Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
About this Blog   |   On Twitter   |   Follow us on Facebook   |   RSS Feeds RSS Feed
Posted at 4:05 PM ET, 02/14/2011

Equal Rights Amendment, bipartisan redistricting die in subcommittee

By Rosalind S. Helderman
Rosalind S. Helderman

A subcommittee of the House of Delegates has, as expected, killed a Senate bill that would have made Virginia the 36th state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

The Democratic-led Senate adopted the bill last week, the first time the measure received a vote of a full chamber of the General Assembly since 1980. Following its 1972 adoption by Congress, the ERA amendment was ratified by 35 states -- three short of the 38 necessary for inclusion in the Constitution.

A time limit imposed by Congress for ratifying the amendment has since expired. But Sen. Patsy Ticer (D-Alexandria), the bill's sponsor, said some attorneys believe the issue remains live.

Ticer said Monday that her bill died after it failed to receive a second after its adoption was moved in subcommittee. The panel did not comment on the bill, she said. "We have a very backwards group of men on that group whose wives haven't yet enlightened them as to the necessity of this," she said.

The same subcommittee also killed a proposal by Sen. R. Creigh Deeds (D) to amend Virginia's constitution to create a new bipartisan commission to draw new legislative maps every 10 years in response to the census. It was at least the ninth year in a row that the House has killed a proposal passed by the senate to create a bipartisan redistricting commission.


By Rosalind S. Helderman  | February 14, 2011; 4:05 PM ET
Categories:  General Assembly 2011, House of Delegates, Rosalind Helderman, State Senate  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Kaine to appear at Democrats' Jefferson-Jackson dinner
Next: Budget conference to meet with McDonnell as work of compromise begins

No comments have been posted to this entry.

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company