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Fairfax survey finds fewer homeless people

The number of homeless people in Fairfax County has fallen by almost 11 percent since last year, according to a one-day survey made public Tuesday.

A point-of-time survey, conducted by homeless shelter operators in the Northern Virginia locality Jan. 27, counted 1,544 people as homeless. In 2009, 1,730 people were counted as homeless during a similar January survey.

The biggest drop was seen in the number of homeless families, which decreased by more than 16 percent.

More than a third of those counted were children, officials said, and more than 60 percent of adults in homeless families were employed. About 60 percent of the single individuals identified suffered from serious mental illness or substance abuse problems.

-- Derek Kravitz

By Washington Post Editors  |  April 6, 2010; 1:44 PM ET
Categories:  Derek Kravitz , Fairfax County  
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Comments

Meanwhile MoCo's homeless and low income population continue to explode, while all the areas high quality jobs grow in Fairfax

Posted by: skinsfan15 | April 6, 2010 3:43 PM | Report abuse

I'd love to know why there is such a big drop. Improvements with county services? Moved? Got jobs? Incorrect counting? There is a big story here. I'd like to read more about the reasons for the drop.

Posted by: queen522 | April 6, 2010 11:02 PM | Report abuse

Sometimes from year to year decisions are made to change who to count which changes the data point. Given the economic times it is either a great program or perhaps a decision was made to not count folks who had been previously part of a counted group. It would be interesting to see how each year was counted.

Posted by: mak4 | April 8, 2010 10:20 AM | Report abuse

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