekhar  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Connolly Makes It Official

Gerald E. Connolly, chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, formally announced his candidacy for Congress yesterday. Connolly is seeking the Democratic nomination in the 11th Congressional District. He faces three opponents: former congresswoman and state senator Leslie L. Byrne, community activist Douglas J. Denneny and physical therapist Lori P. Alexander....

By Amy Gardner  |  February 15, 2008; 8:27 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (12)
Categories:  Amy Gardner  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Obama (Almost) Sweeps Northern Virginia

So how bad did Sen. Barack Obama thrash Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton in Northern Virginia on Tuesday? According to the state Board of Elections, Clinton (D-N.Y.) didn't win a single precinct in Alexandria. She won one in Arlington (Arlington Mill) and one in Loudoun (Guilford). She won three in Prince William (Stonewall, Park and Potomac View). She also won seven in Fairfax County (Ravensworth, Holmes, Edsall, Parklawn, Lynbrook, Greenspring and Virginia Hills). But Obama (D-Ill.) swept every other precinct in the core of Northern Virginia, often by a 2 to 1 margin. There are 27 precincts in Alexandria, 51 in Arlington, 73 in Prince William, 63 in Loudoun and 232 in Fairfax County. Earlier today, the Virginia Democratic Party estimated Obama will be awarded 54 Virginia pledged delegates. Clinton will get 29....

By Tim Craig  |  February 14, 2008; 4:10 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (4)
Categories:  Election 2008/President , Tim Craig  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

A Superdelegate Sticks with Clinton in an Obama State

Virginia Democrats overwhelmingly prefer Sen. Barack Obama (Ill.) for president, as his 28-point victory this week over Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (N.Y.) showed. But one state lawmaker from Richmond who will have a vote at the Democratic National Convention in the influential group of party leaders known as superdelegates said today she's unlikely to abandon her support of Clinton....

By Tim Craig  |  February 14, 2008; 12:27 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (6)
Categories:  Tim Craig  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Potomac Primary Roundup: Weather Can't Stop McCain, Obama

Despite sleet and strong winds, voters in the District, Maryland and Virginia braved the cold and other weather to cast their ballots in yesterday's Potomac Primary. U.S. Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., won a convincing sweep over Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., while U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., himself swept Alabama Gov. Mike Huckabee. Over 1.3 million voters cast ballots in Virginia, with Democrats heavily outnumbering Republicans. Last night's results troubled John H. Hager, the Virginia's Republican Party chairman, who called Obama "America's most liberal U.S. senator. ... Despite his rhetoric he offers only the same old liberal policies of higher taxes, bigger government and retreat on the war on terror," Hager said in a Richmond Times-Dispatch article. But much analysis of last night's Virginia results suggests that many Republicans voted for Obama in order to cast a ballot against what Studley's Dave Smith told the Times-Dispatch is perceived as "the Clinton...

By Washington Post Editors  |  February 13, 2008; 3:41 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Why Va. Didn't Keep Polls Open Later

Because of heavy turnout and icy weather in Northern Virginia, some voters were asking yesterday why the state didn't keep the polls open later, as Maryland did. Here's why: Susan Pollard, a spokeswoman for the Virginia State Board of Elections, said that a request for longer poll hours would have to come from one of the political parties and approved by a judge. No one requested an extension, she said....

By Steve Fehr  |  February 13, 2008; 2:49 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (3)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Estimated Turnout Today

Estimated turnout for Virginia primary from Edison/Mitofsky: Democrat: 930,000, or 16% of voting age population Republican: 505,000, or 8% of voting age population In 2004, 396,223 voted in the Virginia Democratic primary, so turnout increased more than 130 percent. Young voters, age 17-29, made up 14 percent of all voters this time; in 2004, they made up 8 percent. In the February, 2000 GOP primary, 664,093 voted, so Republican turnout was down this time....

By Steve Fehr  |  February 12, 2008; 9:50 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (3)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Va. GOP Statement on Primary

Republican Party of Virginia Chairman John Hager released the following statement in reaction to the results of Virginia's presidential primaries: I want to congratulate Senator McCain on his victory today in Virginia's presidential primary. Governor Huckabee and Congressman Paul should also be proud of their hard-fought campaigns here in the Commonwealth....

By Steve Fehr  |  February 12, 2008; 9:30 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Gov. Kaine Statement on Obama Win

Statement of the Governor on Senator Barack Obama's Virginia Democratic Primary Win: RICHMOND - I want to congratulate my friend Barack Obama on his win today in Virginia's Democratic primary. Both Senator Obama and Senator Clinton deserve credit for their hard work and their spirited campaigning across Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C. We've fielded a tremendous group of Democratic candidates this year, and we should be proud of their incredible work....

By Steve Fehr  |  February 12, 2008; 8:24 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Slick Roads Delay Irate Voter

Faridon Mohtashemi said he left work at Wachovia Bank in Crystal City an hour early to vote but was stuck in traffic for 2 1/2 hours. When he arrived at Hayfield Secondary School near his home in the Kingstowne section of Fairfax County it was 7:03 p.m. --three minutes after the official closing time. He said he saw a woman removing the voting sign in the parking lot and asked if he could cast a ballot, but was told "sorry, we're closed." "It's very disheartening that they couldn't extend the hours when they knew what was happening with the weather," he said....

By Steve Fehr  |  February 12, 2008; 8:03 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Stickers, Chili, Taters and Kisses

Sights, smells and tastes from a busy election day: Voters shuffled in from the cold, grey weather to the warm back room of the Leesburg Fire House and were greeted by the aroma of the poll workers' cooking chili. Precinct chief Mary Ann Glennon, working her eighth election, said her team has had a busy day, with 455 Democrats and 175 Republicans voting by around 2:10 p.m. There are 2,481 registered voters in her precinct area. The precinct's biggest glitch?...

By Washington Post editors  |  February 12, 2008; 4:43 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

NoVa's GOP Voters Speak

Throughout the day, Post reporters have found some GOP voters in Virginia are gravitating toward Sen. John McCain as the party's all-but-certain nominee but others remain reluctant to embrace the Arizona Republican. Post reporter Nick Miroff found Republican voters in Prince William County who backed Huckabee said they knew their candidate was a long shot, but went for him anyway. "I like his religious beliefs," said Dan Boger, 73, a real estate investor voting at Potomac Middle School in Dumfries, adding that he wasn't worried about the candidate's improbable odds. "The Lord's going to take care of that," he said. Woodbridge resident Amy Taylor, a 57-year-old social worker who described herself as Christian and pro-life, said Huckabee was "the only true conservative." "I think the media's largely ignored him," she groused. "Hillary and Obama have gotten all the attention." The tight Democratic race seems like too much "infighting" to Jaime...

By Washington Post editors  |  February 12, 2008; 4:40 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Some Immigrant Views

As immigration remains a volatile issue, immigrants are making their voices heard. Nabil Masri, 55, a banker and Woodbridge resident, told reporter Nick Miroff he knows a good deal when he sees one, so he voted for the senator who used to be a first lady. That's Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) "I liked her husband and I like her," he said. "It's two for the price of one." Masri, of Palestinian descent, said he considers Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) "untested" but believes Clinton has the strength and personality to "stand up and fight," especially to get the country's troops out of Iraq. "I'm Arab American, so I want to see this war end," he said. Venezuelan immigrant and Woodbridge resident Cecilia Reynoso said she also voted for Clinton. She wants to see "what a woman can do," she said, and likes the New York senator's smarts and experience. "I want...

By Washington Post editors  |  February 12, 2008; 4:29 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Dem Voters Speak Out in NoVa

Post reporters are finding some strong opinions among the divided Democratic electorate in Virginia. In Loudoun County, one couple told Jonathan Mummolo why they voted for Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) Scott Sammler Michael, 45, a minister, said that he had been a fan of former North Carolina senator John Edwards but that Obama won him over. "I'm really excited about how much hope he seems to inspire in people." Of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.), he said he's wary of having a chain of Bushes and Clintons in the White House for more than 20 years. "I don't like the dynastic thing," he said....

By Washington Post editors  |  February 12, 2008; 4:20 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Vote Splitting and Hot Chocolate

In Reston, Lorrie-Ann Melnick, 40, a preschool teacher, ducked out of the the frigid weather yesterday afternoon for a hot chocolate with her four-year-old son Evan after she cast a vote for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D). "I feel really good about her decision-making in the past under pressure," Melnick told reporter Mike Laris. "She's always acted in a way that there's a lot of integrity and reflects my values." When Clinton makes a mistake, she owns up to it, Melnick said. "I feel like she really takes responsibility for herself," she said. But her pro-Clinton stance is a lonely one at home. "I'm the only one in my family for Hillary Clinton. The boys are all for Obama," Melnick said. That includes her husband, her 6 year old son and little Evan. So why Obama? "Cool!" Evan said. In Loudoun County this morning, reporter Jonathan Mummolo also stumbled onto...

By Washington Post editors  |  February 12, 2008; 4:05 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

More about Lines

The lines stretched long in the lobby of the Verizon building in Arlington, longer than Rafael Beltran III had ever seen them in his four years working at the polling place. "Something or someone has energized the voters," Beltran told Post reporter Theresa Vargas, adding that Democrats had shown up in unusual force. "For the first time in years, some candidate or some message is coming out loud and clear." The poll workers had started their day at 4:30 am and were running on coffee and water by 8:30 a.m. The lines were no shorter by 10 a.m. "By now we would be playing cards," Beltran, chief of elections for that voting location, said in mid-morning. "Right now it would have been totally dead." Instead, he was thinking about the rest of the day and whether he would have to call the county to see if a judge would allow...

By Washington Post editors  |  February 12, 2008; 3:50 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Lines, Lines, Lines

Reporter Jerry Markon learns this afternoon from the Virginia State Board of Elections that voter turnout is heavy statewide and is expected to wind up being about 30 to 40 percent of registered voters -- in the range of what the board had projected. "People are interested and excited about this presidential primary, and they definitely want their voices heard,'' elections board spokeswoman Susan Pollard said. She said this year's projected turnout can't be compared to other recent Virginia presidential primaries because the state hasn't had one with both parties on the ballot for nearly two decades. In 2004, Democrats held a presidential primary, but Republicans didn't, while in 2000 there was only a Republican primary. The last presidential primary to feature both parties was in 1988, the elections board said. That year, Democratic turnout was 14.3 percent, while Republican turnout was 8.9 percent. Pollard said there are reports of...

By Washington Post editors  |  February 12, 2008; 3:18 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

A Hands-On Civics Lesson

Post reporter Jackie Spinner checked out some preparations for today's presidential primaries on both sides of the Potomac River. About 50 Arlington high school students were expected this morning to get a real-time civics lesson as poll workers. Teacher Casey Robinson gave her senior government class at H.B. Woodlawn Secondary Program an edict: Don't wear jeans. "You're not just my students. You represent H.B.," Robinson told them Monday. "If they ask you to look nice, look nice." Most of her students were planning to get up at 4:30 or so to help prepare polling stations in Northern Virginia for the 6 a.m. opening. "Most important thing...please be on time," Robinson told the students. "You need a wake-up call? I'm happy to wake up to call you." For many of these students, it was their first detailed view of democracy in action. Chris Kendall, 18, compared the election day assignment to...

By Washington Post editors  |  February 12, 2008; 8:40 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Potomac Primary Round-Up

In the days leading up to tomorrow's primary, washingtonpost.com and The Washington Post are combing the web for news and opinion outside the region to supplement our coverage with additional viewpoints. We're posting what we find here and to our Maryland Politics blog. The campaigns are descending upon local universities in search of the youth vote. Bill Clinton stumped for his wife at Virginia Tech Saturday night, prompting student Rohan Mathur to tell campus publication Collegiate Times, "I wish it was four more years for Bill Clinton...In a way, if [Hillary Clinton is] in office (his policies) will come back in." On Sunday night, it was Chelsea Clinton's turn -- she headed to the University of Maryland, speaking with about 250 students and supporters in the Stamp Student Union food court about "universal health care, the No Child Left Behind Act, the war in Iraq and many other issues," according...

By Liz Heron  |  February 11, 2008; 5:47 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Updated: Clinton and Sabato at U.-Va.

Post reporter Susan Kinzie caught up with Hillary Rodham Clinton today at the University of Virginia. Here's her report: It's not every intro class that students will line up waiting in the cold for. But yesterday afternoon, the day before the election, Professor Larry J. Sabato had a guest lecturer: Hillary Rodham Clinton. Sabato, a legendary professor at the University of Virginia, invited each of the candidates to his 450-student Introduction to American Politics class, and her campaign agreed. Clinton spent well over an hour taking questions from students on issues ranging from the war in Iraq to universal health care to taxes to biofuels, answering in considerable depth, with policy details and personal anecdotes....

By Steve Fehr  |  February 11, 2008; 5:04 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Winners & Losers from JJ Dinner

Here are some winners and losers from the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson Jackson Day dinner Saturday night in Richmond. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) spoke to about 6,000 party activists and donors. Before the event, which also featured speeches from a elected leaders and party officials, hundreds of Clinton and Obama supporters faced off outside the Stuart C. Siegel Center on the campus of Virginia Commonwealth University. Winners: Barack Obama Virginia organizers: Obama supporters appeared to outnumber Clinton supporters by about 3 to 1. Before the dinner, about 300 Obama supporters paraded down one of Richmond's busiest streets to show their support for their candidate. The Obama campaign, aided by Gov. Timothy M. Kaine's (D) trusted political aide Charlie Kelly, even brought in a marching band to lead the group. There was little doubt inside or outside the Siegel Center that Obama supporters appeared...

By Tim Craig  |  February 11, 2008; 1:06 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Election 2008/President , Election 2008/U.S. Senate , James P. Moran Jr. , James Webb , Mark Warner , Timothy M. Kaine , Winners and Losers  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Obama Greets Supporters in Alexandria

Sen. Barack Obama arrived at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria just before 2 p.m. today, greeting thousands of supporters in a packed gymnasium and hundreds more hoping for a glimpse outside. Obama came to Virginia on the heels of a sweeping victory in three smaller states Saturday. He is hoping to ride his momentum to victory in the region in Tuesday's first-ever "Potomac Primary", when voters in D.C., Maryland and Virginia will go to the polls. Obama is expected to do well on all three contests, but just how well could improve his momentum heading into the much larger and more important Texas and Ohio primaries next month. Obama used Williams' history as a racially and economically divided community -- as told in the book and movie "Remember the Titans" -- to describe his agenda to improve quality and access to public and higher education....

By Amy Gardner  |  February 10, 2008; 3:53 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (22)
Categories:  Amy Gardner  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Jim Moran to Endorse Obama Today

U.S. Rep. James P. Moran, a Democrat who represents the inner suburbs in Northern Virginia, will endorse Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill) today, sources said. Moran, who has represented the 8th District since 1991, is scheduled to appear at an Obama town hall meeting this afternoon in Alexandria to announce his choice. Moran's decision means all three Democratic congressmen from Virginia have lined up behind Obama over Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY.)...

By Tim Craig  |  February 10, 2008; 12:27 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (161)
Categories:  Election 2008/President , Tim Craig  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company