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Posted at 7:49 PM ET, 02/11/2011

The 2011 bills: Where do they stand?

By The Associated Press


Here's the fate of some of the key bills as the Virginia General Assembly at the halfway point of the 2011 legislative session. The session is scheduled to end Feb. 26.


SURVIVED

--Gov. Bob McDonnell's $4 billion transportation financing proposal, which includes using nearly $3 billion in debt to begin highway projects.

--Require new, two-year state budgets to be written in odd-numbered years, not in even-numbered ones as they are now.

--Prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation in state hiring.

--Ask Congress for a constitutional amendment allowing two-thirds of state legislatures to void federal laws they oppose.

--Exempt goods made and sold within Virginia from federal laws and regulation.

--Ask Congress to "honor state sovereignty under the 10th Amendment" by repealing compulsory federal laws forced onto states.

--Eliminate Virginia's unique requirement that sixth-grade girls receive a vaccination against a sexually transmitted virus that can cause cervical cancer.

--Allow pari-mutuel style betting on past horse races with some of the proceeds going to transportation.

--Expand protective orders for those in dating relationships and anyone who feels threatened.

--Allow darker window tint on vehicles.

--Extend the amount of time child sex assault victims have to file civil lawsuits.

--Allow inmates to help maintain Virginia's rest stops.

--Anti-immigrant measures, including bills that would prohibit undocumented students from enrolling in public colleges, bar illegal immigrants from receiving public assistance, require law enforcement officers to check immigration status, and increase the use of federal e-Verify worker database.

--Create a tax-break program that would award up to $25 million in annual credits to companies that donate to foundations that provide private-school scholarships to needy students.

--Require some employer health care plans to cover a treatment for autistic children.

--Require elementary and middle schools to offer at least 150 minutes per week of physical education.

--Require the Virginia State Crime Commission to study the state's civil commitment program for sexually violent predators. A portion of the bill that would have required study of using physical castration was removed.

--Protect prayers made in public forums such as classrooms and school athletic events.

--Allow the state to help pay for private religious or theological education for National Guard chaplains.

--Allow drivers to be pulled over and ticketed for talking on cell phones or texting.

--Require drug screening for those receiving some welfare benefits.

--Require a three-fifths vote by both chambers of the General Assembly to imposes taxes or fees.

--Ban computer-based sweepstakes games that offer points for Internet, phone time or other items purchased that can be played on games in an attempt to win money.

--Allow car title lenders to make loans to vehicle owners in other states.

--Ban synthetic marijuana.

DIED

--Privatize liquor retailing to generate money for highway improvements.

--Prohibit state agencies, including colleges and universities, from enacting gun laws that are more stringent than those passed by the legislature.

--Expand the death penalty to those who participate in a rape and murder but don't do the actual killing.

--Establish an alternative currency for Virginia should the Federal Reserve collapse.

--Eliminate the requirement to get a permit to carry a concealed handgun.

--Allow concealed handgun permits issued in any state good in Virginia.

--Require background checks from all buyers at gun shows.

--Allow local school divisions to keep unspent state and local funds for use the following year.

--Allow claims of sovereign immunity to be heard by the state Supreme Court before a trial.

--Reduce prison sentences for inmates with good behavior.

--Require a prescription for cold medicines often used in the manufacture of methamphetamines

--Impose a 5-cent tax on paper bags and disposable plastic bags.

--Cap the amount of interest on payday and car title loans at 36 percent.

--Shift management of menhaden from the Virginia General Assembly to a state regulatory agency.

By The Associated Press  | February 11, 2011; 7:49 PM ET
Categories:  General Assembly 2011, General Assembly  | Tags:  virginia general assembly  
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