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Posted at 1:15 PM ET, 12/22/2010

Nick Young taking advantage of Gilbert Arenas's absence

By Michael Lee

This season has already been filled with many surprises, from John Wall's injury woes to Gilbert Arenas's trade to Orlando, but those situations have created a truly startling development: In the past two games, Nick Young has been announced last in player introductions.


Come and get some. (Photo by Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)

Being the final player introduced is generally a sign of stature on the team, and within the hearts of the fans. And while his position is far from being permanent -- especially when Wall returns from the bone bruise in his right knee -- it does speak to how far Young has come. From being a guy who only got a starting nod in the preseason because Arenas faked a knee injury (and Al Thornton was injured) to all of a sudden emerging as a go-to-guy on offense.

"It shows a lot, that I never gave up, I never really quit," said Young, who is averaging a career-high 14.5 points per game. "I kept at it, and I'm just happy, it's paying off."

In the past two games since Arenas was dealt, Young has been the last Wizards called and scored 51 points, including a season-high 30 against Miami in the first game. Coach Flip Saunders describes Young as a "bad shot maker" since he always seems to fade or lean on jumpers, and takes several more while contested. But teams have to pay him attention.

Young had the play of the night during the Wizards' 108-75 win against Charlotte, when he caught a pass from Kirk Hinrich in the left corner, pump faked to get Boris Diaw, then split Diaw and Kwame Brown with a dribble and let the ball bounce into his lap before elevating for a dunk.

As Young got ready to describe his improved play this season, Hilton Armstrong walked past a group of reporters and shouted, "Nick, you're in the starting lineup now that Gil left. You happy that Gil left? That's a good question for you guys to ask."

Young chuckled and shook his head as Armstrong walked away, because he knows how much Arenas has helped him this season.

Arenas attempted to groom Young for his slot, believing that his future in Washington would be brief. "We talked about the games. Worked out a little bit. He was telling me different days, get to the gym early. Show your dedication," Young said about Arenas. "He told me before he left, don't let nobody bring you down. Continue to stay how you've been and you've been playing. It's words of advice that can stay there. He's just a great player. He worked hard to get to where he's at. I wish the best for him."

Young tried to explain what has gone through his mind as he waits to be the last player welcomed each game. He laughed when asked if he thought about doing "The Dougie."

"It felt good because you always want that, but there's pressure. Sometimes I don't know what to do," Young said about coming out for pre-game introductions. "Do I come out early or do I wait 'til my name is called? From watching Gil and them, you just got to take it and be professional, try to be as professional as I can."

Young clashed with Saunders at times last season, as the two had different opinions about how he should play. "I think he was hard on me," Young said. "I think he was tough love, trying to make me get more hungry, more focused. He has his ways of dealing with certain players."

Young is happy to see it all coming together. "It's a great opportunity. It's something I've been waiting for since I've been in the league. Happy to be in this situation and hopefully this thing keeps going."

By Michael Lee  | December 22, 2010; 1:15 PM ET
Categories:  Nick Young  
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Comments

Young clashed with Saunders at times last season, as the two had different opinions about how he should play. "I think he was hard on me," Young said. "I think he was tough love, trying to make me get more hungry, more focused. He has his ways of dealing with certain players."

Can't wait for the Anti-Saunders crowd's spin on this. C'mon Larry, you know this bait is too tasty to pass up.

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 1:31 PM | Report abuse

This is funny because i remeber gilbert writing in his blog nick youngs rookie saying that in four years nick would be one of the best shooting guards in the league and its been exactly four years good call gilbert

Posted by: BlackHibachi | December 22, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

@Kal,

I am waiting as well.

@BlackHibachi,

So now NY is "one of the best shooting guards in the league" all of a sudden? Let's not get too crazy. I mean he's so good he has started two games on a team with 7 wins or is it 8 now. I'll take what he is and that is a very talenting maturing SG. Let's hope the maturing continues!

Posted by: rphilli721 | December 22, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

I have to admit that I never thought I'd witness NY doing what he's doing. He's being aggressive and getting to his spots, and his shot looks very fluid. I have only one gripe: NY has got to be willing to make the pass when he's confronted by two defenders. He is being presented with a lot of chances to create easy scoring opportunities for his teammates, but he often opts for a highly contested jumper. Dump it down, NY.

Posted by: ZardsFan1 | December 22, 2010 2:07 PM | Report abuse

"I mean he's so good he has started two games on a team with 7 wins or is it 8 now."

I agree with your post, but NY should have been starting a month ago.

Posted by: doogiex | December 22, 2010 2:10 PM | Report abuse

Michael Lee-
You're a great reporter, but every time you write something about far Nick Young has come he lays an egg in the next game. When he goes one for nine tonight, I'm blaming you.

Posted by: press5 | December 22, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Gotta give Nick props. I was definitely on the "package Nick for a pick" bandwagon before the season began. He's been the biggest surprise of this season, so far. If he picks it up even more on defense, and learns to pass it when he's smothered (good call, ZardsFan1), he'll keep his starting gig for a long time. Off course, that's assuming Flip can bear to bring Hinrich off the bench. Can't see why a team with only 2 point guards would start both. Especially, when the Wunderkind is showing signs of wear and tear already.

Posted by: creativefunk | December 22, 2010 2:50 PM | Report abuse

NY starting makes us better defensively and his offense is as good as any SG. When hes making shots hes kobe but when he doesn't hes just a dude with an afro.

Posted by: jefferu | December 22, 2010 3:03 PM | Report abuse

Can't wait for the Anti-Saunders crowd's spin on this.

Flip is one of the best coaches in the NBA regarding guards IMHO. I have said that several times. Cassell helps remendously also.

What I don't like about Flip is he can't coach a big man to save his life. The only big man on this squad who knows his fundimentals is Yi. In Flips offense, the plays revolve around guards. There are NEVER any plays to any of the bigmen. Flips rotations are horrid also, he plays 50 different line ups every night even if dudes are not injured. Kind of hard to build any kind of chemistry doing that in any squad regardless of the sport.

There are now 4 legit starters on this squad with Lewis and Howard coming back. Flip better not mess that up.

I also credit NY for not giving up and staying focused(this year). He's always had the talent, but he was also the "goofball" at the end of the bench. I think it was Kobe who said he would like to have NY for a summer and "beat some toughness into him" or something like that.

Dude is playing lights out right now.

- Ray

Posted by: rmcazz | December 22, 2010 3:10 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, Nick Young is great. He had thirty against the Lakers and then 3 the following game.

Posted by: WestCoastBullet | December 22, 2010 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Hate to say I told you so, but I told you so. ;)

Posted by: divi3 | December 22, 2010 3:41 PM | Report abuse

I have to say that even i am starting to come around about Nick, although i am still leery.

I guess I just see too much AJ English/Ledell Eackles in him; ie: Ok player on a really bad team looks really good.

Ledell had 6 games of 30 or more pts (one with more than 40) in his 4th season and the team went on to 25 wins. he also averaged fewer than 2 assts.

AJ English had 7 games with over 20 pts that same season. heck, even harvey grant avg'd like 18 or 19 that year (Blatche anyone?)

the next year LaBradford Smith avg'd around 15 ppg and dropped 37 on Jordan...in a loss.

Just saying...keep it up Nick and I will come around eventually. But start getting wins, and i will believe it a lot faster.

Posted by: Blurred | December 22, 2010 3:44 PM | Report abuse

Sorry- that ppg for LaBradford was actually a per 36. I looked at the wrong column.

Posted by: Blurred | December 22, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Larry Brown just stepped down as head coach of the bobcats. Does he want a job as a GM?

Posted by: jefferu | December 22, 2010 3:55 PM | Report abuse

"What I don't like about Flip is he can't coach a big man to save his life. The only big man on this squad who knows his fundimentals is Yi."

Learning fundamentals is what pee wee leagues, middle school, H.S., and (to a lesser extent) college are for. If a player doesn't have sound, basic fundamentals by the time he becomes a paid professional at the NBA level, the odds of him picking them up are slim at best. It's the equivalent of learning your ABCS and verb/noun agreement when it comes to reading and writing. It's something you're supposed to learn early on and use as a foundation for building knowledge throughout life. If you make it to 22 and don't know it, it's going to be tough to pick it up because it requires (A) a willingness and motivation to learn and (B) the ability to reverse a lifetime of bad habits. Yi learned his fundamentals at a young age as part of the Chinese national sports program. McGee never did because he was always able to get by on his size and athleticism.

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 3:57 PM | Report abuse

Young looks good know and has shown improvement, but it's way too soon to declare he's arrived. I seem to recall that, a couple seasons ago, J.R. Smith had a run where it looked like he'd turned the corner and people were saying some of the same things about him. Didn't hold, however.

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 4:01 PM | Report abuse

About Larry Brown's resignation in Charlotte: I understand he was upset that Jordan couldn't bring Gilbert Arenas.

Posted by: Samson151 | December 22, 2010 4:04 PM | Report abuse

"Larry Brown just stepped down as head coach of the bobcats. Does he want a job as a GM?"

Posted by: jefferu | December 22, 2010 3:55 PM

If people are critical of Saunders changing the lineup, they're gonna love LB trying to trade half the roster every time they have two bad games in a row.

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 4:06 PM | Report abuse

Let's see, the Chicago game should mark the passing of the first third of the regular season schedule. Anything above 30% is well past the threshold for reliability. So Wages of Wins has projected us as winning 19.1 games. If we keep going 7-19 every 27 games, we should exceed their expectations.

I'm excited already.

Posted by: Samson151 | December 22, 2010 4:09 PM | Report abuse

"Young looks good know and has shown improvement, but it's way too soon to declare he's arrived."

I must disagree. He's clearly the best SG in the division. And if it should turn out that he isn't, we already know who's fault that will be.

Posted by: Samson151 | December 22, 2010 4:10 PM | Report abuse

"About Larry Brown's resignation in Charlotte: I understand he was upset that Jordan couldn't bring Gilbert Arenas."

Posted by: Samson151 | December 22, 2010 4:04 PM

I would have paid money to see Brown trying to coexist with Arenas. (Have to say though, an Arenas for Gerald Wallace swap would have been nice.)

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Watch MJ hire Eddie Jordan! It seems like he pick up every leftover from the Wizards - Dmac, Livigton, Kbrown.

Posted by: demonj21 | December 22, 2010 4:34 PM | Report abuse

If people are critical of Saunders changing the lineup, they're gonna love LB trying to trade half the roster every time they have two bad games in a row.
Posted by: kalo_rama

Ah, but isn't one of the major criticisms of Saunders that "he always blames the players" (and not himself)? With Brown we could change that charge to "he always blames himself" (however insincerely, in addition to the players). Maybe some folks would like that.

Posted by: nmik | December 22, 2010 4:46 PM | Report abuse

If people are critical of Saunders changing the lineup, they're gonna love LB trying to trade half the roster every time they have two bad games in a row.
Posted by: kalo_rama

Ah, but isn't one of the major criticisms of Saunders that "he always blames the players" (and not himself)? With Brown we could change that charge to "he always blames himself" (however insincerely, in addition to the players). Maybe some folks would like that.

Posted by: nmik | December 22, 2010 4:47 PM | Report abuse

"Learning fundamentals is what pee wee leagues, middle school, H.S., and (to a lesser extent) college are for."

Kids are coming into the NBA after one year of college, and they played on the street before that. There is no "developemental" league for basketball before the pros anymore. Some of the best coaches in the NBA are also known as the best "teachers" of the game. There are no more "John Wooden's" in college and never will be because of how things are set up in today's basketball world.

I highly disagree with your statement. John Wall is so good because he is a student of the game. Look at how many players are busts in the NBA and compare that to other sports who can send thier
players down to the "farm" where they can keep honing thier skills. Player per player the NBA has more "busts" then any other sport. The NBA is the ONLY sport where you can draft a David Robinson or a Tim Duncan and go from the lottery one year to the Finals the next.

It took Chauncey Billups years before he was considered a decent player in the NBA. There just aren't many "elite" players in basketball, but there are a lot of Kwame Brown's. Most of these kids are getting by on "dunking" and height/size advantages when they are young. Then they play a year of college and jump to the NBA. That's it. Yi played professional ball for YEARS in China before coming to the NBA and learned what he knows there. He never learned any of what he knows while being in the NBA because he's never had anyone coach him here. He brought what he knows to the Wiz, they didn't show him anything. He just lacks strength.

The guards on the Wiz have a great teacher in Sam Cassell, who had Kenny Smith/Rudy T as his teachers. The big men on this team have nobody, it's pretty sad.

- Ray

Posted by: rmcazz | December 22, 2010 5:14 PM | Report abuse

@kalo

@sampson151

@Larryinclinton

I, like all of you (and some I didn't name) has doubted NY's game at times but I will admit that he's kill'n em right now. The potential was always there but he seemed to overshadowed by Gil so much, I didn't think he'd ever step up and play lights out like he is not. NOW . . . the real question is can he keep it up for the remainder of the season. Nick is in a contract year and that $3.6 qualifying offer would make EG's punk a$$ have to step up and pay NY or will NY fizzle out and "do what you always do, Jack" ( Mos Def- 16 Blocks)!

Posted by: zack9633 | December 22, 2010 5:15 PM | Report abuse

"What I don't like about Flip is he can't coach a big man to save his life. The only big man on this squad who knows his fundimentals is Yi."

What about Kevin Garnett? or maybe he wasn't that good?

Posted by: Samson151 | December 22, 2010 5:17 PM | Report abuse

"Ah, but isn't one of the major criticisms of Saunders that "he always blames the players" (and not himself)?"

Yes, all of the time. McGee is a good example of someone who was brimming with confidence back in November and now is a shell of himself in December.

- Ray

Posted by: rmcazz | December 22, 2010 5:17 PM | Report abuse

"What about Kevin Garnett? or maybe he wasn't that good?"

Garnett was/is a special player and if I recall Flip got fired from that gig. For years Garnett was considered "soft" and if I recall even Flip mentioned that a few times, the same way he does with our guys.

He's such a confidence builder.

- Ray

Posted by: rmcazz | December 22, 2010 5:21 PM | Report abuse

McGee is a good example of someone who was brimming with confidence back in November and now is a shell of himself in December.
Posted by: rmcazz

----

mcgee's a good example of someone who should never have been "brimming with confidence" in the first place. he's a good example of a player who thinks he can get by on athleticism (run and jump) without needing to learn how really to play. he improved for a while when he was "being yelled at" (his words). maybe he just needs to be yelled at more to improve some more.

Posted by: MinuMang | December 22, 2010 5:35 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, but let's not forget that Stephen Jackson is on the market as well. We could have had a trade for all ages, a "Swap of the Gunmen."

Posted by: NWDC3 | December 22, 2010 5:48 PM | Report abuse

"Kids are coming into the NBA after one year of college, and they played on the street before that. There is no "developemental" league for basketball before the pros anymore."

(A) There is a "developmental league." Maybe you've heard of it. It's called (wait for it) . . . "The Developmental League." And (B) you missed my (rather obvious) point by a country mile. By the time most players come into the NBA they've been playing basketball for most of the day everyday for about half their lives. Just like if you get a job as an editor at a publishing house, your boss doesn't expect to have to teach you how to read or spell, if you get a job as a pro basketball player, your boss doesn't expect to have to teach you how to box out or make a layup. That doesn't mean there aren't still things to be learned, but certain baseline knowledge is expected when you accept the gig and start cashing the paychecks.

"I highly disagree with your statement. John Wall is so good because he is a student of the game."

I fail to see how that's disagreeing with my statement (let alone "highly") since I never said jack about John Wall. If anything, it supports my point. John Wall learned what he was supposed to at the lower levels. McGee didn't. Do you really think Wall learned everything on his own with no input from coaches at earlier levels? Or is it more likely that he was simply a more attentive student and made a greater effort than his peers to grasp what was being taught? Do you really think the reason McGee didn't learn anything is because no one ever tried to teach him? Or is it more likely because he had the same problem in college and H.S. that he has now: a short attention span and an apparent inability to learn from his mistakes?

"Look at how many players are busts in the NBA and compare that to other sports who can send thier players down to the "farm" where they can keep honing thier skills. Player per player the NBA has more "busts" then any other sport."

Putting aside the obvious fact that you just pulled that "stat" out of thin air and have no actual evidence to back it up . . . Look how many of the "busts" in the NBA are players with great natural physical tools (e.g., size, strength, speed, quickness) of the kind that few players have at the lower levels, the kind that allowed them to dominate at those levels with pure physical talent without much fundamental ability. Then look at how many of those players fail in the NBA because they are unable/unwilling to grasp those fundamentals. Than ask yourself if there's any connection between the two. (Hint: There is.)

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 5:51 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, that last comment was directed at Kalo's discussion of Arenas-for-Wallace swap.

As for the comment that Nick should have been starting a month ago, he should have been starting two years ago. If only this team weren't going with Ed Tapscott's motto of playing your vets 45 minutes a game when you're getting blown out by 35 every night.

Posted by: NWDC3 | December 22, 2010 5:52 PM | Report abuse


"Garnett was/is a special player and if I recall Flip got fired from that gig."

Oh please, not this tired old routine. Pretty much every coach in every sport will get fired eventually. If there was any merit to the idea that getting fired from a coaching job equals being bad at it, then almost every coach in the NBA over the past 75 years other than Sloan and Popovich stinks. Saunders coached the Wolves for just short of 10 years. How many other coaches, during that same period, lasted as long?

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 5:53 PM | Report abuse

Young clashed with Saunders at times last season, as the two had different opinions about how he should play. "I think he was hard on me," Young said. "I think he was tough love, trying to make me get more hungry, more focused. He has his ways of dealing with certain players."
Can't wait for the Anti-Saunders crowd's spin on this. C'mon Larry, you know this bait is too tasty to pass up.

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 1:31 PM | Report abuse

======================================

Wait no longer. effff Saunders!

Posted by: bobilly1 | December 22, 2010 5:53 PM | Report abuse

kalo_rama, you are a classic.....

His comment #1, posted 6 seconds after this article appeared, is a preemptive strike to fashion the discussion around this article as proof that the anti-Saunders camp is deluded .... and not as counterproof to kalo's long-running diatribes that NY is a total waste of space without any long-term future worth having in this league (as his later posting tries to address: i.e. NY's still a potential no-hoper and thus I, the great kalo, am still conceivably correct about this as well as everything else I've ever uttered).

I'll give Flip credit for NY's improvement, if you'll grant me this ... that Flip was hired originally to "win now" with The Big Three, in a team where NY at best was a bit player coming off the bench to score. The fact that all that talent and more has now been traded away and NY is the "Big One" that remains can be advanced as credible support for the thesis that Flip's tenure as coach has been an abject failure to date.

I also view NY's quote above as classic "damning with faint praise." Its hardly an enthusiastic endorsement of the coach, particularly from a guy who goes out of his way to deliver over-the-top praise of all his team mates.

I'll also give Flip credit for sticking around to try to clean up the mess that he's had a large part in creating. Whether he's up to it, time will tell. He seems to be a one trick pony as regards coaching ... unless he has all the tools he needs to run his particular schemes, he can't or won't adapt.

I'll now await the inevitable ad hominem abuse/ridicule that must accompany any posting that questions the great kalo's infallibility.

Posted by: ArchieTambo | December 22, 2010 5:55 PM | Report abuse

Garnett was/is a special player and if I recall Flip got fired from that gig.
Do you think Flip's firing had something to do with Garnett not developing as a player?

For years Garnett was considered "soft" and if I recall even Flip mentioned that a few times, the same way he does with our guys.
That kind of taunting of a player might come under the heading of motivational coaching. Phil Jackson used to meow occasionally at Kwame Brown as he passed him on the bench. Didn't seem to help much with KB. I can't say I like that style of coaching but it seems to be fairly standard.

He's such a confidence builder.
Yeah, well Garnett turned out to be a tangle of insecurity and something of a marshmallow.

Posted by: midlevex_ | December 22, 2010 5:57 PM | Report abuse

I'll give Flip credit for NY's improvement, if you'll grant me this ... that Flip was hired originally to "win now" with The Big Three... The fact that all that talent and more has now been traded away and NY is the "Big One"...can be advanced...for the thesis that Flip's tenure as coach has been an abject failure to date.

We're really going to cycle back into the swamp of the big bust of the big three? Okay, one more time, the big three were never together for any more than a handful of games without one or another going out with an injury. The year Arenas went down with the knee injury they had a nice stretch under EJ. Otherwise that show never had an extended run.

It's fairly clear that Jamison, Butler and Arenas with Haywood at center were at best first, maybe second round playoff talent, no matter who was coaching.

Posted by: midlevex_ | December 22, 2010 6:30 PM | Report abuse

Kids are coming into the NBA after one year of college, and they played on the street before that.

Um, no. If they're good enough to make it to the NBA, most of them have been playing on AAU teams or powerhouse high school teams at some point, if not for a long time.

There is no "developemental" league for basketball before the pros anymore. Some of the best coaches in the NBA are also known as the best "teachers" of the game. There are no more "John Wooden's" in college and never will be because of how things are set up in today's basketball world.

I disagree with Kalo's assessment that players can't learn fundamentals in the pros. They can, but they have to want to, and they have to put the time in.

But the rest of what you said above is bunk. There may be no teams like Wooden's UCLA team (or Geno's UCONN team), but to say there are no good hoops teachers in college anymore is just silly.

Posted by: ts35 | December 22, 2010 6:46 PM | Report abuse

"I, like all of you (and some I didn't name) has doubted NY's game at times but I will admit that he's kill'n em right now...I didn't think he'd ever step up and play lights out like he is not. NOW . . . the real question is can he keep it up for the remainder of the season. Nick is in a contract year and that $3.6 qualifying offer would make EG's punk a$$ have to step up and pay NY or will NY fizzle out and "do what you always do, Jack" ( Mos Def- 16 Blocks)!Posted by: zack9633"

I got curious about Nick's recent play and took a few minutes to look at the month of December, through the Charlotte game. Here are the numbers I got:

Number of games: 9
Average minutes played: 30.22
Median minutes played: 32
PPG: 19.2
FG%: 48.5%
3Pt%: 43.6%
FT%: 83.3%
Rebounds: 2.67
Assists: 1.0
TOs: 2.0
Steals: 0.89
PFs: 3.11

The shooting percentages are a substantial improvement over his career (44.1% from the field, 38.9% from the arc), which were established over 256 games. The percentages are enough better than career to make me wonder if what we're watching isn't a shooter on a hot streak. His other numbers -- assists, FT%, TOs, steals, PFs, etc -- aren't terribly different. The shooting, however, is.

Anyway, just a thought. We'll all get to see what comes next.

Posted by: Samson151 | December 22, 2010 6:54 PM | Report abuse

The percentages are enough better than career to make me wonder if what we're watching isn't a shooter on a hot streak.

I wouldn't be surprised to see him come back to earth a bit with his numbers, at the same time, he's getting his shots mostly from the offense which means he's usually in good rhythm, etc. I don't know if I would call now a hot streak as much as it wouldn't be unusual for any shooter to eventually hit a cold streak. Defenses are also starting to pay more attention to him, but the additions of legit scorers in RL and Howard may help keep defenses from keying on him too much.

Posted by: ts35 | December 22, 2010 7:43 PM | Report abuse

"I disagree with Kalo's assessment that players can't learn fundamentals in the pros. They can, but they have to want to, and they have to put the time in."

How can you disagree with something I never said?

I didn't say anything about how "players can't learn fundamentals in the pros." I said:

"It's something you're supposed to learn early on and use as a foundation for building knowledge throughout life. If you make it to 22 and don't know it, it's going to be tough to pick it up because it requires (A) a willingness and motivation to learn and (B) the ability to reverse a lifetime of bad habits."

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 3:57 PM

Basically my position was exactly the same one you stated after saying you disagreed with me. (Thus keeping your streak alive.)

Posted by: kalo_rama | December 23, 2010 1:10 AM | Report abuse

Nick Young is a bad shot maker. Why would the coach say that to the media, or to Nick Young. It may be true, but do you say to Tiger Woods; I dont know how you make that putt the way lean that way. Do you say to your best hitter, I dont see how you can keep your hitting streak going "the way you address the plate". Saunders is an idiot!!! So many things in sports is mental !!!, Saunders is a mental case.

Posted by: 1bmffwb | December 23, 2010 1:56 AM | Report abuse

I'm for one not jumping on the boat with the rest of the crowd.

Come on dude, it has not been four months now nick the man?

Dude is streakie at best.

Not consistant!

Don't attack the basket enough for a person with his skills.

Time will tell....

Posted by: shamken | December 23, 2010 7:42 AM | Report abuse

Maybe on our 82nd game, we can have all our our players active :)

Posted by: fearturtle44 | December 23, 2010 8:13 AM | Report abuse

Ny is a beast! Blatche is an idiot! get him off the court please.

Posted by: jyshim | December 23, 2010 8:44 AM | Report abuse

"I disagree with Kalo's assessment that players can't learn fundamentals in the pros. They can, but they have to want to, and they have to put the time in."
How can you disagree with something I never said?

I didn't say anything about how "players can't learn fundamentals in the pros." I said:

"It's something you're supposed to learn early on and use as a foundation for building knowledge throughout life. If you make it to 22 and don't know it, it's going to be tough to pick it up because it requires (A) a willingness and motivation to learn and (B) the ability to reverse a lifetime of bad habits."
Posted by: kalo_rama | December 22, 2010 3:57 PM

Basically my position was exactly the same one you stated after saying you disagreed with me. (Thus keeping your streak alive.)

Posted by: kalo_rama

My fault, I started to read your original post, then got bored and skipped ahead. You don't even read all the way through your own posts, no reason to hold the rest of us to a higher standard.

Posted by: ts35 | December 23, 2010 4:09 PM | Report abuse

I admit to long having believed that Young could never be anything but a talented, unreliable, undisciplined air head. He's taking the game a LOT more seriously this year -- at both ends of the floor. He's looking like a keeper and I hope he doesn't lose minutes to Howard and Lewis.

Posted by: dolph924 | December 24, 2010 2:57 PM | Report abuse

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