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In Woodbridge: 'We should be turned around by now."

Christopher Dean Hopkins

The voters in the Lake Ridge area want change, they said, many coming out to support Keith Fimian. Election officials said they have seen a steady flow in voters with 795 people -- about 27 percent of those registered -- through the doors by 2 p.m.

"This year we need a change in Congress," Woodbridge resident Rudy Mallari, 54, said, noting he supported Gerry Connolly in the last election. "Because of the economy, we have lost a lot of jobs. I think (Fimian) can help rebuild the economy. "

Woodbridge resident Mary Hale, 63, also said she wants to see change and would be fine if the shakeup predicted on Election Night becomes a reality.

"I want to see more of a balance in Congress," she said. " I also want to see more interaction between the two parties. "

Hale said health care is the biggest issue for her. "We have a good health-care system, it just needs to be more accessible," she said. "I'm not sure, however, how it will be financed. "

Woodbridge resident Jennifer Bridges , 53, said she is a longtime supporter of the Republican party and hopes Fimian can help turn the economy around.

"I'm tired of everything moving so slow; we should be turned around by now," she said.

By Jennifer Buske  | November 2, 2010; 3:10 PM ET
Categories:  2010 Virginia Congressional Races, Election 2010, Gerald E. Connolly, Jennifer Buske, Keith Fimian, Prince William  
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Next: In Woodbridge, diverging perspectives on Connolly

Comments

It's only 2 years after the financial crisis, how could we possibly be turned around by now?

Record low interest rates and bank securitization fueled a housing bubble that caused people to believe they were wealthier than they really were and enabled them to spend beyond their means.

In short the past decade was not "normal". The economy is in a process of retrenching and recovering but it will take years.

Posted by: twigmuffin | November 3, 2010 9:04 PM | Report abuse

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