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Posted at 4:12 PM ET, 11/30/2010

Howell, other officials launch campaign to repeal federal laws

By Anita Kumar
Anita Kumar

House Speaker Bill Howell joined with leaders of other states Tuesday to kick off a national push to support a constitutional amendment allowing two-thirds of the states to collectively repeal a federal law or regulation.

Thirty-eight states would need to support a call for an amendment convention. So far, 10 states, including Virginia, are supportive, said Marianne Moran, executive director of the Repeal Amendment.

"The federal government has long ago usurped the power reserved to the states and the people via our Constitution,'' Howell said in a statement. "However, our founders anticipated a time in our nation where the federal government's power would become out of balance -- and in their wisdom provided a way out via Article V. The Repeal Amendment restores the balance of power between the states and federal government."

Other Virginians who support the proposal, but who did not attend Tuesday's news conference, include Gov. Bob McDonnell, Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli and Rep. Bob Goodlatte, all Republicans. Virginia leaders plan to push a resolution through the legislature in January.

The news conference took place at the same hotel in Washington where the American Legislative Exchange Council, a pro-business, free-market group, is holding its annual meeting so state leaders could attend both events. ALEC ghostwrites bills on a variety on subjects that are pushed by its members -- both legislators as well as private companies, which pay thousands of dollars to become members of ALEC, giving them a say in what legislation the group backs. Howell served as the group's national chairman in 2009.

By Anita Kumar  | November 30, 2010; 4:12 PM ET
Categories:  Anita Kumar, Bill Bolling, Ken Cuccinelli, Robert F. McDonnell, William Howell  
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Comments

Nullification? Really? You gotta admire the timing. Just in time for the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

Posted by: NTPNate | November 30, 2010 6:01 PM | Report abuse

What a great idea. And county governments should be able to overturn laws passed by state legislatures, and municipal governments should be able to toss laws passed by counties, and individuals like you and me should be able to disregard any law we want whenever we want.

Dan

Posted by: dbuck1 | November 30, 2010 9:50 PM | Report abuse

What a great idea. And county governments should be able to overturn laws passed by state legislatures, and municipal governments should be able to toss laws passed by counties, and individuals like you and me should be able to disregard any law we want whenever we want.

Dan

Posted by: dbuck1 | November 30, 2010 9:50 PM | Report abuse

What a great idea. And county governments should be able to overturn laws passed by state legislatures, and municipal governments should be able to toss laws passed by counties, and individuals like you and me should be able to disregard any law we want whenever we want.

Dan

Posted by: dbuck1 | November 30, 2010 9:51 PM | Report abuse

What a great idea. And county governments should be able to overturn laws passed by state legislatures, and municipal governments should be able to toss laws passed by counties, and individuals like you and me should be able to disregard any law we want whenever we want.

Dan

Posted by: dbuck1 | November 30, 2010 9:53 PM | Report abuse

The multi-posting around here is becoming unbearable.

Posted by: Simon23p | November 30, 2010 10:30 PM | Report abuse

This wouldn't even be necessary if we hadn't adopted the 17th Amendment. Until a hundred years ago, states had this power -- by appointing senators to represent the states' interests in that body of Congress. If a senator didn't follow the will of the state government, they got replaced.

Posted by: JTR555 | December 1, 2010 11:41 AM | Report abuse

States rights here we come!

GOP - We're not racist but we're #1 with racists!

Posted by: mikefromArlington | December 1, 2010 11:42 AM | Report abuse

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