Spinning (Yarn) With The Pearl

The best part of the Washington Wizards' long delay in retiring Earl Monroe's number was that it allowed a new generation of basketball fans - myself included - to put his career in proper perspective.

I won't front. I'm way too young to have seen the man play. I was still in pre-school when he retired from basketball in 1980. I knew he was one of the 50 Greatest. I was always familiar with "Earl The Pearl." Some names have a certain staying power, some legends have a way of expanding through the years. I find it amusing that his given first name is Vernon. Can you imagine what his nickname would've been then? Burnin'? Turnin'? Money Earnin'?


Pearl flashing the pearly whites before his shining moment - finally. (Photo by Ned Dishman/NBAE via Getty Images)

I've seen highlights of him. But from listening to people who had the opportunity to watch him or play with and against him, you realize that grainy video footage doesn't do the man justice. Wil Haygood's story in the Style section last week made that obvious for me. Monroe moved somewhat awkwardly, with stutter steps and hesitations, and made inexplicable, improvised moves that even he couldn't break down without going back and watching the film.

The first time I really gained an appreciation of the man was when I watched Spike Lee's movie, "He Got Game," when Jake Shuttlesworth (Denzel Washington's character) explained to his son (played by Ray Allen) why he named him, "Jesus." It was a poignant moment that really brought the film together for me, because before then, I thought the name Jesus Shuttlesworth was just ridiculous.

But the Wizards went through the long overdue process of retiring Monroe's jersey last night, making him the 11th player to have his jersey retired by two teams, and I got the opportunity to sit down with the man for a few minutes before the game. I hated that there were time constraints - I had some crazy deadlines that night but you don't care - because the man had so much yard to spin.

I wasn't able to get into everything we talked about in an 18-inch article, but there were some interesting stories he shared that I felt shouldn't be buried in my notebook. I'll leave you a few:

Monroe didn't start playing basketball until he was 14 and didn't make the varsity team at Bartram High in Philadelphia until he was a junior.
Monroe told me that he was drawn to baseball and soccer growing up, and it took him awhile before he felt comfortable on the court. He said when he started, he was about 6-foot-3, 160 pounds and had limited coordination.
"I would go out there and get beat," Monroe said. "Everybody else had been playing awhile. Everybody was beating me."
Monroe said that when he went home to complain to his mother, she handed him a notebook and told him to write down every player he couldn't beat. "My notebook was full," Monroe said, adding that he had about "40 or 50" names on his list. One by one, he scratched them off. He said he felt like the best player in the city when he was able to strike his pencil through the last name.
"George Mack. He played at North Carolina A&T," Monroe said about Mack, who was later drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers. That list "started me off to being who I wound up being."

Monroe thought about entering professional basketball out of high school.
No, he couldn't enter the NBA. But as a senior in high school, Monroe had already become such a stud that people called him "Thomas Edison" because of the moves he would invent on the court. He started letting people know that he planned on playing in the American Basketball League, a short-lived rival to the NBA started by Harlem Globetrotters founder Abe Saperstein. The league, which included a team owned by George Steinbrenner, folded in 1963 before Monroe ever had a chance to play.

"Thank goodness it folded," Monroe said, laughing. "I certainly wasn't ready."

He took a year off to work in a knitting room - not a misprint - before having a storied career at Winston-Salem State College. The Bullets nabbed him with the No. 2 pick in 1967.


Black Jesus vs. The Big O. Don't you wish you were there for this one? Wow. (Photo by Vernon Biever/Getty Images)

Even as a Knick, Monroe considered himself a Bullet
Monroe had his number retired by the Knicks in 1986, played nine of his 13 seasons in New York and won his lone championship there in 1973. But when he was inducted in the NBA Hall of Fame in 1990, he insisted on being a Bullet. He said most people still remember him as a Bullet, not a Knick. "I guess that's because I scored as many points in four years here as I did in nine years in New York," Monroe said with a laugh. (I went and checked the numbers. Monroe scored 7,775 points as a Bullet, averaging 23.7 points per game. He scored 9,679 as a Knick, averaging 16.2.)

Monroe's exit from the Bullets in 1971 was quite contentious - he wanted more money and considered playing in the ABA for the Indiana Pacers - and he still has some regrets about what could've been. It has been often written how playing for the Knicks and Red Holzman sterilized his free-wheeling, one-on-one artistry. The initial adjustment to playing for the Knicks was difficult, Monroe said.

"Essentially, this was my team and I was going to a team that was Walt Frazier's team," Monroe said. "It was very tough. Especially when the game started getting close. Those times in the game when you were used to taking over - it took me a while to adjust to it. For a guy who was a scorer most of his career, I had to go home and make excuses to my guys at home why I wasn't scoring. In the end, it kind of worked itself out."

When discussing his lone championship season, Monroe then slipped this tidbit of info. "I don't know if I should say this, but when we did beat the Bullets in '73 and we went on to win a championship, it was the fact of us starting to go freelance as opposed to calling plays," Monroe said. "Clyde would freelance and I would freelance and that's really how we beat them."

By Michael Lee |  December 2, 2007; 7:59 PM ET
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Comments

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Sweet story. Thanks so much, ML.

Posted by: iceberg | December 2, 2007 10:24 PM

Actually DCMan, we all kow that you do read his blog.

From a previous Arenas blog:

"I'm a trend setter, people. I don't want other shoe companies to try to jack my style now. My swag is too phenomenal. If any other basketball player out there wants to compete with my shoes, go ahead, we can have a 50 and Kanye right here. We can start it up, baby. I?ll be the bad guy. We can have a sneaker war."

And here is DC's response on the ESPN Wizards forum. BTW, he goes under clewiston88. I'm sure he'll try to say that he isnt clewiston or that I'm not a psychic so I couldnt possibly know who he is...but again, most of us here know you're a fake so there's no point denying it.

Oh, here's his quote:

"There is no doubt who said it. It is the same guy who, at times lets his mouth hurt his ball club.

In this instance though, it is just him begging for attention. Of course he wouls like to get a Kanye/50 battle going with someone. He needs the help. He would only be so lucky if a guy like Bron Bron would throw him a bone like that."

http://boards.espn.go.com/boards/mb/mb?sport=nba&id=was&tid=1486581

Quit lying kid, you're just embarassing yourself even more.

Posted by: Drexler | December 2, 2007 11:01 PM

Sorry, this is a repost from the last entry. But I'll happily take any chance to expose DC's stupidity.

Posted by: Drexler | December 2, 2007 11:02 PM

What is this? Can we please focus on this article? Who cares about somebody who bashes the Wizards/Gilbert all the time and fills this blog with negative posts. This should be about Earl The Pearl. Can we quit attacking each other and focus on what's being written here? Thanks. Go Black Jesus and the Bullets!

Posted by: Frustrated reader | December 2, 2007 11:37 PM

Those old slow-mo film clips of the Pearl don't really convey how startlingly quick he was live, but they do reveal something that I think is amazing: Unlike the guys today, he did his famous spin dribble without carrying the ball, not even a little bit.

Posted by: John Brisker | December 2, 2007 11:56 PM

Great article, thanks.

And also thanks for the link to the Style story. This bit reminded me of Gilbert: "On visits back home to Columbus, he'd regale us with stories about the Pearl that were still floating across the gyms and playgrounds long after Monroe had departed, such as how in one game the Pearl launched a jumper deep in the corner as time expired only to fade into the locker room before the ball sailed through the net. "

Are the Pearl and Gilbert alike in terms of personality?

Posted by: amalg | December 3, 2007 12:33 AM

I had the pleasure of watching Pearl's entire career professionally.
I was a Bullet fanatic when Earl was drafted out of Winston Salem.
He was magical from the beginning.
His spin moves, while unique were also a bit awkward. He was not smooth like Clyde, but rather stop and go, then spin all in a whirling dervish. He was the first I saw to see the whole floor and look off his passes, since Cousy, who was also a bit awkward.
Those thrilling and pulsating Bullet Knick playoff encounters, were the best pure sporting events that I ever saw. The intensity and quality of competition were unrivaled. Even though the Knicks seemed to always prevail, with one exception, the competition and skill levels of the 2 teams was amazing.
It made me an NBA fan for life, and I still laugh when friends insist that college ball is better than the NBA. No way, no how, never.
NBA is the best sport ever, with the most competitive, talented and spirited athletes ever.
Thank you "Pearl" for the memories and the anticipation of what was to come.

Posted by: mricklen | December 3, 2007 1:09 AM

What I remember about The Pearl is that the ball was like a yo-yo in his hands. He could control the ball like no other, and then he'd add that spin move. No one could guard him.

Posted by: Anonymous | December 3, 2007 1:34 AM

I agree with the comment that Earl the Pearl was not "smooth" like Walt Frazier, which is probably why they were such an effectiuve counterpoint guard tandem for the Knicks.

His game was based on purposive and deceptively awkward-looking movement, incredible changes of pace, court vision, and control over the ball. And an amazing variety of shots in the pre-three point era.

When I watched Bullet or Knick games with my Dad, he would always say, "He's travelling. Why don't they call it?" I would say, "Dad he is not travelling, he is just doing more things with the ball and his body at one time than any other player you have ever seen."

Some people called his movement "herky-jerky" but that term does not give the Pearl suffcient credit as an artist, which he truly was.

Posted by: khrabb | December 3, 2007 3:25 AM

I was a little disappointed at the clips they showed of the Pearl during the Wiz tribute. I've seen him do a lot of things with the ball that were much more exciting than what they showed. If you show those clips to someone who'd never seen him play, they'd look pretty ordinary. The Pearl was the truth.

Posted by: mark | December 3, 2007 7:34 AM

Drexler, we're aware of Clewiston. Thanks for the heads up. The '88' is probably his birth year...which would explain a lot of things. Not all 19 year olds are immature but some...

Posted by: Anonymous | December 3, 2007 7:36 AM

Drex: He won't read this thread. He has no class. He only goes back a couple of years.
You know the nouveau chumps.

He doesn't have a kool call sign like Earl the Pearl. Clewiston. pssst.

Posted by: Victor | December 3, 2007 7:45 AM

"Butler and Jamison both are averaging more than 39 minutes per game and they are the only teammates to rank in the top 10 in minutes played"
I know we are shorthanded, but we're gonna wear these guys out at this pace. Even if it means taking a loss or two early in the season while the subs get experience, we need to cut back on these minutes. Either we do it now or we risk losing one or both for good. Our subs are adequate if we play them properly. It was good to see McGuire out there even for just a few.
I know Mason has taken a lot of heat on this board lately but he played very well the other night. When he did not have the ball in his hand and just spotted up, he made his shots. He also played defense on the PG and did an adequate job staying in front of his man. He's not going to create on offense like AD but he's not as bad as some here think he is. I know it's just one game but if we put him in a position to succeed, he should be good enough to spell AD for 15 minutes a game.

Posted by: freedom0125 | December 3, 2007 7:52 AM

Great to see the Wizards give Earl Monroe the long overdue honor of having his number retired.

The old Baltimore Civic Center had been as dead as Philly was the other night before "The Pearl arrived. Watching and listening to the clips of Earl the other night reminded me of another old Bullets fixture.

Anybody else on here remember "Dancing Harry"? Back in the days before cheerlaeders and dance numbers they'd just play music at time outs. The story was the Harry was just a guy that got up out of the stands at the old Civic Center and started dancing on the court one time.

The fans went wild, so Abe didn't throw him out and they made him part of the show.He has hipper then those corny little dogs with the Cannon they used to have.

It caught on and he became a regular. When the Pearl got traded to NY Harry followed him up there. Later I think he showed up at different places and would be part of the show, I remember seeing him on TV one time at Indiana. I guess he was an early Free Agent.

Wes, Earl and Gus "HoneyComb" Johnson played some great ball and turned the dump that they called the Civic Center into a happening place. Back in those days they used to have quite a "Brown Bottle in a Bag" crowd. Earl would make a move or Gus would throw down a slam and the place would go crazy.

Not many corporate seats back then, can't recall seeing many suits. Seats were cheap and Abe was holding on by his teeth in those days, the whole league was. But guys like Earl "The Pearl" started to pack em in.

Seeing the Pearl and his family at the phone booth reminded me of the pure joy that he played with. The guy still really seems to love life and seemed to really enjoy the honor.

And I'd agree he's still the only guy that I've ever seen do that spin move of his that didn't carry the ball. these guys have tried for years and can't duplicate it.

Section 101 great story, with all the joy of seeing "The Pearl" we've seen the Redskins go through a really tough time in front of us all. Those guys will be spent by the end of today, can't imagine how they'll bury their teammate and be ready to play by Thursday.

Rest in Peace Shawn Taylor.

Posted by: GM | December 3, 2007 8:34 AM

And great story Micheal, Had to be a pleasure getting to meet and interview "The Pearl"!

Posted by: GM | December 3, 2007 8:50 AM

Mike Lee! Another fantastic article. What can one say? You're the best.

Thanks so much for stopping in to enlighten us with your very timely articles.

Posted by: Robin | December 3, 2007 9:50 AM

fredom0123? One game does not a player make. One game. And the game is on his home court...he's lost on the road. What good is that? And come to think of it..he's terrible at home as well. This was "one game" and against a team missing their primary players.

From what it looked like to me? If EJ actually trusted this guy....He would have given AD a break in Philly. He never used Mason - period. It looks like EJ had a talk w/Mason or(being as blind as he is)may has gotten the message..he better earn playing time. Mac & Young are chompin at the bit to play. Jackin up 23 ft airballs & playin pure D league ball won't earn you anytime when they're in a crunch. Perfect example was PA. If RM was such a sharp shooter - in PA the others were sluggish...EJ never went to him. a sign right there - no trust. Both Thus this game. streaky at best - plus - we have no one else. I hate wasting ink even discussing Mason..a waste of money.

Posted by: Dave | December 3, 2007 10:05 AM

Earl Monroe deserves all the acclaim he is getting now. For sure, all those players like him, Wes Unseld, Clyde, etc. never made the moolah like today's players are. And unlike the owners like Abe, they did not have any shares of stock in the team that would grow. I hope the NBA's retirement plan is giving these guys something, even as a token. How about selling some Bullets Monroe shirts? That might make him some money.

Posted by: rgz | December 3, 2007 10:17 AM

LOL. such hate for Mason... I have to admit I focused on him for this one game and he had a good one. It might be an anomoly.

Posted by: freedom0125 | December 3, 2007 10:21 AM

Mason did play a solid game the other night and I thought the game planning put him in a better position to be successful.

The guy's the kind of player that needs to be put in a position to be successful, like so many are. He has struggled to adapt to a change in role after Gil went down.

Glad to see Jordan adapt the offense a little to make better use of him because right now he's all the Wizards have as a backup point. Daniels had to get a little rest on the second night off a back to back or they were doomed to wear down in the 4th.

I'd agree that Young and MacGuire seem to be chomping at the bit for playing time. Along with Pecherov and Blatche they will make a nice young core to build around.

Jordan is going to have to start to work at getting Butler and Jamison's minutes down a little bit or they're going to worn out by the second half. It's nice to see McGuire starting to get some minutes here and there I like what we're seeing from him.

The Wiz are going to need theses young guys to stay in the hunt.

Posted by: GM | December 3, 2007 10:46 AM

fredom0123? One game does not a player make. One game. And the game is on his home court...he's lost on the road. What good is that?

Posted by: Dave | December 3, 2007 10:05 AM


As for Roger Mason, although sometimes stats lie, it's pretty much a given that if you give a player more minutes, he becomes more productive.

Until Arenas went down, Mason was averaging 7 minutes per game.... and shooting horribly.

When he plays 15 minutes or more, his shooting percentage is up (44%). MORE IMPORTANTLY, with more minutes his 3-point percentage is up (43%). And therefore, his scoring average in games where he played 15 minutes or more is 10ppg.

The more minutes he gets, the more productive he becomes. As evidenced in the last game. He missed his first shot (a wide open look), committed a turn over, and a foul - all within the first 5 minutes he was in the game. In the next 20 minutes, he hit 6 of 10 shots (including three 3-pointers), grabbed a couple of rebounds, had 2 assists, and a steal.

Let's not get all 'Arvis' on Mason until he gets some kind of consistant playing time that we can make a reasoned and fair assessment.

Posted by: Rook | December 3, 2007 11:19 AM

Hey All, FYI ... here is a quote in the Cleveland Plain Dealer newspaper from Doc Rivers before they played Cleveland:

Boston coach Doc Rivers jokingly put on a sad face when reporters told him before the game that James was not going to play. Then he smiled.

"You've got to keep your guard up," he said. "Look at what Washington is doing right now without Gilbert [Arenas]. Teams win without their guys. They just seem to play with a purpose. But we can't be concerned whether he plays or not. I don't really care, honestly."

Its nice to know that the wiz are getting respect.

Posted by: 2cents4wiz | December 3, 2007 11:52 AM

Some players just have to be put on the court in a position to succeed. Since Rook brought up Jarvis Hayes, that was a classic case of a guy being pressed into service playing a position he really couldn't handle last year.

Early last year when Ruffin, Thomas and even Haywood were all down before Songalia made it back Hayes was playing quite a bit of power forward. To me it seemed he lost his confidence and really struggled.

Actually at the end of last year when he was only asked to play the two and 3 position he started to play more solidly. Some were on here saying that we should have brought him back instead of Mason a while back. But he'd have never been able to handle backup point minutes like Mason is being asked to play now.

Sometimes an 11th or 12th man is being kept around over other choices because he can backup two or three positions. Because normally that guy is only going to be asked to fill in minor minutes.

Since Gil's gone down it might look like now the Wiz should have kept a pure point on the roster. But when the final cuts were being made Mason was being looked at for his ability to back up at three positions. And the fact that he had a decent 3 point shot and is a servicable defender.

The positive I saw out of the game the other night is that Jordan seems to be adapting to the players that he has to work with and is making adjustments.

Some tough home games ahead in the next few games.

Posted by: GM | December 3, 2007 1:00 PM

The other reason Mason was likely kept around was the familiarity factor. He knew the team, he knew the offense, he knew what the coaches wanted. He could be pressed into service when needed without any concern for his learning curve. The same couldn't be said of someone like Brian Chase. And the learning curve for a rookie would be steeper at PG than any other position.

Mason isn't a deadeye gunner like Reggie Miller or Ray Allen. He's a streak shooter, more in the mode of Juan Dixon. But, unlike Dixon, his size defensively and ability to handle the ball makes him a bit less of a liability when his shot's not falling.

Posted by: kalorama | December 3, 2007 1:10 PM

Nice article Mike!

On another subject, did anyone notice that Abe looked pretty bad during the ceremony Saturday night? Is he sick? Ivan or Mike can you guys shed any light on this?

Big game on Wednesday night, go Wiz!

Posted by: DC Juan | December 3, 2007 1:12 PM

Is Nick Young still a bust?

Just checkin'

Posted by: kalorama | December 3, 2007 1:17 PM

PS that picture of Earl Monroe and Oscar Robertson is terrific. What impressed me is that while most players of that era were not into working out, nor was exrecise technology then what it is today, these guys had the same type of well defined bodies that are the norm today.

Posted by: khrabb | December 3, 2007 1:51 PM

GM, that was a fantastic post about the old days in Baltimore. I'd completely forgotten about Dancing Harry.

That reminds me of living in Pittsburgh when they had an ABA team in the late 1960s. You could go up to the Civic Arena and shell out a few bucks to sit with a couple of hundred other hoops junkies and rowdy drunks to watch Connie Hawkins, who was at the time still banned by the NBA, make those jaw-dropping moves to the hoop.

Posted by: John Brisker | December 3, 2007 1:52 PM

Take a look at nbablogs.info Almost all NBA blogs from each team.

Posted by: nbablogs | December 3, 2007 3:19 PM

Vote Caron and Antawn to the All Star game:

http://www.nba.com/allstar2008/asb/eng/ballot.html

Posted by: Rook | December 3, 2007 3:38 PM

Yeah John, I was still in school in those days, my older brother and some of his friends used to take me along down to the Civic Center for games. I think we could get in the upper deck for 2 bucks.

The place wasn't that full, by half time even the ushers had moved down to the lower level. I think they used to open the doors to whinos and some of the "ladies" from the block that come in just to get warm. It was some crazy crowd to be hanging out with when you were a 12-14 year old kid fresh off the farm!

But it was one hell of alot of fun, I've never seen anything else like it. Another thing about "The Pearl". Players talk trash all the time, but Earl, he'd hold running conversations with people in the stands while he played.

The guy had fantastic eyes, he saw everything that went on on the court and I think half of what went on in the stands. He'd even compliment some of the ladies on their outfits while he played.

Earl made sure everybody was having a good time back in the old Baltimore days. He was the closest thing to a Meadowlark Lemon I've ever seen in the NBA.

But don't get me wrong he was a competitor, those old Knick/Bullets duels were some of the most intense games I've ever seen. There's nothing like those old NBA/ABA days of the late 60' and early 70's.

Posted by: GM | December 3, 2007 3:43 PM

DC Juan said: "On another subject, did anyone notice that Abe looked pretty bad during the ceremony Saturday night? Is he sick?"

He's 84 years old.

Posted by: 2cents4wiz | December 3, 2007 4:38 PM

Is Nick Young still a bust?
Just checkin'

Posted by: kalorama | December 3, 2007 01:17 PM


No, but you're still a boob.

Posted by: Anonymous | December 3, 2007 4:51 PM

John Brisker- I also saw the Hawk play in Pittsburgh in the 60's for both the Pittsburgh Rens of the ABL and then the Pittsburgh Pipers of the ABA. They actually won the championship and then were moved to Minnesota. Didn;t a John Brisker play for the Pipers?
The Hawk was something special in those days.

Posted by: arnie | December 3, 2007 4:56 PM

GM, MRicklen...good to see other oldtimers like me who actually remember the Peal's style. Pearl, Honeybomb, Wes, Jack Marin, Kevin Loughery, Freddy Carter! battling Clyde, Dick Barnett, Willis Reed, Dave Debushure, Bill Bradley, John Lucas, Dick Stalworth, Mike Rierdon...Wow what memories the 70's gave us!

For me, as a kid from the streets of Anacostia and Lanham, the late 60's was when my childhood love for baseball and the Senators quickly eroded as I became intrigued by the NBA game and the entertaining team up in Baltimore.

Was good the other night to see DMac get some time and Mason hit some shots. Was good to see the continued intensity of the players. Caron is amazing and I didn't even know about that injury story at halftime. But the bottom line is that we should have won. And again I think I saw some bad usage of smallball. Songalia as a center continues to mean folks drive the lane and dunk. We need to stop using him there. Oh yeah, I forgot the party line, he is a mismatch against other 5's on the offensive end. When will we learn?

Posted by: BmoreRev | December 3, 2007 5:19 PM

Anybody figure out how to catch TV ZVEZDA online? Vladimir Veremeenko plays tomorrow I believe at 230pm ET on tape delay. Both teams are 4-0 (Khimki vs. Pamesa Valencia) but I have no idea of the level of play. Can anybody fill in any details, i.e. how you get the game on the internet or the skill level of the players in the league? Thanks in advance

Posted by: Anonymous | December 3, 2007 5:22 PM

Amen to all the great stories about Earl. And watching all the ceremonies and interviews you could tell the man has still got some fire in the belly. I liked his comment when someone mentioned Gilbert breaking his old single-game scoring record, something to the effect of "Yeah, but we didn't have a 3-point line for some of those shots."

And my oh my would I love to catch some footage of Earl going against Oscar. I still think the Big O is one of the most underappreciated players in NBA history (along with the Pearl).

Posted by: Prazak | December 3, 2007 9:27 PM

And my oh my would I love to catch some footage of Earl going against Oscar. I still think the Big O is one of the most underappreciated players in NBA history (along with the Pearl).

Posted by: Prazak | December 3, 2007 09:27 PM

I agree. ESPN, TNT, etc. are missing out on a gold mine when they choose not to show classic NBA games. I would watch lmost nothing else on TV if these classic games wuld be on TV. Jabbar versus Chamberlain. Monroe as a Bullet against the Knick's Walt Frazier. Every game Dr. J ever played. Hellz yeah! Someone who has some connections needs to lobby for this. I hope all these old games are being digitized so that they don't fade away into dust to be lost forever.

Posted by: Anonymous | December 3, 2007 10:51 PM

Saw tomorrow article about Pesh. Love that guy and he will be much better than folks realize. I hope he gets some playing time later in the season. Given the shortage of centers/bigs, I could really see him getting 10 to 15/night. I would really like to see him used to play forward or center with Haywood or Blatche allowing for bigger lineups longer.

Posted by: Skeef | December 3, 2007 11:29 PM

I was great to see Earl get past big man like Wilt, Jabbar and Russel with his non rhythmic herky jerky moves. He fakes he spins and YES! Thanks John for bringing up the Hawk who went to my high school in Brooklyn. Jabbar once said that Connie was the best he'd seen and he'd seen them all. It's just a shame he was kept out of the NBA until late in his career. Even then he could be awsome!

Posted by: browneri | December 4, 2007 8:40 AM

>

Ah, It;s good to run into a fellow ABA aficionado. Brisker played for the Pittsburgh Condors (the former Pipers, after the franchise returned to Pittsburgh from Minnesota). Averaged an Arenas-like 29 ppg and 10 rpg in 70-71 and 28-and-9 the next year, when he wasn't getting into fistfights with other players. Also played briefly for Seattle in the NBA, before heading off to Uganda on some sort of mysterious business, where he disappeared in the late 1970s and hasn't been heard from since. (For more on that, http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/jamieson/180459_robert02.html)

The Pearl played in the NBA, but I think his unorthodox, freewheeling style (at least when he played for the Bullets) was pure ABA. He would probably have averaged 35 points a game in that league, considering the laissez-faire defense that most ABA teams played.

Posted by: John Brisker | December 4, 2007 11:58 AM

"Actually DCMan, we all kow that you do read his blog.

From a previous Arenas blog:

"I'm a trend setter, people. I don't want other shoe companies to try to jack my style now. My swag is too phenomenal. If any other basketball player out there wants to compete with my shoes, go ahead, we can have a 50 and Kanye right here. We can start it up, baby. I?ll be the bad guy. We can have a sneaker war."

And here is DC's response on the ESPN Wizards forum. BTW, he goes under clewiston88. I'm sure he'll try to say that he isnt clewiston or that I'm not a psychic so I couldnt possibly know who he is...but again, most of us here know you're a fake so there's no point denying it.

Oh, here's his quote:

"There is no doubt who said it. It is the same guy who, at times lets his mouth hurt his ball club.

In this instance though, it is just him begging for attention. Of course he wouls like to get a Kanye/50 battle going with someone. He needs the help. He would only be so lucky if a guy like Bron Bron would throw him a bone like that."

http://boards.espn.go.com/boards/mb/mb?sport=nba&id=was&tid=1486581

Quit lying kid, you're just embarassing yourself even more.

Posted by: Drexler | December 2, 2007 11:01 PM

Sorry, this is a repost from the last entry. But I'll happily take any chance to expose DC's stupidity.

Posted by: Drexler | December 2, 2007 11:02 PM "


BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

I hope you feel better about yourself after typing all that nonsense and stupidity....

Posted by: DC Man88 | December 4, 2007 11:09 PM

Actually, I feel just fine!

Posted by: Drexler | December 5, 2007 7:55 AM

"Actually, I feel just fine!

Posted by: Drexler | December 5, 2007 07:55 AM"

Great! That's all you can ask for.

Posted by: DC Man88 | December 5, 2007 9:25 AM

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