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Political Meddling in the FDA, Unhealthy Mining, More Blagojevich Scandal

POSTED: 07:28 PM ET, 01/16/2009 by Derek Kravitz

The editors at Post Investigations have scoured the nation's top in-depth and investigative reports from this past week and selected their most interesting finds.

Agree? Disagree? See anything we've missed? Let us know.

FDA Official Overruled Scientist on Cancer Device » An official from the Food and Drug Administration overruled front-line agency scientists to push through the sale of an imaging device for breast cancer after getting pressured by a Connecticut congressman, internal documents reveal. Andrew C. von Eschenbach, the agency's commissioner, has met with the nine scientists who released documents showing pressure from Rep. Christopher Shays (R-Conn.). Shays, who lost re-election in November, called an agency supervisor a year ago on behalf of Fujifilm Medical Systems, which is based in Stamford, Conn., in Shays's former district. In the documents, Shays is referred to as "Congressman Fuji." — New York Times

Longwall Mining Negatively Impacting Some Rural Areas » A yearlong investigation into the social and environmental impacts of longwall mining found how such "clean coal" methods have literally sucked surface and ground water into the earth, disrupting aquifiers. Residents of Northern Appalachia, in southwestern Pennsylvania, where six of the country's top 25 longwall mines reside, say they have had to sacrifice their way of life in order to accommodate the mining activities. "It's like living through an earthquake that happens in slow motion," one resident said. — Center for Public Integrity

AP: Blagojevich Tapped Firms With State Contracts » Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich raised at least $80,000 from firms with state road contracts last summer and fall — including $10,000 the day after the governor announced a $1.8 billion tollway project mentioned in criminal charges against him, records show. A review of Blagojevich campaign contributions from last summer and fall shows donations from 15 firms that hold millions of dollars in contracts from the state. — Associated Press

By Derek Kravitz |  January 16, 2009; 7:28 PM ET Top Picks
Previous: Winds of Change for Cape Cod? | Next: Bush's Legacy: Financial Crisis

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