'There's Not Going to Be Another Michael Jordan'

Okay, here's Michael Jordan on Michael Jordan. He had a lot of interesting comments about his illustrious -- and now Hall of Fame -- career. No, I wasn't able to ask him about his time with the Washington Wizards. I had my hand up, but I don't think he would've said much regarding that period in his life. Anyway, this is what he had to say about himself.

Jordan on who "Mike" wanted to be like: My father probably. As you can see, I have a strong resemblance of him. I could not avoid that, without a doubt. If everybody wants to be like Mike, I'm pretty sure that starts with a haircut and suntan. I'm just happy to be myself, no matter how you look at it.

Jordan on his favorite basketball-related moment: That's so hard. That's like asking which one of your kids is your best kid. I've had so many great accomplishments, so many spectacular plays, big plays, game-winning shots. It's hard for me to pick one. If I started with 1982 at UNC, I could end with the shot in Utah or playing on the Dream Team, playing baseball. Although you guys don't consider that to be successful, I do. There are so many that it would be too difficult to pick out one. I'm just happy with everything.

Jordan on Chicago: That's my second home. I still live there. A lot of people don't think I still live there, but I do. For what they have given me, starting with Jonathan Kovler and Rod Thorn, who actually drafted me and took this kid who had never been to a big city at all. It was my first time being away from home. UNC from Wilmington is only 2.5 hours so I wasn't really away. But they took me in. And I had to earn my keep. They believed in me. I believed in them. That marriage lasted up until now. I will always, always have the deepest warmth for the city of Chicago and the support I've received from them. Other than what I've done, I can't give back any more. And I wouldn't ask for any more. I just want them to be able to remember the things I contributed to the city. And hopefully at some point down the road, they can have another championship just so they can compare the two. I wouldn't be standing here without their support without a doubt.

Jordan on what his late father, James, is thinking with him entering the Hall of Fame: He'd probably like to be standing here answering all your questions. He loved to speak for me. I think now he understands I'm a grown person. I've learned from him. He taught me well. If he was here today, I'm pretty sure he'd be living it up. And I think he'd be very proud of what I've done over my career and the choices that I've made, good and bad. It's like any father: He would probably have a face of elation and joy about things I've achieved in my career. He is here in spirit; I know that. When you see me, you see him, you see my mother and my brothers and sisters. I represent my whole family. I'm sure they're as proud as I am to be standing here in the Hall of Fame, enjoying this weekend.

Jordan on being called 'The Greatest': People say I was the greatest ever to play to the game. I cringe a little bit. I receive it as an opinion. But for me personally, I never played against Jerry West. I never played against Elgin Baylor. I never played against Wilt Chamberlain. Yeah, I would've loved to. But to say I'm better than those people is not for me to decide. I'm happy for the accomplishments and what people might say. But just to be a part of that debate is a privilege. But I would never give myself that type of accolade because I never competed against everybody in this Hall of Fame.

Jordan on his early years with the Bulls: When I first got to Chicago , they weren't doing well. The only way we could go was up. We couldn't go further down. I came from a prestigious university that was built on winning. So my attitude was to do whatever I could to help this team win. And the level of winning changed over the years. At that time winning for us was getting into the playoffs. And once we got into the playoffs, it was getting past the first round. And then it was getting to the Eastern Conference finals. And then getting to the Finals. That road happened over a period of time. We changed players, got better ones. Not to say the players when I first got there were bad. It's just I felt we needed chemistry to change and it did over a period of years. Management did a good job of changing the personnel. We went through three coaches. Doug Collins made a big impact of trying to put together a unique team that could compete for a championship. And then Phil came in and finished it off. And I think the city has to be proud. It's known as a hard-working environment and that happened with the Bulls. And once we got on top, we didn't want to relinquish that. I'm glad I was a part of that. I came in when there were 6,000 people in the stands. And most of the people that were coming towards the end of my career were there when the building was selling out every single night. I didn't want them to misunderstand where the Bulls came from and how hard the fight was to get there. So I was a little more animated and strong-voiced at the end. My teammates, if they can ever say anything about me, it was that we won. I remember having a conversation with Tex Winter, who was an unbelievable coach. I remember one game coming off the floor and I had scored like 20 points in a row to win the game. Tex reminded me there's no 'I' in team. I looked back and Tex and said, 'There's an 'I' in win. So which way do you want it?'

Jordan on Kobe Bryant and LeBron James: I see some resemblance. That's the evolution of basketball. When I was coming up, it was always comparisons to Dr. J. I was a big Walter Davis fan. Obviously you guys know my relationship with David Thompson. How can you not see a resemblance of yourself in Kobe Bryant and LeBron James? They're going to be fun. But don't be a rush to try to find the next Michael Jordan. There's not going to be another Michael Jordan. I say that in a way that times are different, the games are different, the desire to have that type of player is different. People are constantly trying to find the next Michael Jordan. First of all, you didn't find me. I just happened to come along. And the next thing you know, here I am. So you didn't have to find me. And you won't have to find that next person. It's going to happen. And I'm pretty sure you guys are going to recognize it. If you haven't already, in due time you'll know. And I think those guys have strong potential to be better than Michael Jordan down the road. They're going to create their own name, their own persona. So just give it time.

Jordan on Phil Jackson's influence: I haven't talked to Phil. You know he's one of those elusive guys. I don't know if he's Montana , South Dakota , North Dakota . I don't know where he is right now. Phil is one of those guys who when it was announced in March that I was going to be in the Hall of Fame, he already had a tape ready saying congratulations. And that was seven months ago. You never know what to expect from Phil. He challenged me. He challenged me at times I needed to be challenged. Mentally, he made me expand my outlook about the game, my perception of my teammates and what to expect from them. He put me in difficult positions in dealing with other players such as Dennis Rodman, but I was able to come around. That was a great learning experience for me. He's very deserving to be in the Hall of Fame. It doesn't surprise me that he's still successful with the Lakers. Because I think his makeup is taking personalities and blending those personalities together. The basketball talent was already there. I think you guys realize that before Phil got to the Lakers, they had the same personnel. It's amazing when he got there how successful that personnel became because he was able to blend those personalities together. That's his strong point. He did it for us. I would imagine he's going to continue doing it until he gets tired. He impacted my career. He helped me improve as a player and person.

Jordan on his 63-point game against the Boston Celtics: When you look at it up to that point, there were so many media guys saying, 'He's good. But he's not in the same class as Magic Johnson and Larry Bird.' After that game, I earned Larry Bird's respect. To me, that says I was on the right track in terms of becoming a better player. Not the points that I scored because at the end of the day, we lost the game. But he gave me the type of confidence that I needed at that level from a player. That to me was the biggest compliment I had to that time.

By Michael Lee |  September 11, 2009; 2:15 PM ET
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Comments

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you know what it is

Posted by: G-Man11 | September 11, 2009 2:40 PM

everybody else is last

Posted by: G-Man11 | September 11, 2009 2:41 PM

Never another? So you are saying anything MJ was involved with is only 99% from now on, he was the peak, thats it? MJ is end all to Human achievement in sports??
Go write some fiction, you seem to have a very vivid imagination.

Posted by: senex1 | September 11, 2009 4:00 PM

senex1: you misunderstood him. He is saying that there won't be another Michael Jordan because who ever the next great player will be will have his own name, his own personae, be his own person. He even said that that player may be better than Michael Jordan.

Keep reading and don't jump to so many conclusions- especially not until you're sure you've understood what was said in it's entirety- otherwise you're no better than a Republican, spinning hate.

Posted by: jistutz | September 11, 2009 7:23 PM

What is with the political commentary? Otherwise, you're no better than a Democrat spinning stupidity!!!!

Posted by: rphilli721 | September 11, 2009 8:59 PM

rphilli721: Simply making a comparison to something that everyone knows about and can understand. Everyone knows the Republicans spin hate and negativity, it's not fresh news. I was showing him how he was being by drawing a relationship between himself and something else.

Posted by: jistutz | September 12, 2009 1:59 AM

to jistutz: something can be said about the Democrats too and rphilli wrapped it up nicely. I'm no Republican, just a "realist" and the statement you made usually draws tit-for-tat arguments.

Posted by: Bullzards80 | September 12, 2009 11:18 AM

Now back to Basketball. Congrats to MJ, definitely the best ever and none of these crybabies today will ever touch his legacy. No one today can redefine the game like he does. LeBaby? Crybe Bryant? Nope.

Go Gil tho HOF for you baby show 'em!!

Posted by: Bullzards80 | September 12, 2009 11:20 AM

Don't jump to conclusions, don't jump your guns. Please read the article through. It is mostly a transcript of an interview.
There is a reason there are quotes around the title phrase "There's not going to be another Michael Jordan." If you read the whole article, it is quoting Michael Jordan himself when he is questioned about Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, etc. being model players as he himself is. And if you continue reading, you will understand that Michael Jordan's comment really means that there is no need to say anything like 'the next Michael Jordan'.

Posted by: rickgonz | September 12, 2009 12:00 PM

Oh and please press the PLAY button for the video.

Posted by: rickgonz | September 12, 2009 12:03 PM

rphilli721: Simply making a comparison to something that everyone knows about and can understand. Everyone knows the Republicans spin hate and negativity, it's not fresh news. I was showing him how he was being by drawing a relationship between himself and something else.

Posted by: jistutz | September 12, 2009 1:59 AM
____

Obviously, you're a simpleton. A drone with little of his own thinking and a slave to mindless smears without any basis. Neither Reps or Dems own any one category of good or bad and politicians in general are mostly self serving scum that no longer are in it for the good of the country. The constitution has been shat on for way too long now by both parties and it's time for a little constraint or else what made this country great is going to gradually disappear. And, that is a gov't for the people by the people. Not gov't for the careers and power of politicians or special interest groups. We've lost our way. Dems slightly more so than Reps. Have a nice day drone!

Posted by: rphilli721 | September 12, 2009 12:14 PM

Alright MJ - Congratulations! Loved watching you through the 90s.

Good luck on all your future endeavors and may none of them have anything to do with DC basketball!

Posted by: Blurred | September 12, 2009 4:52 PM

Posted by: Blurred | September 12, 2009 5:08 PM

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 12, 2009 7:23 PM

I have to agree with you DC, MJ's speech turned petty. Not much thanks for his teammates and having been a big fan of his for years, it was a little shocking some of the stories he brought up. Move on..

Posted by: ptp23 | September 12, 2009 9:11 PM

DCMAN-
Good to see we agree, finally.

Oh. And I finally got a job, so here's the buck 60 I owe you.

Posted by: Blurred | September 13, 2009 7:16 AM

"Oh. And I finally got a job, so here's the buck 60 I owe you.

Posted by: Blurred | September 13, 2009 7:16 AM "

I wouldn't even pick up $1.60 if I saw it on the sidewalk.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 13, 2009 7:45 AM

Since we're off topic, this is what you call a sore loser.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/09/12/AR2009091202650.html

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 13, 2009 7:52 AM

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 13, 2009 7:53 AM

Most times when one loose their temper, their actions most likely can be determined to be classless. So, your observation of what happened is correct and an obvious conclusion.

But, 88, clearly you are not insinuating that Serena Williams is classless, are you?

LarryInClintonMD.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 13, 2009 10:06 AM

There also will never another Chamberlain, Russell, The "Big O", "Clyde", "Earl the Pearl", Pistol Pete", "Dr. J", etc. That's one of the great things about pro basketball, the individuality of it's stars over the years never seems to fade.

Of all of the team sports, it's the one that is the most difficult to coach "the kid" out of it's stars. Everybody has his(or her) own unique style that is difficult to copy.

Jordan's comments about his exchange with Tex Winter was classic. Tex, the coach, said to Jordan, after he had just scored 20 straight points to win a game, "There's no I in team". Jordan responded, "but there is one in WIN".

You can't coach a 9th inning homerun, a TD pass off a scramble, or a three pointer at the buzzer. Great coaches put great players in position to win. There are few championships won by a group of average players that got "coached up".

That's why Wizards fans better pray that Arenas can recapture his place as one of the top players in the league. In the last 40 yrs. you can count the number of NBA titles won by a team without a top 15 player in the league on one hand.

A good coach can take average players and weave their talents together to make the sum of their parts better then their individual talents. A great coach can do that, plus spur a great player on to be even greater.

The diffence in a good Coach and a great coach? Great players want to play for a great coach. Not many titles won without a great player and a great coach.

15 or 20 years from now, if we're seeing Flip and Arenas getting one of those jackets then we'll know this Wizards' era was a success...
GM

Posted by: flohrtv | September 13, 2009 11:11 AM

"Most times when one loose their temper, their actions most likely can be determined to be classless. So, your observation of what happened is correct and an obvious conclusion.

But, 88, clearly you are not insinuating that Serena Williams is classless, are you?

LarryInClintonMD.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 13, 2009 10:06 AM "

She is classless....the funny thing is she said that her temper used to be worse.

And, during the press conference, she didn't apologize, and has yet to.

It's one thing to shout obscenities, but to threaten someone is ridiculous, and then to backtrack. Whatever.

Take the "Nasty" from the Dynasty and leave center court now.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 13, 2009 8:30 PM

No justice, no peace.

Fine her, ban her, dismiss her.

http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news?slug=ro-serenafine091309&prov=yhoo&type=lgns

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 13, 2009 9:32 PM

Amazing, with the things that come out of DCMan88's mouth on this board, that he would have the standing to call anyone classless -- unless you accept the "it takes one to know one" theory.

And given some of the things he's said over the years on matters relating to race, it's safe to say where he's coming from on the subject of Serena Williams.

Did anyone watch the Connors-Krickstein match from 1984 during yesterday's rain delay? Connors was right in the umpire's face, furious and full of profanity. Remember McEnroe's tirades? And think about what gets said to refs and umpires in other sports on a weekly basis.

Tennis has been so steeped in gentility and etiquette that people go apesh*t to see anger and profanity in the game. Serena was definitely out of bounds in saying she wanted to stuff a tennis ball down the linesman's throat. But at the same time it was unprecedented to have a linesman call a foot fault with the match on the line, there have been plenty of unsportsmanlike blowups at officials in tennis, and there are routinely far worse instances of unsportsmanlike conduct in other sports. So let's stop singling Serena out.

Posted by: Prazak | September 13, 2009 9:38 PM

"Amazing, with the things that come out of DCMan88's mouth on this board, that he would have the standing to call anyone classless -- unless you accept the "it takes one to know one" theory.

And given some of the things he's said over the years on matters relating to race, it's safe to say where he's coming from on the subject of Serena Williams.

Did anyone watch the Connors-Krickstein match from 1984 during yesterday's rain delay? Connors was right in the umpire's face, furious and full of profanity. Remember McEnroe's tirades? And think about what gets said to refs and umpires in other sports on a weekly basis.

Tennis has been so steeped in gentility and etiquette that people go apesh*t to see anger and profanity in the game. Serena was definitely out of bounds in saying she wanted to stuff a tennis ball down the linesman's throat. But at the same time it was unprecedented to have a linesman call a foot fault with the match on the line, there have been plenty of unsportsmanlike blowups at officials in tennis, and there are routinely far worse instances of unsportsmanlike conduct in other sports. So let's stop singling Serena out.

Posted by: Prazak | September 13, 2009 9:38 PM "

Gosh, I didn't know that you raised me on the same pedestal as you have Serena Williams on. When did I also become a role model for all little kids out there because of my athletic prowess? When did I accept sponsor monies for all the little kids and fans buying my shoes and my merchandise?

Your argument is weak.

Whether I post it, or someone else posts it, it doesn't change the fact that Serena Williams is classless for threatening a judge.

Sure, they were crass, but I didn't hear about Connors or McEnroe threatening to physically hurt someone.

If a foot fault is not a rule, then it should be removed from the rule book. Otherwise, all bets are off.

Somebody needs to fine and suspend Serena, and while they're at it, administer a gender test. Being built like a linebacker is not normal for "ladies" tennis.

Tomorrow, Obama will invite Serena and the lines judge to the white house for tea and cookies.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 13, 2009 10:50 PM

I can still remember that chair flying across the basketball floor from being thrown by a out of control basketball coach or the time when he put his hands around the throat of one of his players and this same coach is or will be a Hall of Famer.

So DCMan88, based on your criteria, about half the people who are involved in sports are classless.

Go figure!

LarryInClintonMD.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 14, 2009 2:04 AM

And not calling foot faults when the match is clearly on the line is like not calling obvious fouls in basketball when the game is clearly on the line.

And yeah Serena went off on the linesman for doing it, but that call would have never been made against any other tennis great, except maybe uh' uh' Venus Williams.

Get a grip DCMan88. The WTA will handle Serena appropriately, and also you will not see anymore not so obvious footfaults being called when the match is clearly on the line either.

And how many men have you seen in sports lose there temper and act downright classless that you have called out to be a classless person.

This says two things about you, true or not. You figure them out smart one.

LarryInClintonMD.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 14, 2009 2:23 AM

In BOTH cases we are discussing here--Serena's embarrassing blow up and MJ's embarrassing speech--we see one thing with clarity: character revealed.

First MJ: I've never heard a more sad and disappointing HOF entrance speech (in any sport), have any of you? Attacking, petty, defensive, vicious and insecure. At a point in his life when he should be comfortable and secure with his body of work on the court (simply the best ever in most people's minds---including mine), he is still calling people out for past "slights." Let. It. Go. You embarrassed yourself (and probably, if he were still here, your father) MJ.

I loved the article by a writer on Yahoo: http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news;_ylt=AivDXrUL1KS_aaTkv.LyXPl0fNdF?slug=aw-jordanhall091209&prov=yhoo&type=lgns )

People (in the public spotlight or not) often do things that reveal their character. And though I don't know MJ or Serena, I do however absolutely know a bit more about what kind of person each is, and the picture isn't pretty.

Posted by: psdfx | September 14, 2009 7:34 AM

Why do people hold other people to a different standard than they hold themselves? I thought we all have character flaws. This country was built on the character flaws of people since Plymouth Rock. But people want to focus on Serena and MJ!, why is that?

Posted by: G-Man11 | September 14, 2009 8:56 AM

I listened to MJ's speech and I came away feeling the same way I always do from practically all Hall of Fame speeches.

Its like they all miss something and they never live up to my expectations. Robinson's speech was too short and though he said the right things, I did not get a feeling of completeness from his words.

V. Stringer slighted unintentionally women, whom she was undoubtebly trying to praise in profiling her plight.

John Stockton's speech was too self depreciating and his assist accomplishment is tremendous. If you had just rolled from under a rock, you would not have known why he was elected to the HoF from his speech.

The point is I have watched these HoF speeches a long time and it is hard to get it right.

What you saw from Michael is why he has been labeled the best NBA player. I would have liked for his speech to be different too. But... I enjoyed his speech the best, because you knew that what he spoke was really how he felt and it was from his heart.

Sometimes when we see unabashed truthfulness we recoil because it did not fit our own simple perceptions.

Michael Jordans speech was no less than any of all the others, nor was it any greater.

Those that indicate otherwise are insecure and grandstanding at the expense of one of the greatest basketball players that has lived so far.

LarryInClintonMD.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 14, 2009 9:16 AM

psdfx, I've got to say, that the competitive fire that burned in MJ's soul and made him the best, seems to be consuming him now.

He didn't come accross as a guy that was real overcome with the joy of being in the HOF as so many others are.

Serena had one of those moments in life that nearly everyone has had. You know, where your temper gets the best of you, and you just melt down. Most of us are fortunate enough to never have it happen in public.

Tennis has had a long history of melt downs. Conners and McEnroe were two of the most famous repeat offenders. McEnroe's made some great commercials spoofing his own past anger.

Baseball managers, I've seen a few over the years that have really blew their fuses on a regular basis. Earl Weaver and Billy Martin are two that top the list.

Last year John McCain ran for President, he just joked at Ted Kennedy's Wake about his own legendary temper. Some of his great meltdowns were on C-Span, not that many were watching.

Funny how some are admired for their firey competitiveness, and others are regarded as some kind of outcasts.

88', the gender test stuff just goes completely over the top. But it doesn't surprise me, just your typical weekend behavior. And I don't ever remember any apology being aired by you here either for your sometimes boorish behavior.
GM


Posted by: flohrtv | September 14, 2009 9:57 AM

Tiger curses too much.
MJ does too much trash talking.
Ali is too arrogant.
Usain Bolt is a showboat.
Serena is classless.

The hating never ends. What she did was bad but no worse than any other athlete who blows up in the heat of the moment.
Personally, I'd pay 49.99 on pay per view to see if she actually COULD stuff the ball down the guys' throat.

Posted by: original_mark | September 14, 2009 11:20 AM

Much ado about nothing re: Serena. A hyper-competitive athlete in the heat of battle gets caught up in emotion. Big deal. Happens all the time. A grown woman cursing? God forbid. Can't have that.

Jordan, on the other hand, had weeks to think, consider, and write a speech, one that would reflect back on his career and what HoF enshrinement meant to him. Apparently it meant a chance to settle old scores that, in the minds of most people, had been settled years ago.

Posted by: kalo_rama | September 14, 2009 11:31 AM

DCMan, saying that your multiple incidents of classlessness on this board renders you a hypocrite for calling anyone else classless is hardly elevating you onto the same stage or holding you to the same standards as Serena.

Weak argument indeed.

The comparison, as others have also made ably here, is between Serena and other athletes. It's not between Serena, or any other athlete, and some anonymous serial troll on a blog.

Posted by: Prazak | September 14, 2009 12:03 PM

Keeping Mike quiet on current issues while playing was a really good idea on Falk's part. I listened to Mike's speech and it's surprising how stupid he sounded.
I guess when you can score at will, a mastery of basic English is not required. I didn't expect to hear a Harvard professor when he opens his mouth but subject-verb agreement would've be nice.
Then when the vitriol started pouring out, I was even more surprised. HOF speeches are for giving thanks and acknowledging those who helped you get there, I thought. Guess not!

Posted by: original_mark | September 14, 2009 12:09 PM

And Larry, you're absolutely right: that foot fault call was nothing like a touch foul being called at the end of regulation in a basketball game. Even close-up slow-motion camera shots after the fact couldn't conclusively demonstrate a foot fault. So how is it that someone sitting that far away could see it with enough assurance to call it at such a decisive moment in a hard-fought match? She couldn't possibly have seen it, and yet she called it.

You're darn right a line judge wouldn't have the nerve to make that call against Federer or Nadal or Sharapova. So why make it against Serena? You have to think Serena suspected the answer and you have to imagine that suspicion animated a lot of the anger that came pouring out.

Posted by: Prazak | September 14, 2009 12:16 PM

the more things change(obama), the more things remain the same.

Posted by: G-Man11 | September 14, 2009 12:34 PM

ugh, that speech was terrible and reminded me of why I could never stand Jordan as a player, GM, or person.

Great article on what an a-ss jordan is...

http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news;_ylt=Aq9l8E9NIMOguXEe3n_0pjS8vLYF?slug=aw-jordanhall091209&prov=yhoo&type=lgns

Posted by: Berghead | September 14, 2009 12:56 PM

I think Kalo said it best here:

Much ado about nothing re: Serena. A hyper-competitive athlete in the heat of battle gets caught up in emotion. Big deal. Happens all the time. A grown woman cursing? God forbid. Can't have that.

Jordan, on the other hand, had weeks to think, consider, and write a speech, one that would reflect back on his career and what HoF enshrinement meant to him. Apparently it meant a chance to settle old scores that, in the minds of most people, had been settled years ago.

Posted by: kalo_rama | September 14, 2009 11:31 AM

I can certainly admire Jordan's body of work as a basketball player and still wouldn't want him to run my company.

All the stories about him finding motivation in perceived slights and then this indicate to me that he is still competing. The question is with what is he competing and for what?

I don't know why we (the collective "we" as in sports fans) continue to expect that our sports idols would have personality traits we find admirable, also. Some do, some don't.

Posted by: Blurred | September 14, 2009 1:02 PM

"Somebody needs to fine and suspend Serena, and while they're at it, administer a gender test. Being built like a linebacker is not normal for "ladies" tennis. posted by dcman"

Serena Williams? That's all girl.

Posted by: Samson151 | September 14, 2009 2:05 PM

From Wikipedia:

"Venus Williams, Lindsay Davenport, Dinara Safina and Maria Sharapova are successful tall players on the women's side, all measuring 1.85 m (6'1") or taller."

I know there is more than height involved to be "built like a linebaker," but to say she is not "normal for ladies tennis" is simply uninformed.

Posted by: Blurred | September 14, 2009 3:12 PM

Not many Artie Donovan's amoung today's top athletes.

It's a totally different world that world class athletes live in today. Many are identified early and are treated a class apart from their peers from Pee Wee sports until their body can't perform at a top level any more.

The stories out of Bulls and then Wizards' practices about MJ sure clashed with the "I Want To Be Like Mike" image that Falk was able to maintain for years.

The MJ from the Nike commercials could be mean as a snake to those around him. Falk did a fantastic job of keeping MJ's image and his market value safe from MJ.

When Mike retired the second time, the very public dance he did with Bob Johnson before he met with Abe was well reported. It sure appeared that he planned to strong arm old Abe, apparently he made Abe an offer that only took Abe 10 minutes to refuse.

The one story that Falk and Stern did a pretty good job of burying was MJ's involvement with Gambling leading up to and during the Bulls third title run.
When MJ "retired" to play baseball Stern left the inquiry die with it.

MJ came back a couple of years later and everybody was so happy to have him filling the stands again, that no one in basketball was going to bring up his association with Gambling interests while he was playing.

Got to agree with Kal, he had months, really years, to write that acceptance speech. Maybe the people at Nike and David Falk don't see the reason to protect the image anymore. Maybe MJ refuses to be "handled" like he once was.

The MJ shoes aeren't the meal ticket for others they once were. And some of MJ's public appearances haven't helped.

MJ showed up to judge the slam dunk contest, and came off as a sour puss when Howard did the "Superman" dunk which put a smile everybody's face, except the guy who smiled through the 80's and 90'.

MJ sat there stone faced and lowballed the score. Not quite the guy we were all supposed to want to be like.
GM

Posted by: flohrtv | September 14, 2009 4:14 PM

I found Stockton's speech to be a pleasant surprise. He never displayed much personality with the media (on those rare occasions when he spoke) during his playing days. But his speech displayed a nice touch of self-deprecating humor and humility. And choosing Isiah Thomas to present him was a classy move. The two were bitter enemies as players but, unlike Jordan, they seemed able to the past into proper perspective and appreciate each others' competitive spirit.

Posted by: kalo_rama | September 14, 2009 4:17 PM

Another perspective on Jordan's speech.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/halloffame09/columns/story?columnist=adande_ja&page=JordanSpeech-090914

Great line: "Jordan spoke from the heart. The thing is, his heart's as cold as liquid nitrogen."

Posted by: kalo_rama | September 14, 2009 4:20 PM

Alrighty then...enough about the middle aged has beens and lets talk about some guys in their 20's.

Any word on what Blatche, Young, Critt, McGee and Arenas are up to? How's DeShawn's back?

Posted by: Blurred | September 14, 2009 5:01 PM

Michael's speech was straight off the cuff. That was his mistake. When he said that he told his friends that he would just say thank you and leave it was evident then that he did not prepare wisely for what was proper to say.

He was guilty of not preparing properly for an important momentus event.

All that being said, I still liked his speech the best. It gave us a real insight about himself and what motivates him to this very day. He told us little stories unabashedly about himself and others that most would die to hear and know.

He trash talked and kicked dirt and let us know how he really felt. He could have talked about his experience in Washington, and I wished he had, but he chose not to.

I did hear a story once when the NBA were in labor union talks years ago and MJ was one of the players involved and Mr. Polin was also involved and while giving his point of view, it was reported that Michael told Mr. Polin to shut up and sit his old arse down.

Knowing that, it was quite surprising that MJ ever came to Washington, but it was Ted Leonsis that sold that deal to Abe in spite of MJ's and Mr. Polins past run in.

Michael choose to put those behind the scenes stories in his speech that us common folk might never know.

I thank him for that, even though he did not plan it well, for those stories are priceless.

LarryInClintonMD.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 14, 2009 5:05 PM

When & where does Wizzies training camp open?

Posted by: VBFan | September 14, 2009 5:10 PM

MJ sat there stone faced and lowballed the score. Not quite the guy we were all supposed to want to be like.
GM

Posted by: flohrtv | September 14, 2009 4:14 PM

So did Julius Irving and I believe Majic Johnson also.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 14, 2009 5:26 PM

"MJ sat there stone faced and lowballed the score. Not quite the guy we were all supposed to want to be like."
GM
Howard's a talented center with amazing hops but that slam dunk, cloak act belongs in a circus, which by the way, NBA All Star games are dangerously close to becoming.
I can see why Jordan didn't find it amusing. As for youthful emulation and worse adult idolatry of athletes, it is misguided albeit tempting when they are capable of doing the things Jordan could do on a basketball court. But that doesn't make them paragons of virtue to be held up as a role model by adults who should know better. Most great athletes have a highly developed skill set that involves coordination and physical abilities, it rarely includes a high level of emotional intelligence.

"And choosing Isiah Thomas to present him was a classy move."
-Kalorama
In this case not just classy but generous considering all the bad press Thomas has been accumulating.

Posted by: midlevex | September 14, 2009 5:55 PM

"So DCMan88, based on your criteria, about half the people who are involved in sports are classless.

Go figure!

LarryInClintonMD.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 14, 2009 2:04 AM "

Name 1/2 the people in sports who threatened to stick a f'n tennis ball down the judge's f'n throat while waiving a tennis racket at the judge.

And to think Serena said that she actually calmed down a lot. Must have popped too many prozacs to go with the red bull.

For instance, if a baseball player waved a bat in a threatening manner at an umpire, I'm sure he'd be fined and suspended.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 14, 2009 5:58 PM

A poster wrote:

I thought we all have character flaws.

Another wrote:

Serena had one of those moments in life that nearly everyone has had. You know, where your temper gets the best of you, and you just melt down. Most of us are fortunate enough to never have it happen in public.

Good points, on both counts. I've certainly had my share of ...moments... I'd rather have back.

That said, while I find the threatening of a judge to be reprehensible, the REAL problem was the inability to say "I blew it, I went over the line, and I apologize" afterwards. As bad as her explosion was, she had the opportunity to demonstrate humility and remorse and to show what it looks like to make a weak moment/failure right.

I tell my children all the time: we will all make mistakes---but people of character will recognize their mistakes, own them, and take responsibility for them. Serena clearly had no willingness/ability to do this afterward---did you SEE her non-apology? Then, sometime later in the evening somebody (her agent? father? sister?) must have gotten to her and helped her see how bad she'd look if she didn't offer a "real" apology, and boy was THAT believable...

(And Kalo, you and I seem to have vastly different values, which makes a disagreement ok. A grown woman cursing is ok. A professional athlete like Serena physically threatening a a judge? No. That's not ok. If you think it is much ado about nothing, that is your prerogative. I profoundly disagree. Personally threatening a judge is a far different thing than expressing frustration---even at a judge. I think Serena should be suspended.)

MJ is just a sad case of (as someone else pointed out) being consumed by his own competitiveness. He reminds me of a child. Many children who are involved in sports are hyper competitive, but have not learned to (a) give 100% on the field/court AND (b) accept the outcome with graciousness and class once the game is over... We don't expect a child to react maturely---but we do expect a 46 year old to do so. MJ not only never demonstrated the ability to lose with grace, he has now proven he doesn't know what it means to have won with grace.

Best ever? Probable. Worthy of respect as a man? Less so every time he opens his mouth.

Posted by: psdfx | September 14, 2009 7:00 PM

The last time I saw a "grown woman" act like a neanderthal like Serena was when I was channel surfing and came upon WWE....but then WWE is acting.

I don't watch enough WNBA to say that those women act a fool like Serena, but I'm pretty sure no woman has ever gone that far.

Somebody check for the adam's apple.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_y9O5dPEqMbU/SKG1nQjIKoI/AAAAAAAABXw/F2yoG-ZXfws/s400/serena2.jpg

http://images.fanpop.com/images/image_uploads/Serena-Williams-tennis-247737_400_510.jpg

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 14, 2009 8:07 PM

Homer loved it:


Michael Wilbon: Hi Everybody...Thanks for joining a late chat, necessitated by PTI airing two hours early today...I'm starting with this Michael Jordan question because his HOF speech has produced a TON of conversation. From all I've heard over the last three days it's straight down the middle, 50-50. Many people loved the speech (I did) and many hated it (like this reader)...You can read my column on Jordan's speech in Sunday's newspaper to get my take...I'll say this: Michael Jordan has been the most ruthless, most chip-on-the-shoulder competitor ever...and this is who he is. And after being asked for 25 years to be less corporate and less vanilla, Jordan let it go no Friday night. Michael Jordan didn't become the legend he is by being mannerly, though he is in another context...Take a look at Peter King's Monday Morning QB column and take a look at Adrian Wojnarowski's column on the Yahoo Sports site which is the opposite view...Open your mind and consider a lot factors...They're both great reads.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 14, 2009 8:24 PM

Michael Wilbon: I didn't like the "I wouldn't want to be you guys" comment to his children. But it was true that they've got the issue of going forward with being the children of Michael Jordan and will never be left alone. Raw...made us uncomfortable...still true. I wouldn't have done it. David Robinson wouldn't have done it; in fact, Robinson's comments to his children were so loving, so wonderful...But that's MJ. I have no problem accepting him for who he is, even if I'd have done it 180 degrees the other direction.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 14, 2009 8:31 PM

Greenfield, Mass.: Hi Mr. Wilbon If i had a fairy godmother, and was granted one wish (aside from world peace, of course), I would ask to be in Tiger's body this past Saturday, even for one hour. Just to feel that swing ...

Michael Wilbon: I love that wish...Me too.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 14, 2009 8:33 PM

Ease up on Serena. So she blew a gasket in a hard fought match on a piddling line call. Big deal.

Anybody old enough to remember the fabulous Giant pitcher Juan Marichal clubbing Johny Roseboro, the Dodger catcher, over the head repeatedly with his bat in a Giant-Dodger game in the mid-sixties?
A great East coast rivalry that moved out to the west coast.
Marichal was batting when he went after Roseboro; he'd brushed back, maybe plunked some Dodgers while on the mound but Sandy Koufax, the Dodger pitcher refused to retaliate.
Roseboro, a fiery competitor, took matters into his own hands when Marichal came to bat and on the toss back to Koufax, tried to bean Marichal a couple of times. Juan lost his cool and applied his Louisville Slugger repeatedly to Roseboro's head; both benches emptied into a mega brawl on the field.
Marichal was suspended for a few games and fined.
Not sure how it would all turn out today. After a law suit or two, years later, Roseboro and Marichal reconciled and became friends.

Posted by: midlevex | September 14, 2009 8:51 PM

Blurred

I have to agree with you....who cares but tar heel (larry)and bulls fans about what MJ says or does. This is the year the Wizards are supposed to be going for the gold!

Mike,

Give me some info on the Wizards...what happen to all of the questions people wrote you about? What's up with the medical staff?

Posted by: bulletsfan78 | September 14, 2009 10:49 PM

"Ease up on Serena. So she blew a gasket in a hard fought match on a piddling line call. Big deal.

Anybody old enough to remember the fabulous Giant pitcher Juan Marichal clubbing Johny Roseboro, the Dodger catcher, over the head repeatedly with his bat in a Giant-Dodger game in the mid-sixties?
A great East coast rivalry that moved out to the west coast.
Marichal was batting when he went after Roseboro; he'd brushed back, maybe plunked some Dodgers while on the mound but Sandy Koufax, the Dodger pitcher refused to retaliate.
Roseboro, a fiery competitor, took matters into his own hands when Marichal came to bat and on the toss back to Koufax, tried to bean Marichal a couple of times. Juan lost his cool and applied his Louisville Slugger repeatedly to Roseboro's head; both benches emptied into a mega brawl on the field.
Marichal was suspended for a few games and fined.
Not sure how it would all turn out today. After a law suit or two, years later, Roseboro and Marichal reconciled and became friends.

Posted by: midlevex | September 14, 2009 8:51 PM "

It's funny how people try to correlate a episode of a female athlete behaving badly (rare) with the many instances of male athletes behaving badly.

In this instance, we're talking about an incident that occured in the 1960's? Yeah, that's almost 50 years ago.

Sorry, it's not the same, especially in tennis.

And for those bringing up Connors, McEnroe, et all.....that's really a stretch since those dudes retired from the professional circuit a long time ago. McEnroe 17 years ago and Connors at 13 years ago.

BTW, this "hard fought" match wasn't so hard fought as Clijsters, a mom just returning from retirement was beating her.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 14, 2009 11:54 PM

DC Man, Pardon me for drifting off topic of your boring diatribe regarding Serena Williams. However when you and others start moralizing about tutu clad tennis players on a basketball blog currently focused on Michael Jordan I tend to drift.
You're entitled to your banal opinions of course, just try to keep them to yourself or find a tennis blog devoted to courtly etiquette to haunt.

Posted by: midlevex | September 15, 2009 5:06 AM

Aww! That Carolina Blue looks mighty good from here.

Keep up the good work Mike. Michael Lee that is.

Hey Michael, you write so well, man, you, you, you ain't no Tarheel are ya'. Any connections atall'.

LarryInClintonMD.

Posted by: LarryInClintonMD | September 15, 2009 7:47 AM

Enough about Serena. Whatever else you want to say about her, she was penalized the match point. You know what that equates to? Calling offensive goal tending in the final minute of a close game 7 of the NBA championships. Maybe she would have pulled out a stirring victory, maybe not. But the difference between being US Open champ and coming in 2nd place is $800,000.

That is quite a fine. But DCMAN is so rich he wouldn't mind.

Back to the Wizards, please.

Posted by: Blurred | September 15, 2009 7:56 AM

About Serena: c'mon, she threatened that little ref with bodily harm. That'll get you tossed in the NFL, let alone ladies' tennis. She needs to get suspended, too.

Losing the match counts for nothing; it was a prize she hadn't won anyway.

You can't threaten refs. Even if they do something terrible, like accidentally toss a flag in your eye (ask Orlando Brown).

Posted by: Samson151 | September 15, 2009 8:45 AM

when are people going to realize that DCman craves negative attention. He lives for it. That is why at every given opportunity he spouts off garbage trying to get responses, so he can respond. Look how many times he posted comments to this particular blog. It is so sad.

Posted by: G-Man11 | September 15, 2009 8:52 AM

"About Serena: c'mon, she threatened that little ref with bodily harm."
-Samson

Serena merely offered to force feed the line judge a tennis ball. It could've just been an awkward invitation to lunch.

Posted by: midlevex | September 15, 2009 9:19 AM

Since we aren't talking about the Wizards anymore has anyone read page 987 of the health care bill?

Posted by: bulletsfan78 | September 15, 2009 10:02 AM

"Since we aren't talking about the Wizards anymore has anyone read page 987 of the health care bill?Posted by: bulletsfan78"

You mean the reference to a fast-break on cost containment?

Posted by: Samson151 | September 15, 2009 10:43 AM

"About Serena: c'mon, she threatened that little ref with bodily harm. That'll get you tossed in the NFL, let alone ladies' tennis. She needs to get suspended, too.

Losing the match counts for nothing; it was a prize she hadn't won anyway.

You can't threaten refs. Even if they do something terrible, like accidentally toss a flag in your eye (ask Orlando Brown)."

All true. But then, no one is actually condoning what she did or disputing that that she deserves some penalty for it. People are simply making the point that, in the grand scheme of pro sports, an athlete losing his/her cool and blowing up at the official after being on the receiving end of a bad call is hardly uncommon and simply not that huge a deal.

Posted by: kalo_rama | September 15, 2009 10:48 AM

As for Wilbon backing Jordan:

Oh. What a surprise. I'm shocked. Shocked I say.

Posted by: kalo_rama | September 15, 2009 10:50 AM

i wish NY and AB had a lil bit of that "liquid nitrogen" heart that yall are complaining about MJ having. how many lies did he tell during the speech? or was he recounting his career as he saw it, highlighting moments that were special or important to him. maybe he revealed himself as cold and arrogant, but that's only disappointing to people who assumed he was something else. how many people of great stature and adulation are actually good people? Best Basketball player ever, that's why he's in the bball hall of fame, not up for nobel peace prize or any humanitarian award.

Posted by: lilhollywood10 | September 15, 2009 11:06 AM

Gilby's training video is up on teh Wizards' website.

http://www.nba.com/wizards/multimedia/arenas_090915.html

Doesn't show much, butt still pretty exciting to see. He's trim and has a real serious look in his eye.

Posted by: ManuteBogues | September 15, 2009 11:06 AM

"how many lies did he tell during the speech?"

Who knows? It's a confirmed fact (confirmed in the past by Jordan himself) that as a player he had a habit of manufacturing slights and insults, claiming people said things about him that they didn't actually say, in order to provide himself with motivation.

Posted by: kalo_rama | September 15, 2009 11:20 AM

And no one expects him to be a great humanitarian. But the most basic of social norms says it's reasonable to expect someone to show some graciousness when being honored or given a gift.

Even if they have to fake it.

Posted by: kalo_rama | September 15, 2009 11:22 AM

i wish NY and AB had a lil bit of that "liquid nitrogen" heart that yall are complaining about MJ having. - lilhollywood

I do too. I am not complaining about how that manifested itself on the court. I could only wish that Mcgee or one of the guys that you mention could get an ounce of what Jordan had gallons of. But still, he seems to be quite the DB as a person.

I'll pay (and have many times) to see someone like him on the court. But that's where the relationship should end.

Of course, I am sure he has no interest in hanging out with me either.

Posted by: Blurred | September 15, 2009 11:28 AM

And it looks like the Wiz have a pre-season game at VCU's arena on October 6, which is a Tuesday. I know they are holding their camp at VCU in Richmond again, so I would suppose that it would either be that week or the week preceding that.

Posted by: Blurred | September 15, 2009 11:46 AM

gil looks good, not as heavy

Posted by: lilhollywood10 | September 15, 2009 1:50 PM

Wizzies preseason game. 10/06/09

http://www.ticketmaster.com/event/0100432AAB5D81E5

Posted by: VBFan | September 15, 2009 1:51 PM

Gil looked like he had dropped about 20 lbs. since last year and had his quickness back in the video. Also, he wasn't wearing a new brace and it was good to hear from the legendary trainer Tim Grover (not a Wizards player or coach) that Agent Zero was ready to get back to being an elite player....Let's keep our fingers crossed.

Posted by: wizfan89 | September 15, 2009 3:04 PM

Somebody needs to fine and suspend Serena, and while they're at it, administer a gender test. Being built like a linebacker is not normal for "ladies" tennis.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 13, 2009 10:50 PM

If you think Serena is built like a linebacker, you either need vision correction, or you watch different football games than I do.

Posted by: rbpalmer | September 15, 2009 4:59 PM

"If you think Serena is built like a linebacker, you either need vision correction, or you watch different football games than I do.

Posted by: rbpalmer | September 15, 2009 4:59 PM "

If you don't think Serena is built like a linebacker, you either need vision correction, or you watch different football games than I do.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 15, 2009 6:07 PM

"when are people going to realize that DCman craves negative attention. He lives for it. That is why at every given opportunity he spouts off garbage trying to get responses, so he can respond. Look how many times he posted comments to this particular blog. It is so sad.

Posted by: G-Man11 | September 15, 2009 8:52 AM "

If my posting is sad, you reading my postings and then commenting on them is even worse.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 15, 2009 6:14 PM

"DC Man, Pardon me for drifting off topic of your boring diatribe regarding Serena Williams. However when you and others start moralizing about tutu clad tennis players on a basketball blog currently focused on Michael Jordan I tend to drift.
You're entitled to your banal opinions of course, just try to keep them to yourself or find a tennis blog devoted to courtly etiquette to haunt.

Posted by: midlevex | September 15, 2009 5:06 AM "

Unless you are the blog moderator...all your energy used to type this trash was wasted. Go take a nap.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 15, 2009 6:20 PM

A male professional athlete chewing out a game official....very common.

A female professional athlete going postal on a game official and threatening to physically harm her both verbally and with an instrument...not common at all.

Posted by: DC_MAN88 | September 15, 2009 6:33 PM

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